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Repayable grant (DFG) on buying a property


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Eurgh, it's a total nightmare. 

So, After the worst experience of my life ever (house buying), with more stress and worries than I've ever had to encounter, finally, an offer is accepted on a property as of nearly 2 months ago. Great!!! It's way over what I wanted to pay to move somewhere, it needs more work doing to it (more replacing outdated things such as the kitchen and bathroom) than hoped for and it's taken way longer than expected. After several mini bombshells, the big one finally happens just weeks away from the estimated move date.

After the council searches were done, it came back that the previous owner was provided a council disability grant (DFG) to have work done to the property. The terms being that if they sold the property within 5 years of the work being completed, then the full amount is repayable, almost £10,000. 

The owner died and their daughter put the property on the market. Annoyingly after these searches it's just 10 months until the 5 year period. 

Am I correct in thinking that even if the owner at the time of the works died (and didn't just sell up), the amount will still be repayable regardless?

I can't put into words how desperate I am to get this move done (I'm homeless sofa surfing, health is on the decline, it's bad times). If it's right that regardless of a death it has to be repaid, isn't it fair to say that I will probably have to pay it to avoid the sale falling through? As the current owner would only have to wait a few more months before putting it on the market again and having no DFG to repay. 

Solicitor is on the case of finding out, but as always they are incredibly slow and with it being the weekend, I can't just spend 2 days sitting around not having any clue about what could happen. 

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what do the deeds say regarding this please?

 

dx

 

please don't hit Quote...just type we know what we said earlier..

DCA's view debtors as suckers, marks and mugs

NO DCA has ANY legal powers whatsoever on ANY debt no matter what it's Type

and they

are NOT and can NEVER  be BAILIFFS. even if a debt has been to court..

If everyone stopped blindly paying DCA's Tomorrow, their industry would collapse overnight... 

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Your solicitor being 'on the case' should be a good thing.

 

Is there any mention of this in your Land Registry title document? This might be a "Restriction" on the title in the proprietorship register Part B or an entry in the charges register in Part C.

 

Was there any mention of this in any document coming from the seller, or search, or communication from your solicitor when you bought the property?

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or restriction k, which on a jointly owned property can be ignored as such.

 

 

 

dx

please don't hit Quote...just type we know what we said earlier..

DCA's view debtors as suckers, marks and mugs

NO DCA has ANY legal powers whatsoever on ANY debt no matter what it's Type

and they

are NOT and can NEVER  be BAILIFFS. even if a debt has been to court..

If everyone stopped blindly paying DCA's Tomorrow, their industry would collapse overnight... 

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