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I was warning everyone that the details may not be correct so it may not be worth quoting it to anyone just yet.

 

The HMCS website (Her Majesty's Courts Service - Home) only lists the Gloucester Probate Sub-Registry and Gloucestershire Family and Civil Courts at the address from the references you mention.

 

The HMCS is the authoritive source for court lists, so although the sites you mention have the court listed it may have been renamed since they were written, hence why I was after the verification.

 

I didn't think you'd made it up, I just wanted to make sure that the court name is correct because if anyone uses this as an example then they could end up with egg on their face because the court name isn't correct.

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Can anyone give me some advice

 

I am a student I moved into my student house on 17th Oct 07

I found out about the TDS and asked my agency which one I was with on March 1st. They said I was with a certain one, I left it to March 20th, sent them email saying I want the paperwork and I was willing to court. Then sent me letter shortly after, they signed me up to protection on March 21st. So they failed to notify me within 14th days, and they didnt protect me for 6 months. Can I claim, I am now concerned also that Im not going to get my depoist back in a timely fashion, they said its going take at least 28 days, but thats allowed because there big agency and have so many houses.

 

Any advice will be greatly appreaciated

 

Tom

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I have asked before and I am going to ask again; can all queries, requests for advice, support etc be posted in a main forum. This thread is ONLY for TDS related news, tips, updates, comments on legislation etc.

[sIGPIC][/sIGPIC]

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  • 3 weeks later...

A claim for a penalty award of three times the amount of the deposit, under section 214(4) of the Housing Act 2004, might not succeed if the deposit has been protected or repaid before the court hearing takes place, even if it was not protected when the claim was begun.

 

This is because the court can only make an award under section 214(4) if it has made an order for repayment or protection: the Act does not provide for it to make an award under section 214(4) where the deposit has already been refunded or protected (and so no order for refund or protection is possible) - see http://resource.nusonline.co.uk/media/resource/enforcement_pack.pdf

 

However, protecting the deposit after being sued will not save the landlord if the tenancy has ended. In that case the court has a power to make an order for the repayment of the deposit to the tenant, which will give it jurisdiction to make a penalty award under section 214(4).

 

This appears to have been the case in the only reported decision on section 214(4), posted at http://www.consumeractiongroup.co.uk/forum/residential-commercial-lettings/138758-tenancy-deposit-case-section.html

 

The landlord could only protect himself in such a case by making repayment of the deposit in full to the tenant, before the hearing date, which in that decided case he had not done.

 

If the tenancy is still in existence, the landlord runs the risk at the court hearing of being ordered to repay the deposit in full (if that is the only avenue left open to the court to enable it to make a penalty award). That situation may never arise in practice; for upon receiving a tenant's application under section 214(4) a landlord's first step is likely to be to serve 2 months notice on the tenant, which will bring the tenancy to an end before the date of the court hearing.

 

For full details see http://www.consumeractiongroup.co.uk/forum/residential-commercial-lettings/117280-tenancy-deposit-scheme.html#post1184266

 

 

Advice & opinions on this forum are offered informally, without any assumption of liability. Use your own judgment. Seek advice of a qualified and insured professional if you have any doubts.

Edited by Ed999

Note

 

This is a self-help forum in which users share their experiences. Assistance is offered informally, without any assumption of liability. Use your own judgement; obtain advice from a qualified and insured professional if you have any doubts.

 

This posting gives general guidance only. It is not an authoritative statement of the law. Consult a Solicitor for specific advice before deciding on any course of action.

 

 

Further information:

 

Assured and Shorthold tenancies - A guide for tenants

 

Renting and Leasehold - Advice from Shelter

 

 

All posts are opinion only

 

 

If you've found my suggestions useful, please click on my star and add a comment

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I think this is an old leaflet that was quoted a while ago in a sticky. But it hedges its bets...

 

A much better understanding comes from the Legal Action group article.

 

I would be wary of posting old information as in the context of chronological posts it can appear as new and authoratiative.

 

I initially thought you had discovered something new.

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A claim for a penalty award of three times the amount of the deposit, under section 214(4) of the Housing Act 2004, might not succeed if the deposit has been protected or repaid before the court hearing takes place, even if it was not protected when the claim was begun.

 

This is because the court can only make an award under section 214(4) if it has made an order for repayment or protection: the Act does not provide for it to make an award under section 214(4) where the deposit has already been refunded or protected (and so no order for refund or protection is possible) - see http://resource.nusonline.co.uk/media/resource/enforcement_pack.pdf

 

However, protecting the deposit after being sued will not save the landlord if the tenancy has ended. In that case the court has a power to make an order for the repayment of the deposit to the tenant, which will give it jurisdiction to make a penalty award under section 214(4).

 

This appears to have been the case in the only reported decision on section 214(4), posted at http://www.consumeractiongroup.co.uk/forum/residential-commercial-lettings/138758-tenancy-deposit-case-section.html

 

The landlord could only protect himself in such a case by making repayment of the deposit in full to the tenant, before the hearing date, which in that decided case he had not done.

 

If the tenancy is still in existence, the landlord runs the risk at the court hearing of being ordered to repay the deposit in full (if that is the only avenue left open to the court to enable it to make a penalty award). That situation may never arise in practice; for upon receiving a tenant's application under section 214(4) a landlord's first step is likely to be to serve 2 months notice on the tenant, which will bring the tenancy to an end before the date of the court hearing.

 

For full details see http://www.consumeractiongroup.co.uk/forum/residential-commercial-lettings/117280-tenancy-deposit-scheme.html#post1184266

 

 

Advice & opinions on this forum are offered informally, without any assumption of liability. Use your own judgment. Seek advice of a qualified and insured professional if you have any doubts.

 

Ed, you are mistaken. You are very much mistaken. On a number of levels.

 

You really must understand, that the only thing that matters in this entire matter is what the law says.

 

I would recommend that you actually read section 214 of the Housing Act 2004. I would also suggest that you find the Houses of Parliament entry in Hansard concerning the introduction of the Tenancy Deposit Order 2007 and the reason that the Lords and the Legislator saw fit to have it enacted. I think you'll find it quite enlightening.

 

Then, I think you'll find that the long and the short of it is that it is completely irrelevant as to whether a landlord may or may not have already refunded a deposit to a tenant either before or after that tenant's application to the County Court.

 

Section 214(4) HA04 is not a civil provision. It is not the slightest bit concerned with whether a tenant has suffered a loss or not. It simply requires landlords to follow the rules. And if landlords don't follow the rules, and a tenant reports it to the Court, then the landlord must pay the penalty. No tort. No mitigation. No discussion. Nothing. Just the penalty.

 

That is the reality of the Tenancy Deposit Order 2007 and the Housing Act 2004.

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  • 1 month later...

My first post and I wondered if anyone can help.

 

I signed a 6 month lease AST on April 2007 renewed Ocotber 2007 and given 2 months statury notice by the lalndlords in Feb 2008.On signing the original agreement we paid a deposit of £650.

 

According to the agrrement we were supposed to have recived notice within 14 days of moving out of the property notice of any deductions to be made.Having recived no notice I wrote to the agents requsting return of the deposit.Lo and behold they produced a letter dated within the 14 day period which I never recived,I doubt it was ever sent as these agents have a reputation for not receiving/not sending letters. I referred ithis tothe TDS but they are dragging there feet.

 

My question is;Have I the right to take it out of the hands of The Dispute Service and persue the case through the small claims court?

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At this stage you should definitely be taking the matter to the County Court.

 

Start a new thread for your case in this forum, set out the details below, with as many additional details and corrected typos as possible.

 

That way, everyone on here who is able to help should be able to provide assistance to steer you in the right direction.

 

As Cedric The Entertainer once said... "You gon' nail their ass!" :)

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  • 1 month later...

Another decision just come through, this ones from Reading County Court and went to a hearing last Friday morning.

 

Tenancy started November 2007 and ended March 2008. There was no signed contract, just a set of terms agreed by email. The LL was given an opportunity to prove that the agreement did not form an Assured Short-hold Tenancy , but the LL was unable to do so.

 

The LL then claimed damage to the property and that the tenant had tricked him into the situation, but the judge stated that she had no option but to award the return of the full deposit plus the three times penalty.

 

The judge gave leave for the LL to appeal and stayed enforcement of the award for 28 days because she was unaware of the law being tested at a higher court and thought it was appropriate to give leave for appeal on those grounds.

 

In the hearing the judge made it clear that, in her opinion, the tenants behaviour was not relevant, the state of the property was not relevant, and she was not at liberty to use her discretion in relation to the award.

 

Looks like another tenant win :).

Edited by RentedAndRankled
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At first sight, I would wonder why the judge would consider it any in way necessary for a landlord to be allowed to appeal on such a simple point of law.

 

As the judge rightly identified, the legislation is drafted in order to quite specifically direct that the behaviour of either the landlord or the tenant is irrelevant for the purposes of the section 214 of the House Act, and whether a deposit should be returned and the payment of a penalty should be ordered.

 

However, should the moronic landlord in question be foolish enough to take the matter to the Court of Appeal, then it would make a tenant's life much easier in the future. After all, once a Court of Appeal have heard the case and thrown out the landlord's arguments, any future tenant in any similar position which turns on the Tenancy Deposit Scheme provisions within the housing act, will indeed have a much easier time of succeeding with a case in the County Court. It wouldn't even be relevant for a future case to be heard, in that instance, as the point of law would've already been decided in a superior Court, and providing any future tenant's case stands on 'all fours' with that of the Reading case mentioned above, then there would be no room for argument.

Edited by Mr Pipps
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Looks like the main rule of thumb is to keep things on track and to the point.

 

If the judge wants to discuss LL or Tenant behaviour, property state, etc., it may be wise to respectfully ask the judge how that would have a bearing on the point of law in question (remember, if you're in a small claims court you can ask for a little help from the judge). If the judge can't give an answer that refers to specific points in law then the tenant would have good grounds for an appeal if they did not win on the basis that the judges decision was a mis-interpretation of the law.

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Hi everyone,

 

I've had a post running (some good debate with Planner) about the implications of s.214 and how it allows landlords a 'get out of jail' so long as they comply with s.213(6)(a) - i.e. they can protect the deposit whenever they choose because once protected and a deposit certificate issued and given to the tenant, the grounds for 3x penalty are no longer valid.

 

Has anyone else noticed this? Anyone found a way around it yet?

 

Mr. Pipps, Ed posted earlier on page two about how action might not succeed under s.214 if the landlord protects or returns the deposit. Your post directed Ed to re-read s.214. I've spent a lot of time reading s.214 and I've got to agree with Ed, unless you can pursuade me otherwise (please do because I've been caught by the letting agent here!), the 3x penalty is applicable where either a) the landlord has protected the deposit, but outside the 14 days, and provided the certificate after protection, or b) has returned the deposit.

 

Mr. Pipps, you were quite strong in your condemnation of Ed, please provide evidence - quote the section and your interpretation - for your view. Hopefully, we can all debate it / reach a consensus on what it really means. Two heads, or in this case probably twenty heads, are better than one letting agent!

Edited by Resoli
Forgot to add something! and a typo!
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I'm not legally qualified, but here's my take.

 

S214(2) states that the penalties in 214(3) & 214(4) "apply if on such an application to the court" the requirements have not been satisfied. Therefore there is a strong case for situation as at the time of the application to the court, and not at the time of the hearing, to be what controls the outcome.

 

That said, the UK courts as operate on a "Spirit of the law" principal, so a judge may take the spirit to be a penalty on LLs who refuse to comply with the requirements and may see a LL who has subsequently protected or repaid the deposit in full to be a LL who just made an honest mistake, but in these cases there is potentially grounds for appeal on the basis that the law may have been misinterpreted.

 

The procedure for an appeal is relatively quick and painless, but must be started as soon as possible after the judgement. If you're not happy about the decision and there is a point of law behind your disagreement with it, the best thing to do is ask for "leave to appeal" at the time of the hearing, the judge will then usually tell you if they beleive you have a reasonable case for appeal and may offer you some suggestions (such as "get a solicitors advice"). You should always rememember though that just because you don't like a decision it isn't automatically wrong!!!!

 

So in a nutshell, it's down to the judges, and although they can't use their discrestion where there is a clear breach and the LL has not protected the deposit at the time of the hearing, they may see a LL who has repaid the deposit in full or protected the deposit before the hearing takes place (i.e. the LL has complied with one of the two options the court has available to it under S214(3)) as having made a reasonable efforts to have resolve the issue, and not award in the tenants favour.

 

Now if anyone wants to debate the point, I'm sure that any debate will help tenants going to court in a similar situation as it will provide comments and arguments why the judge should award in their favour.

Edited by RentedAndRankled
Added bit about don't appeal just if you don't like the outcome
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Hello Resoli

 

Thank you for your comments.

 

Your post made for rather interesting reading. And it sounds to me as if you have approached this matter by firstly quite willingly believing any old yarn that the first man in the street has offered to spin for you - and only then subsequently deciding to ask someone to assist you with the Law. For future reference, that is the wrong order to be dealing with such matters.

 

Firstly, allow me to point out that I am not required to prove anything to anyone. I am posting here simply to provide some much needed assistance to people like you.

 

Secondly, it is quite evident to me that you have not sought any professional legal advice in respect of this matter. I should remind you that I am not here to provide you with legal advice. However, I am happy to help you read and interpret the provisions of The Housing Act 2004, Part 6, Chapter 4. And I hope you will find this information useful.

 

Now, the Law. Let's start with The Housing Act 2004, s.212, on page 183 of the digital document. This section is simply concerned with identify terminology and setting out the framework which must be provided indirectly by the Government.

 

Section 213 is where it gets interesting:

 

Sub-section (1) states that a landlord must place a deposit in an authorised scheme 'as from the time when it is received'. I believe this phrase is very important for your purposes.

 

Sub-section (2) may be paraphrased to say - 'If he doesn't intend to put the deposit in a TDS, then he has no right in Law to ask for a deposit from you.'

 

Sub-section (3) provides the timeframe for the landlord to meet his legal obligations under section (1) - and this timeframe is stated as 14 days from the date on which he has received the deposit from you, as established in sub-section (1).

 

Sub-section (5) requires the landlord to inform you of the TDS arrangements that have been made.

 

Sub-section (6) places a timeframe on the landlord for furnishing you with this information - again within the same 14 day period starting on the day on which he received the deposit from you.

 

Sub-section (7) reminds us that a deposit may only be cash - not jewellery, a car or any other real or immovable property.

 

Sub-section (8 ) clarifies the term 'deposit', to our benefit.

 

Sub-section (9) points out that no party concerned can claim to have agreed either expressly or otherwise - ie 'without prejudice' - to the contrary.

 

Now let's move on to section 214 of The Act:

 

Sub-section (1) gives you the right to apply to the County Court if the landlord fails to meet any of his legal obligations under section 213 of The Act.

 

Sub-sections (1)(a) and (1)(b) point out that you or your legal representative may have cause to make such an application to the County Court where the landlord either fails to put the deposit in a TDS or fails to notify you of the TDS arrangements - in either case - within the same 14 day timeframe which starts on the day on which he received the deposit in cash from you.

 

Sub-section (2) provides that where either such circumstances arise, the matter must be dealt with as follows:

 

Under sub-section (3), the Court is required to order the landlord to return the deposit to you or your representative within 14 days of the court reaching its decision on the matter.

 

Under sub-section (4) the Court is also required to order the landlord to pay, in addition to the return of the deposit, a penalty of a sum equal to three times the amount of the deposit, within the same 14 day timeframe from the date of the Court's decision on the matter.

 

Sub-sections (5) and (6) are also useful to us, but less interesting for your purposes.

 

So, on the basis of the above, I cannot see how you can have possibly taken the understanding which you have expressed in your first post on this thread – ie that a landlord is somehow at liberty to protect a deposit outside of the 14 day timeframe prescribed in section 213(3).

 

 

I also cannot fathom how you can possibly believe that any part of section 214 or section 213(6)(b) allows the landlord to furnish you with any such information relating to TDS arrangements, and to furnish you with those details within the 14 day timeframe which is specified in section 213(6) as commencing on the date on which he received the deposit from you, whether or not those arrangements made either inside or outside the 14 day timeframe stipulated in section 213(3), and whether or not that information is provided in the prescribed form or in a form substantially to the same effect as such, as specified within section 213(6)(a). I cannot see how the provisions which you cite could possible allow a landlord to belatedly protect a deposit and thereby somehow comply with his obligations which stated expressly in section 213(1) and 213(3). The very thought of this is completely contradictory to the express provisions and the very spirit of this legislation. In Civil Law matters such as these, there is no such thing as a 'get out of jail free card' - the responsible party either met their legal obligations or they didn't. There is no middle-ground or room for manoeuvre.

 

These legal provisions were drafted by the Legislator and were intended to apply to straightforward situations where a tenant pays a sum as a deposit to a landlord at the time of signing a legal agreement to be bound by a the terms of an Assured Shorthold Tenancy arrangement, in advance of occupying the property.

 

If you are interested in reading more about why the Legislator deemed it necessary to introduce these provisions into the Housing Act, then may I suggest you read the following Explanatory Memorandum. Section 7.2 of that document probably sounds all too familiar to many tenants who have shown interest in this discussion.

 

 

I can scarcely comprehend the proposition that you may have genuinely only discussed this matter with the letting agent to date? If this is indeed the horrific truth, then you have got a lot of work to do if you have any hope of getting your case in order and succeeding in demonstrating your position in front of a Court of Law. For goodness sake - seek some legal advice! And more importantly - stop talking to people who are clearly feeding you false information.

 

Would you like to know why the letting agent would appear to have been so keen to have convinced you of anything other than the abundantly simple truth?

 

The reason is because, if your landlord entered into the lease with you via the letting agent, and the landlord contracted the letting agent to undertake what is often referred to as a ‘managed letting’, then in Tort the landlord would have the legal right to sue the letting agent for any penalty which he might be directed to pay in the event that the TDS obligations weren’t met and where the landlord can demonstrate that he should have been advised to have met those obligations. I would strongly urge you to keep this card very close to your chest throughout any and all proceedings which may follow for you.

 

I do hope you find this information suitably illuminating for your cause. I am always happy to qualify my position for anyone who cares to step up to the plate. I only ask that you be willing to talk Law, and not popular rumour or 'letting-agent-hearsay'.

 

The reason is because, if your landlord entered into the lease with you via the letting agent, and the landlord contracted the letting agent to undertake what is often referred to as a ‘managed letting’, then in Tort the landlord would have the legal right to sue the letting agent for any penalty which he might be directed to pay in the event that the TDS obligations weren’t met and where the landlord can demonstrate that he should have been advised to have met those obligations. I would strongly urge you to keep this card very close to your chest throughout any and all proceedings which may follow for you.

 

 

I hope you find this information suitably illuminating for your cause. I am always happy to qualify my position for anyone who cares to step up to the plate. I only ask that you be willing to talk Law, and not popular rumour or 'letting-agent-hearsay'.

 

Regards

 

Pipps

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Dear RentedAndRankled

 

I'm afraid that the Legislation in point here presents no ambiguity whatsoever. Therefore, how do you suppose a Judge would have any reason to take a purposive approach as you suggest?

 

When presented with prescriptive legislation, a Judge will simply take the literal meaning. And there is only one possible meaning that can be taken from these provisions.

 

The wording of section 214(2) can only be paraphrased to read that - the Court will consider the matter, in the event of an application being made, on the basis of whether the requirements of sections 213(1), 213(3) and 213(6) were met - that is, whether the landlord protected the deposit within 14 days of receiving it and duly notified the tenant of these arrangements within the same timeframe.

Furthermore, do you know what the spirit of this legislation actually is here? Have you read the TDS explanatory memorandum? Have you read Hansard?

 

The spirit of the law, and the reason for the Legislator drafting this interesting piece of legislation, is to force all landlords to undertake the handling of a tenancy deposit in the correct and appropriate manner from the commencement of the tenancy and to the end.

 

Civil Law doesn't provide 'get out of jail free cards', or even discretion in such circumstances as where a landlord has meant well really, or even tried to cover his footsteps belatedly, once he found out what the sanctions would be if he didn't.

 

 

I’m afraid there can be no reason for Judicial discretion on this matter. The legislation is abundantly clear. Section 214(4) requires the Court to direct the return of the deposit and the additional penalty of three multiples. The only point that counts is whether the landlord met his legal obligations at that time or not.

 

Whilst I will agree with you that the Judiciary have a certain amount of discretion within their remit, they fortunately do not yet possess the magical power to invent contradictory legal provisions as they go along.

 

To anyone out there who’s confused by all this - just make sure you cite the relevant TDS law at your hearing and you should at least have a chance.

 

Regards

 

Pipps

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(I'm not legally qualified, so if you are then please state so and I'll bow to your experience).

 

First off I'm not sure how you can determine the legislators state of mind unless you were the legislator. Making assumptions about another persons state of mind when they were drawing up statutes is not the basis for a solid argument.

 

Secondly, S214 is the section governing the award, and S214(1) determines the conditions under which a claim can be made, so although other parts of the act may have been breached that may not be enough to qualify for the award.

 

Finally, you should remember the judge can refuse to award you costs on the grounds of unreasonable behaviour. So if you've not sent a letter before action, refused mediation on the allocation questionairre, and refused to comminicate with the LL to reach a settlement, then you may find that you're not getting your court costs back.

 

All that said, there are only two 100% certain ways for a LL to get out of the award, and those are;

 

- The start date of the tenancy was too early to be covered.

- The tenancy was not an AST (so check your agreement).

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I’ll forgive you for not being legally qualified. Firstly, in brief, the Legislator and any associated parties must at various junctures outline the basis for their legislative proposals as a fundamental part of the enactment process. In the case of the Tenancy Deposit Order 2007, we are lucky enough to have the rather useful explantory memorandum, and I’m sure you’ll find it rather interesting once you read it. New legislation simply cannot be introduced without it’s requirement and worthiness having been sufficiently demonstrated to the Lords and for this information to be made publicy available.

 

Secondly, section 214(4) is specifically introduced within The Act with express reference to section 213. The preceeding section is therefore the only section that possesses any relevance to 214. In the event of an application to the Court, the requirement for the Court to order payment of the penalty turns solely on whether the provisions in sections 213(1), 213(3) and 213(6) were met at the time when the landlord received the deposit from the tenant. I really cannot see how there could be any other way to interpret section 214. It’s one of the simplest legislative provisions I’ve ever had the pleasure of reading.

 

Furthermore, a Judicial decision to not award costs is also one which can be appealed. There is absolutely no requirement under the Housing Act 2004 or any supposed expectation of conduct for the tenant to attempt to coerce or mediate with the landlord before legal proceedings commence. Nor would there be any basis in law for a Court to refuse a claim for costs in the absence of any such quite unnecessary endeavours.

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Hi

This is my first post.

I am using this to gain some info. I too have been having difficulty in gettting info from my letting agent (LA). i took out a tenancy on the 25th march 2008. There were various problems with the LA and the landlord (LL). Basically, the LL had breached the tenancy act and he knew this. I asked the LA to leave 3 months early, they agreed. They said the LL agreed to this. Stupidly, I didnt get this in writing and more stupidly, the LA didnt get this in writing from the LL.

So fast forward to 25th July and I move out, all agreed with the LA that if I leave the place in good condition, the deposit will be returned - normal practice. I was not aware of the Tenancy Deposit Scheme - but I am know!

So up to yesterday, I am trying to get this deposit back - the LL saying no because I moved out early. The LA saying I might not get it back because I never got it in writing. Even though I have witnesses to them saying I could vacate no problems.

I went to the Cit Advice/B and they told me all about the TD/scheme and by sound of it I am not in one.

I got the letting agent to today admit they never placed my money in one.

They handed me back the deposit - as a 'good will gesture' as they know that I know the legal implications (should have been deposited into one of three schemes within 14 days and given a certificate etc).

I have the money back now and I am happy. But I wish to complain.

Out of interest, who is the best person to complain to? This by the way is a huge UK estate/letting agent and each shop is a franchise.

Can I still claim three times the amount even though I have vacated?

The LL has taken the property off the books so dont think I can demand him name/address within 21 days?

Surely there must be something to be done?

I am the usual type to let stuff lay but this LA is a horror - they wouldnt fix things, they let me go for weeks without a boiler/hot water before arranging a call out, never supplied the CORGI certs, the manager called me and told me I was a nuisance and she wished I never lived there. She told me to my face that the deposit was in a scheme, she lied to me and I cant believe the company/franchise branch will get away with it.

 

Please, does anyone have sme advice?

Thank you,

N.

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I’ll forgive you for not being legally qualified.

 

Does this mean you are, or are you just a layman like I am? Unless you say you are qualified I will assume that your knowlege of the law is not formally taught and you are not legally qualified.

 

Firstly, in brief, the Legislator and any associated parties must at various junctures outline the basis for their legislative proposals as a fundamental part of the enactment process. In the case of the Tenancy Deposit Order 2007, we are lucky enough to have the rather useful explantory memorandum, and I’m sure you’ll find it rather interesting once you read it. New legislation simply cannot be introduced without it’s requirement and worthiness having been sufficiently demonstrated to the Lords and for this information to be made publicy available.

 

The explanatory notes for the TDO 2007 only cover it's modifications. Do you have a link/location of the notes for the TDS sections of the HA 2004?

 

You've previously stated that "The spirit of the law, and the reason for the Legislator drafting this interesting piece of legislation, is to force all landlords to undertake the handling of a tenancy deposit in the correct and appropriate manner from the commencement of the tenancy and to the end.". I would be interested to know where you have got this from.

 

From the various sources I've read the main benefit of a TDS comes when the tenancy ends as it ensures a means of arbitration for deposit disputes which does not require court involvement. Therefore I would suggest that the spirit of this law is to ensure that this method of arbitration is available at the end of the tenancy and if the LL protects the deposit before the tenancy ends the spirit of the law has been complied with.

 

Secondly, section 214(4) is specifically introduced within The Act with express reference to section 213. The preceeding section is therefore the only section that possesses any relevance to 214. In the event of an application to the Court, the requirement for the Court to order payment of the penalty turns solely on whether the provisions in sections 213(1), 213(3) and 213(6) were met at the time when the landlord received the deposit from the tenant. I really cannot see how there could be any other way to interpret section 214. It’s one of the simplest legislative provisions I’ve ever had the pleasure of reading.

 

I've double checked my copy of the HA 2004 and S214(4) makes no reference to S213. The only references to S213 from S214 are the following;

 

S214(1) refers to S213(10) for a definition of relevant person.

 

S214(1)(a) refers to S213(4) for a definition of the initial requirements of an authorised scheme, and refers to S213(6)(a) to cover the provision of information to the tenant (but it does not refer to S213(6)(b) which specifies the 14 day timeframe).

 

S214(2)(a) refers to S213(6)(a) again to cover writen notice to the tenant (but again it does not refer to S213(6)(b) which specifies the 14 day timeframe).

 

S214(5) refers to S213(7) allow the court to issue an order to recover non-monetry deposits.

 

S214(6) refers to S213( 8 ) for a definition of deposit.

 

If you can provide me with a reference where S214 refers explicitly to S213(6)(b) which states the 14 day timeframe I would be grateful, otherwise the more I look at it the more I come to the conclusion that applications for the penalty made under S214 may not be successful because the 14 day timeframe is not specified or referenced as grounds for an application to court as stated in S214(1).

 

Furthermore, a Judicial decision to not award costs is also one which can be appealed. There is absolutely no requirement under the Housing Act 2004 or any supposed expectation of conduct for the tenant to attempt to coerce or mediate with the landlord before legal proceedings commence. Nor would there be any basis in law for a Court to refuse a claim for costs in the absence of any such quite unnecessary endeavours.

 

There is an absolultley solid basis in law for refusing costs, and it's clearly written in Rule 44.3 of the Civil Procedure Rules. You can find this at PART 44 - GENERAL RULES ABOUT COSTS

 

It clearly states in 44.3(4)(a) that the conduct of the parties is one of three factors relevant in determining if costs should be awarded, 44.3(5)(a) covers whether pre-action protocol has been followed (i.e. a letter before action), and 44.3(5)© covers the manner in which a party has persued a case (i.e. entering into mediation).

 

Again, if you know better please provide links to the relevant statutes which override this.

Edited by RentedAndRankled
Typo - It's party not part :)
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There is an absolultley solid basis in law for refusing costs, and it's clearly written in Rule 44.3 of the Civil Procedure Rules. You can find this at PART 44 - GENERAL RULES ABOUT COSTS

 

It clearly states in 44.3(4)(a) that the conduct of the parties is one of three factors relevant in determining if costs should be awarded, 44.3(5)(a) covers whether pre-action protocol has been followed (i.e. a letter before action), and 44.3(5)© covers the manner in which a party has persued a case (i.e. entering into mediation).

 

Again, if you know better please provide links to the relevant statutes which override this.

 

Tenancy deposit claims are dealt with under Part 8 procedures (N208 Form ). This is allocated to the fast track not the small claims track. Costs are therefore awardable under Part 46 of CPR and are listed.

 

PART 46 - FAST TRACK TRIAL COSTS

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