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Due to the interest shown in the subject of Mandatory Work Activity (MWA) I thought it would be appropriate to open a thread devoted exclusively to the topic. I apologise to those interested parties for any part I might have played in the abrupt termination of the previous one.

Any constructive discussion of MWA will be greatly helped by a nodding acquaintance with the Mandatory Work Activity Provider Guidance.

It can be accessed via this link:

 

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/300734/pg-part-p.pdf

 

It might also be useful to trace right from the start the steps that have to be taken by the Jobcentres or advisers before they recommend to claimants that they should participate in it.

 

It used to be the case that Post Work Programme Support (PWPS) applied to those claiming JSA at the point their participation in the Work Programme ends.

 

That is no longer the case. PWPS now only applies to JSA claimants whose participation in the Work Programme (WP) ended prior to 28th April 2014. Claimants whose participation in the WP ended after that date are now put on the Help to Work (HtW) scheme.

 

The first step after exiting the WP for PWPS participants is for the WP Provider to send the claimant and the Jobcentre an Exit Report. This Report should contain details of the provision or ‘help’ that the Provider provided to the claimant whilst on WP. It should also specify any further steps or ‘help’ that the Provider has identified as being necessary to improve the claimant’s prospects of finding or getting into gainful employment.

 

In my own case, I am still awaiting that Exit Report, over a year later. I went to the Provider several times to ask for it, nay demand it, but was fobbed off each time. They insisted that it was the Jobcentre’s responsibility to provide me with a copy. I showed them the Guidance, which forms a part of their contractual arrangements, which states categorically that it is their responsibility but they had never seen it before, they said, and anyway nobody ever made such a fuss about it before. The Jobcentre adviser would not give me a copy, even a photocopy of his own, saying it was not up to them to provide me with it.

 

I finally managed to get a copy, months later, via a Subject Access Request (SAR). Well I need not have bothered; there was absolutely nothing in it about anything they identified as being necessary to improve my prospects of finding or getting into gainful employment, that part of the Report was blank. There was a whole raft of stuff that they claimed to have done for me whilst on the WP, most of which was rubbish and had not been done.

 

So the very first step was botched, which may be insignificant in itself but the significance of which becomes apparent when we get to step two, the Work Programme Completer Interview (WPCI).

 

I believe a claimant would be justified in looking on this oversight as an example of maladministration and registering a formal complaint straight away at this point. I believe that by allowing it to pass the advisers get the impression that the claimant is ignorant of the rules and/or submissive and therefore a sitting duck for the far from regulation treatment yet to come.

 

Anyway, back to the plot and onto step two, the Work Programme Completer Interview (WPCI). During the WPCI the adviser must decide what sort of PWPS is appropriate for the claimant. Remember that the support is supposed to be tailored to the individual needs of the claimant; well you can forget that straight away, it’s a joke.

 

There are two groups available to the adviser and he/she has to assign the claimant to one or the other:

 

 

  1. Jobcentre Plus Offer (JCP Offer)
  2. Mandatory Intervention Regime (MIR)

 

Assignment to the JCP Offer is recommended for those claimants who have:

 

  1. recent, relevant work experience (paid, voluntary or a work placement) with which to populate their CV
  2. demonstrated an ability to pro-actively seek employment
  3. demonstrated work-related disciplines and behaviours
  4. no significant challenges to overcome in securing employment

 

Assignment to MIR is recommended for those claimants who are less ‘jobready’ because they have multiple or more complex challenges to overcome, and therefore need additional intensive support to enhance their prospects of securing sustainable employment.

 

MIR is delivered flexibly but, as well as increased interventions, could include:

 

  1. Interventions undertaken by specialist advisers
  2. Case conferencing with Work Psychologists
  3. Targeted group sessions
  4. SMART action planning and robust follow-up supported by Jobseeker’s Directions as appropriate
  5. Mock interviews and/or application form completion
  6. Strengthening the conditionality message
  7. Rigorous skills assessment and measures to address gaps identified.

 

Claimants who were assigned to MIR will also be the ones that are likely to be referred onto MWA.

 

Now then, there I was, assigned to MIR and without a clue as to how I got there. There is nothing in the Exit Report to assist the adviser in determining which grouping I should be assigned to. He asked me at the WPCI what my barriers to getting a job were. I told him that I had none and asked what the WP Providers, who were supposed to give me and him the benefit of their considered and qualified opinion, said in their Report. He said that they said nothing about it to which I replied that I had been with them for the last two years and if they say nothing then I have to accept that and agree that nothing is wrong with me, and could it perhaps be that there is something wrong with them. He took nothing I said into account when deciding which group to assign me to. I believe the decision was taken long before the interview took place. He was far more concerned at the interview, and at the many to follow, with getting me to alter my Jobseeker’s Agreement and allow him access to my Universal Jobmatch Account and tell me of the multitude of things that I could be sanctioned for. Maladministration by this stage in the game had become par for the course.

 

That’s a brief summation of how I got to the stage where I became a candidate for MWA. Most JSA claimants who finished the WP prior to the 28th April 2014 will probably find it familiar.

 

The next step is the actual selection for referral to MWA.

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The following extracts from the Guidance provide answers to questions about what MWA is supposed to be about and how the referral process is supposed to work. They also confirm that the claimant as an individual has no input in the decision to refer him/her, and that once referred he/she can’t refuse. Nor can a claimant volunteer, he/she has to be referred by an adviser.

 

Features of MWA

 

“MWA provides, for up to 30 hours a week (unless restrictions have been agreed), for four weeks, a community benefit work placement”.

 

“It is up to advisers and their managers to decide who is appropriate for referral to MWA”.

 

“MWA is mandatory for all claimants who are referred. There is no voluntary access to MWA”.

 

The placements sourced by the provider will:

 

  1. Last for 4 weeks
  2. Be for 30hrs per week, unless restrictions apply, so allowing the claimant time to meet their actively seeking obligations
  3. Be reduced in line with any restrictions a claimant might have on their Jobseeker’s Agreement. In such circumstances, placements will take up 75% of the time a claimant is available for work.
  4. Be of benefit to the local or wider community
  5. Be additional to any existing or expected vacancies the host organisation might have.
     
    MWA participants will continue to claim JSA and attend Jobsearch Reviews
     
    The provider will meet the costs incurred by the claimant in attending the MWA placement. This will include travel, childcare and replacement adult care costs. The provider will also meet any additional support costs necessary to allow disabled people to participate fully.
     
    Identifying claimants suitable for MWA

 

It is at the Advisory Team’s discretion whether to refer JSA claimant to MWA, bearing in mind the policy intent as detailed below:

 

A JSA claimant potentially suitable for MWA is one identified through the work targeted interview process as lacking, or failing to demonstrate, the focus and discipline necessary to effectively:

 

  1. Seek out and pursue job opportunities
  2. Secure and retain employment.

 

MWA participation would only be beneficial, and therefore appropriate, if it were deployed as a step within a structured approach designed to address the claimant’s multiple barriers. Deployed in isolation, or as the first or primary step, MWA would be wholly inappropriate.

 

Introducing MWA to Claimants

A referral to MWA must never come as a surprise to a claimant. If a claimant’s circumstances suggest that they may be suitable for a referral to MWA, the adviser must:

 

  1. Explain to the claimant that they are being considered for referral and the reasons why i.e. to develop skills, disciplines and behaviours that are widely valued by employers and that can help them in seeking employment.
  2. Provide an overview of the provision to the claimant
  3. Explain to the claimant that the case for referring them will be discussed with the Advisory Team Manager in line with district implantation protocols to support MWA.
  4. Explain to the claimant that if they are subsequently referred to MWA, their participation will become mandatory when the provider issues them with a notice in writing containing details of the placement, i.e. they may face a benefit sanction if they do not take part.
  5. Record, as an LMS conversation, that the discussion with the claimant has taken place and the reasons cited for considering an MWA referral.

NB. The language and tone used when discussing MWA with claimants is crucial. MWA must never be used as a threat or portrayed as a punitive measure.

 

That is what should happen. Claimants who have been referred to MWA will recognise some of the preceding extracts from personal experience. In my own case, and many others I know of, most of it never happened, it was not until much later that I realised maladministration big time was being practiced to push me onto MWA.

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The following extracts from the Guidance provide answers to questions about what MWA is supposed to be about and how the referral process is supposed to work. They also confirm that the claimant as an individual has no input in the decision to refer him/her, and that once referred he/she can’t refuse. Nor can a claimant volunteer, he/she has to be referred by an adviser.

 

Features of MWA

 

“MWA provides, for up to 30 hours a week (unless restrictions have been agreed), for four weeks, a community benefit work placement”.

 

“It is up to advisers and their managers to decide who is appropriate for referral to MWA”.

 

“MWA is mandatory for all claimants who are referred. There is no voluntary access to MWA”.

 

The placements sourced by the provider will:

 

  1. Last for 4 weeks
  2. Be for 30hrs per week, unless restrictions apply, so allowing the claimant time to meet their actively seeking obligations
  3. Be reduced in line with any restrictions a claimant might have on their Jobseeker’s Agreement. In such circumstances, placements will take up 75% of the time a claimant is available for work.
  4. Be of benefit to the local or wider community
  5. Be additional to any existing or expected vacancies the host organisation might have.
     
    MWA participants will continue to claim JSA and attend Jobsearch Reviews
     
    The provider will meet the costs incurred by the claimant in attending the MWA placement. This will include travel, childcare and replacement adult care costs. The provider will also meet any additional support costs necessary to allow disabled people to participate fully.
     
    Identifying claimants suitable for MWA

 

It is at the Advisory Team’s discretion whether to refer JSA claimant to MWA, bearing in mind the policy intent as detailed below:

 

A JSA claimant potentially suitable for MWA is one identified through the work targeted interview process as lacking, or failing to demonstrate, the focus and discipline necessary to effectively:

 

  1. Seek out and pursue job opportunities
  2. Secure and retain employment.

 

MWA participation would only be beneficial, and therefore appropriate, if it were deployed as a step within a structured approach designed to address the claimant’s multiple barriers. Deployed in isolation, or as the first or primary step, MWA would be wholly inappropriate.

 

Introducing MWA to Claimants

A referral to MWA must never come as a surprise to a claimant. If a claimant’s circumstances suggest that they may be suitable for a referral to MWA, the adviser must:

 

  1. Explain to the claimant that they are being considered for referral and the reasons why i.e. to develop skills, disciplines and behaviours that are widely valued by employers and that can help them in seeking employment.
  2. Provide an overview of the provision to the claimant
  3. Explain to the claimant that the case for referring them will be discussed with the Advisory Team Manager in line with district implantation protocols to support MWA.
  4. Explain to the claimant that if they are subsequently referred to MWA, their participation will become mandatory when the provider issues them with a notice in writing containing details of the placement, i.e. they may face a benefit sanction if they do not take part.
  5. Record, as an LMS conversation, that the discussion with the claimant has taken place and the reasons cited for considering an MWA referral.

NB. The language and tone used when discussing MWA with claimants is crucial. MWA must never be used as a threat or portrayed as a punitive measure.

 

That is what should happen. Claimants who have been referred to MWA will recognise some of the preceding extracts from personal experience. In my own case, and many others I know of, most of it never happened, it was not until much later that I realised maladministration big time was being practiced to push me onto MWA.

All of the people frm my work programme in my area were put on MIR

TJR JNR

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All of the people frm my work programme in my area were put on MIR

 

 

I have not come across or heard of anyone being assigned to JCP Offer either. I recall my adviser telling me that he was told to assign every claimant coming off WP to MIR

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So far we have looked at the actions that an adviser should take in order to assign a claimant to the grouping that he/she should be in to be considered for referral to MWA. Then we looked at the features of MWA, what the adviser has to consider before deciding to refer a claimant, and then the way in which the adviser is required to inform the claimant how and why he/she has been selected for MWA.

 

At this stage the next step is for the adviser to actually refer the claimant to a Placement Provider.

 

Referral Process

 

The decision to refer a claim to MWA provision must be seen to be fair and reasonable; it must have been made following consultation between the claimant’s Personal Adviser and Advisory Team Manager and the fact that the consultation took place must be recorded as a LMS conversation.

 

It is vitally important for the Personal Adviser to confirm, by review of the Customer Assessment Tool for example, that the reasons for considering referral in the first instance remain valid.

 

What is this Customer Assessment Tool? My adviser never mentioned it at the time. When I learnt about it and asked about it afterwards, my adviser could not tell me anything about it, nor could he say whether or not he reviewed it. So much for it being ‘vitally important’.

 

The referral must be made within an adviser interview (a flexible intervention interview should be used).

 

The adviser undertaking the referral must take the following actions:

 

Step 1. Explain to the claimant:

 

  1. About Back to Work Schemes
  2. Why they are being referred
  3. That the case for referring them has been discussed, and agreed, by the Advisory Team Manager
  4. What the provision entails
  5. How we expect them to benefit from the provision
  6. That any travel and/or care costs they incur will be met by the provider.
     
    Step 2. The next action will depend whether the claimant has a Jobseeker’s Agreement (JSAg) or a JSA Claimant Commitment (CC):
     
    JSAg – ensure that the claimant’s JSAg and Action Plan are fully up to date.
     
    JSA CC – ensure that the claimant’s Action Plan (AP) “Aims” free text box has the following information:

 

  1. Annotate “JSA Claimant Commitment Case”
  2. Input types of Work from the CC Jobseeker Profile
  3. Input any availability or work restrictions agreed on the CC
     
    Steps 3 & 4. These steps involve the adviser filling in or updating computer forms for admin purposes and need not be spelled out by me here.
     
    Step 5. Issue the LMS generated referral letter MWA05/MWA05W and explain its contents ensuring the claimant fully understands that:

 

  1. The provision is mandatory and the consequences of non-attendance
  2. The MWA provider will write to them within 15 working days to give them full details of the placement arranged, what they are required to do and the consequences of failing to do so.
  3. They must continue to follow the steps to find work as set out in their JSAg/ JSA CC.
  4. They must continue to attend fortnightly Jobsearch Reviews. (At adviser discretion, the claimant’s signing time, but not the day, can be rearranged to fit better with attending MWA. Similarly, any requirement to attend weekly can be waived during the MWA period.
  5. They must inform their Advisory Services Team if they need to change their signing time once the details of their placement are known.
     
    NB. Although the MWA 05 letter must be issued to the claimant, it is not the letter that contains the text necessary to support the mandatory nature of the provision. That text will be contained in a letter, issued by the provider, giving the claimant the details of their placement.
     
    Step 6. Record, as an LMS conversation, that the letter MWA 05 has been issued to the claimant.
     
    Step 7. Alert the provider to issues which impact upon the claimant’s participation.
     
    Step 8. Make arrangements to follow-up the referral.

So there we are, during this interview the adviser will be entering details onto computer files, he/she will also contact a placement provider on the phone to arrange the referral. By the end of the interview the claimant will have been referred and be in possession of the MWA 05 letter. Here again, claimants who have gone through the referral process will recognise some of this. Some will also realise that some of it was not done.

 

The claimant then awaits and looks forward to being contacted by the placement provider. In my own case that came two days later.

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We have now got to the stage where we are awaiting the call or contact from the MWA Provider. The Provider must follow the following procedures:

 

This is the action that you (the Provider) need to take to ensure a claimant starts MWA. Prior to this, the Jobcentre Plus personal adviser will have identified a suitable claimant, told them about the referral and that you will be in touch to confirm their placement start date.

 

  1. Engage with the claimant
  2. Issue official start notification
  3. Ensure PRaP is updated appropriately within 24 hours
     
    You have 15 working days from the Jobcentre Plus referral to ensure a suitable community benefit placement is sourced and the claimant starts the placement.
     
    You must source placements across a range of sectors.
     
    It is not necessary (although it’s desirable wherever possible) for the placement to be in the same sector or type of work as the claimant’s job goal, as MWA is designed to help the claimant develop disciplines associated with employment. Claimants cannot choose their placements.
    In cases where the claimant has an availability restriction agreed, the MWA placement will take up 75% of this time (e.g. if a claimant is only required to be available for work for 20 hours a week, they should spend 15 hours a week on the MWA placement). Any restrictions will be part of the information that Jobcentre Plus sends to you through PRaP.
     
    Placements must be additional to any existing or expected vacancies. You must ensure that employers are not taking advantage of MWA as a source of labour at the expense of employing workers in the open labour market.
     
    It is vital that the placements are of community benefit. You must seek clearance from your performance manager before placing any claimants in a private sector placement.
     
    Prior to start you are required to conduct engagement activity with the claimant.
     
    How the engagement activity is undertaken is at your discretion but it must include as a minimum:

 

  1. the issuing of a formal notification letter
  2. details of the work placement including start date and time, duration of placement, hours of attendance, location;
  3. the claimant’s responsibilities while on placement;
  4. the consequences of failure to participate and MWA sanction regime;
  5. the requirement for the claimant to continue to attend Fortnightly Job Search Review (FJR) and to be actively seeking and available for work.
     
    The initial notification letter must be issued in hard copy. It is not acceptable to use electronic methods such as email or text. You may hand the letter direct to the claimant, or send it by post. You should keep a record of how and when the letter was issued to the claimant.
     
    You must allow reasonable notice between the date of issuing the notification and the work placement start date. If the letter is posted, you must allow sufficient time for the notification to reach the claimant after date of postage. By convention, a letter sent by first class post, is deemed to have been received on the second working day after posting (Saturdays, Sundays and Bank Holidays are not included). For example, if you are telling a claimant to start their work placement on a Monday, you must have posted their letter by first class post on the Wednesday of the previous week at the very latest. Longer time frames will be needed if writing to the claimant by second-class post.
     
    If the claimant tells you that they cannot attend their work placement on the start date, you may change the details in the formal notification letter which you must then re-issue to the claimant. You must also take action as per Para 6.8 re possible DMA action.
     
    If the claimant fails to engage, you must still issue them with the formal notification. Any record of engagement activity should be kept in case a doubt is raised if the claimant subsequently fails to start their work placement (in which case you would take action as per Para 6.8 re possible DMA action). You should note, however, that attending a session (e.g. induction or similar) that is not part of the four week work placement, is not mandatory. You should therefore not raise a doubt if the claimant fails to attend such an activity.
     
    You (the claimant) are now ready to start your MWA placement if you are satisfied that all the procedures up to this stage have been correctly applied.

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Here are a few points to bear in mind while on the placement. It is up to you not to let yourself be exploited or abused. In such an eventuality it would not be considered a failure to participate on your part if you walked out and left the placement.

 

The MWA Placement

 

The placements delivered through MWA should include activity that provides direct or indirect benefit to the local community. You should be able to clearly describe to DWP the community benefits the placement is delivering.

 

Each claimant is expected to participate fully in a placement which will last four weeks, for up to 30 hours per week (unless restrictions have been agreed). With the claimant’s agreement, the placement can include weekend working.

 

The days and hours of the placement are not prescriptive, but they should adhere to the Working Time Regulations 1998.

 

Time spent travelling to and from the placement does not form part of the hours of attendance on the placement. Where there are no agreed restrictions all MWA placements are for 30 hours per week activity and within 90 minutes travel by public transport of the client’s home address.

 

The Provider or the placement host must not give any incentive payments or rewards to the claimant for participation in MWA.

 

It is acceptable for claimants to complete their allotted time on more than one placement, so long as they complete four weeks in total, and evidence is kept of the reason for placement transfer. We would expect a timely transition from one placement to another, enabling the claimant to complete their, up to 30 hours (less if restrictions have been agreed), that week where possible.

 

The Provider must supply a contact landline telephone number for the claimant to use to contact them while they are on their MWA placement.

 

 

Now that you are armed with some facts and information that should help you to ensure that you are not hoodwinked onto MWA all that’s left to say now is

ENJOY.

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Here are a few points to bear in mind while on the placement. It is up to you not to let yourself be exploited or abused. In such an eventuality it would not be considered a failure to participate on your part if you walked out and left the placement.

 

The MWA Placement

 

The placements delivered through MWA should include activity that provides direct or indirect benefit to the local community. You should be able to clearly describe to DWP the community benefits the placement is delivering.

 

Each claimant is expected to participate fully in a placement which will last four weeks, for up to 30 hours per week (unless restrictions have been agreed). With the claimant’s agreement, the placement can include weekend working.

 

The days and hours of the placement are not prescriptive, but they should adhere to the Working Time Regulations 1998.

 

Time spent travelling to and from the placement does not form part of the hours of attendance on the placement. Where there are no agreed restrictions all MWA placements are for 30 hours per week activity and within 90 minutes travel by public transport of the client’s home address.

 

The Provider or the placement host must not give any incentive payments or rewards to the claimant for participation in MWA.

 

It is acceptable for claimants to complete their allotted time on more than one placement, so long as they complete four weeks in total, and evidence is kept of the reason for placement transfer. We would expect a timely transition from one placement to another, enabling the claimant to complete their, up to 30 hours (less if restrictions have been agreed), that week where possible.

 

The Provider must supply a contact landline telephone number for the claimant to use to contact them while they are on their MWA placement.

 

 

Now that you are armed with some facts and information that should help you to ensure that you are not hoodwinked onto MWA all that’s left to say now is

ENJOY.

When do you start yours?

TJR JNR

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When do you start yours?

 

 

I did my 4 weeks last December.

 

 

It wasn't until I finished that I learnt most of the above.

 

 

At the time I was confronted with the whole process of referral at one interview in one day. They told me it was not negotiable and, not knowing any better at the time, I fell for it.

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I did my 4 weeks last December.

 

 

It wasn't until I finished that I learnt most of the above.

 

 

At the time I was confronted with the whole process of referral at one interview in one day. They told me it was not negotiable and, not knowing any better at the time, I fell for it.

So where did u do your 4 weeks? And what happens when u sign on? Coz when i do it the jobcentre in my village is far frm where its likely i be sent as there is nothing much in my village - it is over the road from where the British Open Golf is held in 2 weeks so not many buisnesses or charities here mainly just small country pubs an corner shops

TJR JNR

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I suppose they could get me to sign on first thing then get to my placement as soon as is possible - i know some people have been sent to the Recycling Plant for Wirral for MWA and MWS - MWS is the exact same only its used for young people with no work experience or single

Parents whos kids have reached a certain age -if i get sent their i would have to get 2 trains and a bus as it is out in the stick like where im from so id have to get a train into city centre then train to town nearest the plant then a bus frm their to the actual plant so days i sign on will be

Difficult

TJR JNR

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Oh and what happens when u finish ? Just go back to MIR? Do you know if they can make you do MWA again after a period of time? Hope not but wouldnt suprise me - i know my mums neighbours son did MWS an then did it again 9 months later as the guidelines said then that if they havnt sent them on any other work activity for a minimum of 6 months they could repeat it so they did

TJR JNR

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TJ: Apologies for delay, and to answer your questions;

 

I did the first 2 weeks at one site, supposed to be recycling UPVC window and door frames. The site was privately owned and run by a couple of shysters. Every law in the book was broken there as well as some that are not in the book.

 

The second two weeks was at another privately owned recycling plant. Here skips full of mostly rubbish came in and had to be sorted, plastics, metal, wood, stones, bricks, paper etc. had to be separated. In some cases this could be done when the skip was tipped. In other cases where the rubbish was mixed in with soil a machine like a huge tumble drier extracted the soil and the rubbish was then deposited from that machine onto a huge conveyer belt and sorted by hand. Here again, health and safety laws, hygiene laws, employment laws, DWP regulations were treated with more contempt than the rubbish.

 

Altogether the experience did nothing to prepare me or anyone else there for any kind of job that I had ever seen or heard of except in documentaries about sweat shop conditions in Third World Countries. The conditions had to be seen to be believed. That this could go on in 21st century England was an eye-opener to me.

 

Despite all the travails I completed the placement. I followed the complaints procedure, made a formal complaint, but nothing much came of it apart from a lot of hassle. There are still issues outstanding so it may not be too wise to say too much more here at this time.

 

You asked about signing on while on MWA:

 

Like you, my placement was quite far away from where I currently live and sign on so arrangements had to be made to cater for that.

 

My signing on time prior to starting MWA was 11.30 am. I arranged to change this to 4.30 pm. For the 2 signing on days that fell in the 4 week period I attended the placement in the morning and took the afternoon off. I arranged this with the adviser before starting and with the people in charge at the placement on my first day there. Nobody raised any objection to that arrangement, and it suited me.

 

The other option was to have the morning off, sign on first thing in the morning, then get to the placement in the afternoon.

 

Remember, if your travel time by public transport is more than 90 mins, that includes time taken in changing buses, trains, etc. you have the right to refuse the placement and no action can be taken against you for refusing.

 

You asked what happens when you finish MWA.

 

Below is what the Guidance says should happen:

 

Claimants completing MWA

For MWA completers it is important that the Advisory Team conduct a post-provision review. The review should focus on the claimant’s experience of MWA and their needs moving forward. Any steps agreed must be recorded on the claimant’s Jobseeker’s Agreement

 

The MWA provider will also give feedback on the claimant’s participation. This should be received within 10 days of the completion date and will document the claimant’s activities during placement, verify attendance and note any skills developed. This feedback should be shared with the claimant.

 

In my case that certainly did not happen. I went back to the fortnightly signing on and the constant nagging about UJ and CC. The day I left the second placement I informed the powers that be there that it was my last day. They were already aware of it. I was also offered a cash ‘sweetener’ which I accepted. It was only later that I found out that it was illegal for them to make that offer, there is nothing in the rules to suggest that it was illegal for me to accept.

 

Claimants could be mandated more than once, that is up to the adviser to decide. In my own case, knowing what I know now, I am prepared and ready to resist even a hint of mandating me again.

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Yea i thought so this is the last process for people claiming Jsa so i had a feeling they could send u bk to MWA more than once im sure i remember reading they have to wait at least 6 months have past since u last did any work related activity before doing so tho - also i know at my jobcentre they're not sending people to MWA who are doing their own Voluntary Work

TJR JNR

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TJ: Apologies for delay, and to answer your questions;

 

I did the first 2 weeks at one site, supposed to be recycling UPVC window and door frames. The site was privately owned and run by a couple of shysters. Every law in the book was broken there as well as some that are not in the book.

 

The second two weeks was at another privately owned recycling plant. Here skips full of mostly rubbish came in and had to be sorted, plastics, metal, wood, stones, bricks, paper etc. had to be separated. In some cases this could be done when the skip was tipped. In other cases where the rubbish was mixed in with soil a machine like a huge tumble drier extracted the soil and the rubbish was then deposited from that machine onto a huge conveyer belt and sorted by hand. Here again, health and safety laws, hygiene laws, employment laws, DWP regulations were treated with more contempt than the rubbish.

 

Altogether the experience did nothing to prepare me or anyone else there for any kind of job that I had ever seen or heard of except in documentaries about sweat shop conditions in Third World Countries. The conditions had to be seen to be believed. That this could go on in 21st century England was an eye-opener to me.

 

Despite all the travails I completed the placement. I followed the complaints procedure, made a formal complaint, but nothing much came of it apart from a lot of hassle. There are still issues outstanding so it may not be too wise to say too much more here at this time.

 

You asked about signing on while on MWA:

 

Like you, my placement was quite far away from where I currently live and sign on so arrangements had to be made to cater for that.

 

My signing on time prior to starting MWA was 11.30 am. I arranged to change this to 4.30 pm. For the 2 signing on days that fell in the 4 week period I attended the placement in the morning and took the afternoon off. I arranged this with the adviser before starting and with the people in charge at the placement on my first day there. Nobody raised any objection to that arrangement, and it suited me.

 

The other option was to have the morning off, sign on first thing in the morning, then get to the placement in the afternoon.

 

Remember, if your travel time by public transport is more than 90 mins, that includes time taken in changing buses, trains, etc. you have the right to refuse the placement and no action can be taken against you for refusing.

 

You asked what happens when you finish MWA.

 

Below is what the Guidance says should happen:

 

Claimants completing MWA

For MWA completers it is important that the Advisory Team conduct a post-provision review. The review should focus on the claimant’s experience of MWA and their needs moving forward. Any steps agreed must be recorded on the claimant’s Jobseeker’s Agreement

 

The MWA provider will also give feedback on the claimant’s participation. This should be received within 10 days of the completion date and will document the claimant’s activities during placement, verify attendance and note any skills developed. This feedback should be shared with the claimant.

 

In my case that certainly did not happen. I went back to the fortnightly signing on and the constant nagging about UJ and CC. The day I left the second placement I informed the powers that be there that it was my last day. They were already aware of it. I was also offered a cash ‘sweetener’ which I accepted. It was only later that I found out that it was illegal for them to make that offer, there is nothing in the rules to suggest that it was illegal for me to accept.

 

Claimants could be mandated more than once, that is up to the adviser to decide. In my own case, knowing what I know now, I am prepared and ready to resist even a hint of mandating me again.

I just found an old thread for MWA its on page 2 if u do a search for pwps

TJR JNR

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Thought u might find the link I put into the last thread helpful :D

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The SabreSheep, All information is offered on good faith and based on mine and others experiences. I am not a qualified legal professional and you should always seek legal advice if you are unsure of your position.

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Thank you for the directions TJ.

 

 

Yes Sabresheep, the document found via the link that you provided was helpful. Indeed some of the detail from earlier posts on this thread have been drawn from that document.

 

 

It is always helpful to scrutinise and gather as much information as possible on topics under discussion. It increases our understanding of, and on occasion, adds legitimacy to what is being put forward.

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  • 2 weeks later...
Thank you for the directions TJ.

 

 

Yes Sabresheep, the document found via the link that you provided was helpful. Indeed some of the detail from earlier posts on this thread have been drawn from that document.

 

 

It is always helpful to scrutinise and gather as much information as possible on topics under discussion. It increases our understanding of, and on occasion, adds legitimacy to what is being put forward.

Are you still just signing on every 2 weeks since you completed mwa then?

TJR JNR

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Yes. Signing on every two weeks.

 

Yea same here - no doubt this could all change if Labour get in power -also i read about the Dwp thinkin about splitting Jobcentre Plus up so those with learning difficulties go to a different organisationg. Those over 50 in need of support somwhere and those who are long term unemployd somwhere else aswel so the Jobcentre plus will be just attended by younger 18-25s that can be easily placed into any min wage job to gain work experience and those recently unemployed

TJR JNR

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Is it really true that claimants are allowed to refuse weekend work whilst on MWA?

 

I suspect it all depends on what your hours of availability is in your Job Seeker's Agreement. If you have limited your hours to 9-5 Mon-Fri, then you'd have grounds to refuse weekend placements. But if your JSAg states "no restrictions, all hours all week" then you may be stuffed.

PLEASE HELP US TO KEEP THIS SITE RUNNING

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No... you can't eat my brain just yet. I need it a little while longer.

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Is it really true that claimants are allowed to refuse weekend work whilst on MWA?

 

:o

dont forget it is against the law to work more than 40 hours a week so if u do 30 hours MWA then u can only do 10 hours work max

TJR JNR

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