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Ethel Street

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Ethel Street last won the day on June 1 2019

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  1. There's government guidance on this here https://www.gov.uk/guidance/holiday-entitlement-and-pay-during-coronavirus-covid-19 Scroll down to the "Carrying annual leave into future leave years" part. My reading of it is that employers are allowed and encouraged to let you roll over holiday until next year but it appears they aren't legally required to. But I'm not an HR specialist, hopefully someone who knows more about this will come along and comment.
  2. You must put in writing to the insurer today confirming that the policy should be cancelled from 3rd September because you sold the vehicle on that date and no longer have any interest in it. Send them a copy of whatever evidence you have that the vehicle was sold. Also if they sent you a Certificate of Insurance by post when you last renewed the policy post it back to them. (Today because it's 7 days from the date you sold the vehicle and there's 7 day deadline for returning the certificate) Don't wait for your friend to write a letter to insurers, you must take action immediately
  3. Have you now formally told your insurer that the policy is to be cancelled from 3rd September?
  4. Do you have a signed confirmation of sale dated 3rd September confirming that the ownership of the vehicle transferred to your friend on 3rd September? What documents do you have confirming the sale?
  5. Every post on a thread used to be numbered consecutively, Post #1, #2, #3 etc,and this was useful for referring back to previous posts, especially on long threads. In the latest update to the forum the numbering appears to be no longer there. I cannot see any post numbers. Has the numbering been removed intentionally, or is it just lurking somewhere I can't find it?
  6. I get where you you are coming from on this but unfortunately, from the information we have so far, it doesn't appear to be the site owner's fault either. It was just something that happens in nature, not something that is anyone's fault. If you get more evidence you might be able to argue that the site owner should have known that the tree was dangerous and should have got in a tree specialist to examine it. There's a brief legal explanation of the law about falling trees here, and lots of more detailed legal explanations if you search online. https://www.fisherscogginswaters.co.
  7. Legally you cannot make a claim for injuries that might have happened but didn't. Is the person who was nearly injured you? Or someone else who was staying in the caravan? Is the caravan your permanent home or somewhere you visit for holidays etc?
  8. Yes, what BF says. Each council has its own CTR scheme so the only way to find out what has triggered the letter is to contact them. It's possible your council has sent the letter to everyone to help ensure all those entitled to claim are doing so. If so then they won't know anything about your personal circumstances, it's just coincidence that you received it shortly after changing jobs and becoming self employed. General explanation of CTR here on Citizen's Advice: https://www.citizensadvice.org.uk/benefits/help-if-on-a-low-income/help-with-your-council-tax-council-tax-reducti
  9. Where the break up has been very acrimonious it's probably best the (ex-) couple don't discuss it directly with each other. Too much emotional history and anger will get in the way of a practical way to resolve this. Maybe each of them asks a friend they can trust but who isn't so emotionally involved to have the discussions and arrange what needs to be done?
  10. Put simply, the insurance company has no rights or powers greater than those the landlord would have if the landlord had no insurance at all. And the insurer can only act, in effect, as an agent of the landlord, ie it can only do things that the landlord could do himself if he had no insurance, and whatever the insurer does is done in the name of the landlord. What's more, the insurer can (generally speaking) only take action if it has paid a claim to the landlord under the landlord's rent guarantee policy. Then it can seek to recover from you what it has paid to the landlord.
  11. If an insurance company pays out a claim to the policyholder (ie to the Landlord) under a rent guarantee policy then the insurance company is entitled to take proceedings against the tenant to recover whatever it paid to the landlord. This is a right all insurers have under any insurance policy, eg under a motor policy. (The technical legal term for it is the that the insurer has the right of "subrogation".) The insurer's right to take proceedings against the tenant is no better than the right the landlord would have had if there had been no rent guarantee insurance policy. The i
  12. You need to check with your local council planning department whether there are any special local rules about fence heights that affect your house but if not the general rule is, if I recall correctly, that boundary fences up to 2 metres high do not need planning permission. So he is probably entitled to erect a 2m high fence or wall on his boundary. I say 'probably', not 'definitely', I'm not an expert on this. It was something I looked up when my neighbours started putting up a high fence recently.
  13. OP added that (rather important!) information in post #3 - "I have an overlap of 3 days where I must start at the new job but my manager here refuses to give me annual leave for those days. "
  14. HMRC don't care how many jobs you have as long as you are declaring and paying tax on all your earnings, so the overlap doesn't matter to them. It might to OP's current NHS employer though. It looks like OP has created a problem for themself my agreeing to start the new job before the end date of their current job without asking for early release from their current employer.
  15. I thought that if you had untaken holiday owing at the day your notice expires employers had to pay for holiday days owing? That's how it worked when I left my last job (not NHS).
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