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Mortycai

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About Mortycai

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  1. King - I'm thinking the same thing, but I'm old school and I believe in loyalty and integrity - I don't want to leave him in the clart. But his attitude is leaving me with little choice.
  2. My contract states a 'week's notice'. I could leave next week and totally f**k his business. I don't want to do that. I like the guy. After 4 years I consider him a friend. But I don't need the money. And I find his intractability on this one day off quite irritating. So, is there any legislation that can back me up for taking a day denied? Thanks (Judging by Emmzzi's last employer is always right posting history, I'd be grateful if she butts out thank you)
  3. Hello good people of Consumer Action Group, thanks for having me! I find myself in a work situation that I'd really appreciate some legislation-backed-up fact. I've been working for my company manual work minimum wage for nearly 4 years, never rocked the boat, always did my best to keep everyone sweet and help out where I could when people called in sick with management. However, I now find myself in a quandary where I need to take a few days off that have been expressly disallowed by da boss. Our rota goes up a few days before it starts for every two weeks going forward. The boss still finds it acceptable however to change it willy-nilly as the needs of the business dictate. Fair enough if it's a small one-man show, but this is a multi-national. So near Christmas it becomes problematic when people with children suddenly "discover" a once in a life time children's play, or family emergency, I've always tried to help out as I'm a single childless guy. But I have something I must do on Friday 14th that demands I take the day off. I asked the boss, immediately I saw the rota go up today. NO! I said, sorry but YES!! He said review your position, I'll make you work it or give you a disciplinary. I WILL be taking it off, morally and actually. What can I do to avoid the inevitable storm and bad feeling that will result despite me giving him nearly 3 weeks notice about it? It's unfortunate in that unusually this close to Christmas there is no-one else who can cover this specific shift, but I feel given my track record of always covering everyone else with their "sudden child sickness/need to go shopping" issues, etc, that I'm morally in the right to ask for this one little day off. I am prepared to die on this hill. (I'm looking for a new job already for new year), but I don't want to leave on bad terms by just handing in my one week notice now. And then get a bad reference. Especially after 4 years of actually quite enjoying the job and feeling a mutual respect with the boss. But he's dug his heels in with this; and so have I! Any legislation to help me with my stand? Thank you. Pg
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