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    • Thank you all for your comments....   What do I do now? do I just ignore them? or is there a letter I can send?
    • Guys/gals,   There's been a misunderstanding and for that I apologise. I didn't answer the initial questions because my appeal was just a couple of days away and didn't want to get bogged down with extraneous things that were not factors. I also - perhaps erroneously - got the impression that the questions were stabs in the dark hence my "if you don't know just say" response. Plus I thought my OP answered the questions however upon re-reading it I can see it may not to non-employees. Finally,  didn't want to make myself identifiable if my employer is reading (hence my redacted OP). I wasn't intending to seem difficult.   Short version: My employee has limitless OT to spare - it just wants to restrict people to WTR limits because that's what the client wants. They're happy for me to work OT once I'm under the 17 week WTR average. My appeal has been delayed from to this week so any help is appreciated.  I am one of the protected characteristics as stated in post #14.   Longer version (including answers to questions/points raised)   Why do you think other employees are able to work paid overtime hours without prior approval from the employers? Because they're not at risk of >48 hours. I am and that's why I've been told that I must have my OT pre-authorised so that I don't >48 hours. They were happy for me to work 60+ hours a week until I did so for 3 months in a row and hit the WTR limit. That's when it came to light that the client we work for states that employees must stick to WTR and my employer appears to not want to upset the client.    Ironically, when I checked their relevant HR page everything was factual in relation to WTR, it just assumed everyone would stay in WTR and didn't mention the right to opt-out. Also, when my employer took up the fight for me with the client and explained that I'd opted out, the client reportedly said they were unaware that employees can opt out.     Have you picked arguments with the company managers previously about any issues?  Are you in a more senior position and thus more expensive?  No to both. It's simply because they don't want me to exceed WTR limitations on working hours. We work on a contract for another company who stipulate their own employees must abide by WTR and therefore we must too. My employer was initially happy for me to log as many hours as I want and only changed their mind when the client pushed back.   They're happy for me to work OT just as long as I stay under the WTR limit of no more than an average of 48 hours across 17 weeks.     The company may be doing it for your welfare - do they think you are stressed, taking too much on? They may not think your output justifies doing so many hours so can refuse. They may want to free up some OT hours so others can do a few. None of these reasons apply and there is limitless OT on offer so it's not a case of wanting to share it around. About 10% of employees do OT and the company would be delighted if it was 100%. They just don't want any one person working >48 hours. Anyone can work any hours they wish outside of their normal schedule as long as they don't breach WTR. So last week we had the situation of my employer desperately begging people to work OT as they had a massive shortfall on hours and were not going to meet their commitments to the client and everyone was eligible except me. As much as they wanted to include me, as much as they would have gleefully accepted my 20 hours of OT, they felt that they couldn't and it was lose-lose for both of us.     In summary I felt it was discriminatory because:   1) The site is open 120+ hours a week and has an open-door policy on OT - the more the better and the company constantly begs for it and falls short of client requirements for number of logged hours.   2) They're initially happy for agents to work as much OT as they want and for months on end. Until you hit the WTR limit - even if opted-out   3) They insist on forcing employees to stay within WTR limitations despite employees opting out and OT being available - in which case employees are being denied not for valid issues (eg: welfare, performance issues, limited OT hours available) but because they just don't want that particular employee working the OT that a) is available and b) ends up being unfulfilled   4) So to me, it's discrimination to admit they need the hours working, they'd be happy for me (an opted-out employee) to work them if I hadn't hit the 17 week WTR average, and are only enforcing WTR because the client wants it 5) As it stands, they'd accept requests from every employee except me to work 4pm to 11pm on Friday. Likewise, they're canvassing every employee (except me).   6) They say my opting-out of WTR doesn't give me a legal right to work >48 hours but that is exactly what it does. If you have not opted out then it is illegal for you to work >48 hours therefore opting-out absolutely gives the legal right to work >48 hours. That doesn't mean a company is obliged to offer OT when it normally wouldn't or to extend it's opening hours to accommodate an employees demands for OT but it does, by default, give the legal right to work >48 hours if they OT is available. And the OT is available at my work.   7) As far as I know I am the only person of my protected characteristic and I am also the only one prevented from working >48 hours. Maybe there's a link, maybe there isn't.    
    • Jamie [email protected]   So @MarcusRashford had to shame the government in to feeding hungry children while Boris was trying to build £150,000 treehouse for a six month old child?        and That actually should say So @MarcusRashfordhad to shame the government in to feeding hungry children while Boris was trying (to get someone else) to pay to build £150,000 treehouse for his six month old child? 
    • The move by the UK, US, Canada and Japan will "strike at the heart of Putin's war machine", the UK PM says.View the full article
    • Isnt that 'continue to apply tarifs in breach of WTO regs? As already mentioned here a couple of pages ago  ,, So just Johnsonite right wing press dog whistling to the rabid sheep and distract from Johnsons many many ongoing misdeeds. ... and look at who and where benefits - it aint the UK taxpayer.     Been re-looking at some stuff - and this warrants a fresh look .. and running yourself in circles trying to make sense of it LOL       .. like how so many remainers thought Corbuncle was a good choice .. (not that there was any choice for remainers)
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Hi All!

 

I am new to all this and getting thoroughly confused so please bear with me!

I've already started claims against my bank and 9 credit card companies mainly from advice and templates found in the national press. Hopefully I've followed the correct procedures, though I haven't adhered strictly to the timescales laid down in my letters mainly because I realised I didn't really have a clue what I was doing and how I stood legally.

I have got to the stage of pursuing my claim against Nationwide in the small claims court and they had 28 days from 30th April 2007 to a file a defence and so far I've heard nothing.

My concern is that I no nothing about the Lloyds bank ruling and feel I ought to as it seems I need to be prepared if they try to bully me into accepting a reduced offer.

I'm also unsure as to when interest applies from ( I have so far included it on my claims from the date each individual charge was posted). Am I entitled to interest from the date the claim was filed to the date it is settled in full.

How do I also go about filing a claim for all the time and materials I've incurred during the course of these claims?

Also what is a thread and what's the difference between that and a post?

Sorry to be so thick but as I said I'm new to all this.:-?

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Hi All!

 

I am new to all this and getting thoroughly confused so please bear with me!

I've already started claims against my bank and 9 credit card companies mainly from advice and templates found in the national press. Hopefully I've followed the correct procedures, though I haven't adhered strictly to the timescales laid down in my letters mainly because I realised I didn't really have a clue what I was doing and how I stood legally.

I have got to the stage of pursuing my claim against Nationwide in the small claims court and they had 28 days from 30th April 2007 to a file a defence and so far I've heard nothing.

My concern is that I no nothing about the Lloyds bank ruling and feel I ought to as it seems I need to be prepared if they try to bully me into accepting a reduced offer.

I'm also unsure as to when interest applies from ( I have so far included it on my claims from the date each individual charge was posted). Am I entitled to interest from the date the claim was filed to the date it is settled in full.

How do I also go about filing a claim for all the time and materials I've incurred during the course of these claims?

Also what is a thread and what's the difference between that and a post?

Sorry to be so thick but as I said I'm new to all this.:-?

 

Hello and welcome,

Firstly you really need to read the FAQs and the step by step instructions (linked in my sigature) These will explain the process to you. This will avoid you making costly mistakes.

 

ok I shall answer your many questions ;)

 

I haven't adhered strictly to the timescales laid down in my letters mainly because I realised I didn't really have a clue what I was doing and how I stood legally.

 

You need to stick to the timelines laid down in the step by step instructions, you can let them slip giving them more time but not less.

 

I have got to the stage of pursuing my claim against Nationwide in the small claims court and they had 28 days from 30th April 2007 to a file a defence and so far I've heard nothing.

 

This link will explain the whole MCOL process for you. Here

 

My concern is that I no nothing about the Lloyds bank ruling and feel I ought to as it seems I need to be prepared if they try to bully me into accepting a reduced offer.

This has no bearing on this or anyo other case. Read this link it explains the "victory" in its true context. here

 

 

I'm also unsure as to when interest applies from ( I have so far included it on my claims from the date each individual charge was posted). Am I entitled to interest from the date the claim was filed to the date it is settled in full.

 

Interest is applied from the date of the charge until the date of settlement but only when the claim is filed at court. So if they settle before you file a court claim you are not entitled to the Statutory Interest.

 

How do I also go about filing a claim for all the time and materials I've incurred during the course of these claims?

 

Read this link here

 

Also what is a thread and what's the difference between that and a post?

 

This is your thread and this is my post. So if you start the thread its your thread.

 

 

 

 

 

I am not a legal expert my advice is given without prejudice and is purely my opinion only. If you are in doubt please seek professional advice.

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No problem. :D

 

 

 

 

 

I am not a legal expert my advice is given without prejudice and is purely my opinion only. If you are in doubt please seek professional advice.

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