Jump to content


Hassles with T-Mobile


PlanetNiles
 Share

style="text-align: center;">  

Thread Locked

because no one has posted on it for the last 5524 days.

If you need to add something to this thread then

 

Please click the "Report " link

 

at the bottom of one of the posts.

 

If you want to post a new story then

Please

Start your own new thread

That way you will attract more attention to your story and get more visitors and more help 

 

Thanks

Recommended Posts

Okay so they claim that I owe them over a hundred quid but there are a number of costs I accrued from them being tardy in sending me bills (which prevented me from reclaiming some of the charges levvied against me). As well as a number of unlawful charges from Direct Debit refusals.

 

I've calculated, from those bills that I can find (despite keeping them all in one place I seem to be missing a few, although none of the initial 6 which I actually had to phone them to get them to send them to me; a priviledge for which I was charged) that between that which they appear to owe me and they claim I owe them I'm out of pocket by some £47.11 (excluding interest; that's a complexity too far).

 

However between my dyslexia and general stress levels I can't seem to get my head around this whole thing.

 

I literally have to get this sent out by tomorrow but I'm struggling to transform the standard letter into something I can use.

 

Help!

Link to post
Share on other sites

What is the hundred pounds made up of? Are they claiming it is for a service which you have used or is it charges etc? More info please!

Lived through bankruptcy to tell the tale! Worked in various industries and studied law at university. All advice is given in good faith only :)

Link to post
Share on other sites

Even if you only think it is around £50 owed, write to them saying you believe your account has been inflated by incorrect charges, and would like the opportunity to resolve these issues once and for all. Ask them to supply a SAR, and if they require a fee for this, to advise what they require, however if you find that there ARE such charges, you will be reclaiming any SAR fee also.

Link to post
Share on other sites

It's very complicated.

 

Part of the problem is T-Mobile's apparent inability to send bills in a timely manner. I got the phone as part of a deal inwhich I effectively recieved a low rate (£12.64/month) for the life time of the phone. However it transpired that for months 4-6, 7-9 and 10-12 I had pay at twice that rate. However I could claim back the money by sending photocopies of my bills for each period to the comapy from whom I had bought the phone (The Link), but I had to do it within a month of the date of the 6th, 9th and 12th months respectivly.

 

Due to T-Mobile's tardiness I was unable to claim the money for the first two periods and only got the third by the skin of my teeth. Therefore I'm planning on including these costs as part of my claim against them since their inability to send bills out in a timely manner caused them to accrue.

 

Then there's the criminally excessive fees due to refused Direct Debits, setting a Direct Debit back up and actually getting the bills I was due. All caused by their tardiness.

 

Meanwhile, because they won't take part payments the amount of money they claim I owe has exceeded £89, while the costs that I claim they owe me has reached almost £200.

 

However I'm unsure how strong my case is; I mean part of the money I claiming was actually from an agreement with another company... it's all very confusing.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I have heard of major problems with these kind of 'redemption' offers. As far as I know, the agreement is with the introducer to the phone deal, rather than the network operator and so the cashback would actually come from them, as opposed to T-Mobile. I see your point regarding T-Mobile not billing you on time, and therefore the problems you have incurred with getting the cash back.

 

Why were the direct debits refused? Are the claiming what you did actually owe them but at the wrong time, or did you have no money in the account at the time?

 

You also mention something about them claiming the money they were actually due - so were they over charging you? They can only bill you for what your service plan dictates, so r half price or discounted line rental offer would not form part of the contract, that would be a seperate issued redeemed from the introducer. So if they have tried to take £25 instead of the discounted £12.74 then they are right to do so? Or maybe I'm not understanding correctly?

 

My advice would be to drop the charges you believe they owe you and leave the network, get on a much better one (i.e. Orange, as I am a big fan :D ) and then go about claiming the charges back as everyone has done so with the banks etc.

 

The long and the short of it is that T-Mobile has nothing to do with the reduced line rental deal which you are talking about, and therefore you cannot hold them responsible for that. That is a seperate issue you need to take up with The Link.

Lived through bankruptcy to tell the tale! Worked in various industries and studied law at university. All advice is given in good faith only :)

Link to post
Share on other sites

I have heard of major problems with these kind of 'redemption' offers. As far as I know, the agreement is with the introducer to the phone deal, rather than the network operator and so the cashback would actually come from them, as opposed to T-Mobile. I see your point regarding T-Mobile not billing you on time, and therefore the problems you have incurred with getting the cash back.

 

Why were the direct debits refused? Are the claiming what you did actually owe them but at the wrong time, or did you have no money in the account at the time?

 

You also mention something about them claiming the money they were actually due - so were they over charging you? They can only bill you for what your service plan dictates, so r half price or discounted line rental offer would not form part of the contract, that would be a seperate issued redeemed from the introducer. So if they have tried to take £25 instead of the discounted £12.74 then they are right to do so? Or maybe I'm not understanding correctly?

 

My advice would be to drop the charges you believe they owe you and leave the network, get on a much better one (i.e. Orange, as I am a big fan :D ) and then go about claiming the charges back as everyone has done so with the banks etc.

 

The long and the short of it is that T-Mobile has nothing to do with the reduced line rental deal which you are talking about, and therefore you cannot hold them responsible for that. That is a seperate issue you need to take up with The Link.

 

I'd love to drop kick them into the next century and go pay-as-you-go.

 

However there's three months left on the contract (18month fecking contract) and I can't really afford the bill let alone the £150 serverence of contract charge.

 

As for the rest of it this is precisely why I'm so stressed about this.

 

As I see it it's a breach of contract thing; its contractually implied that I'll be able to claim back the money from the link if Tmobile bill me in a timely fashion. I feel I can argue that if Tmobile had billed my in a timely fashion I would have been able to claim the money back and avoid the DD refusal.

 

If I can't then I might as well give up now, pay the bill and apologise to my kids that we'll have to miss christmas this year.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh dear. I wish I could give you a more positive response, but you need to look at each problem in isolation - these Cashback deals are offered completely seperately from the T-Mobile contract, and failure of a third party gives no right to any set-off due to an inability to recoup the cashback for whatever reason.

 

These type of deals have been rightly ridiculed and are falling away, but some distributors continue to try it on, with consumers being unaware that the discount require them to comply with very tight requirements in order to claim from the third party, and if truth be told, have been constructed in such a way to make sure than the bulk of the claimants give up.

 

You risk trashing your credit record by not paying your bills on time. T Mobile will have no knowledge and will not care that there is a supplimentary agreeemnt providing a cashback, as they do not provide this. Your mobile phone contracts takes precedence, the fact they did not issue your bill in a timescale to suit your redemption plans is not a concern, as long as they do and it is accurate.

 

You may have a case against the firm providing the cashback, especially if you can prove T-Mobile moved the billing dates making it impossible to claim timeously, but since the bulk of the firms offering these deals don't last more than 3 years, it is seldom worth pursing them. The lesson is to learn and move on - any deal NOT offered by the originator (the network) it's not worth the paper it's written on.

Link to post
Share on other sites

If you can prove that T-Mobile sent the bills late, and this prevented you from claiming the money back from the redemption company, then you could have a case because it could be said T-Mobile fustrated the contract, and therefore voided it leaving you legally entitled to unliquidated damages (i.e. the amount would be your losses + any damages awarded by the court). However, T-Mobile is a third party in this, and obviously most contracts exclude third party liability but you may still be able to do something about it - a solicitor or citizens advice bureau would be able to look over the contracts and advise you further.

 

As for your financial situation at the moment, if you cannot afford to pay T-Mobile the amount you owe them in one go, then don't pay them - simple as that, really. You would risk some adverse credit but at the end of the day if you have no money to pay them, you can't pay them. Write to them to gain some evidence you have offered them token payments towards the debt, and if they took it further, they would be penalised for not accepting what you can afford to pay.

 

If you have three months left, put the line rental down to the lowest available package and invest in a T-Mobile, Orange or O2 pay as you go sim card (which you pick up for free at most times) and use this.

 

Don't over react and say you'll cancel christmas etc! Just be practical - don't use the phone, move the line rental down and offer them small payments to clear the debt. If they will not budge at all, wait for it to go further and then see what they do, but this could damage your credit. Can you not borrow the money from somewhere and agree to pay that back in small parts? That way, t-mobile are off your back and no bad credit.

 

In most cases, as in the bank charges, there is some speculation before accumulation - that is, you need to pay first, fight later because doing it in the reverse order can make life a bit more difficult.

 

On another note, if you are suffering from fianancial difficulties (if you cannot afford a phone bill, then I'm guessing you are) then don't suffer in silence, and seek some assistance. I'm not preaching, just offering advice :-)

Lived through bankruptcy to tell the tale! Worked in various industries and studied law at university. All advice is given in good faith only :)

Link to post
Share on other sites

 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 Caggers

    • No registered users viewing this page.

  • Have we helped you ...?


×
×
  • Create New...