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Hi All,

 

Got a Code 62 for" parking with one or more wheels on or over a footpath or any part of a road other than a carriageway".  The space  where my tires overlap the parking lines, is also a free parking space. I am wondering how to challenge this? .

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Posted (edited)

Your vehicle has wheels on the pavement. You were ticketed for having wheels on the pavement.

 

How can you challenge it? Beats me.

 

The only thing I would query is what type of parking bay that is - if it is a parking bay. It looks too narrow for a car to get inside.

Edited by Jamberson

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Posted (edited)

It looks like the bays in my council area where they allow pavement parking. Sometimes the marked bay is partly on the road and partly on the pavement. Is that the case here? I can't make out whether there are dotted lines on the pavement behind your car.

 

If that is the case I imagine the contravention is because the front wheels of your car are outside the marked bay.  It may be a free parking space where your front wheels are but it isn't marked for pavement parking, which is what you are doing. Sorry, not sure what grounds you could challenge it on.

Edited by Ethel Street

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Is this in London?  If yes, there is a blanket ban on pavement parking unless there is signage permitting it.  (Actually a bit more complicated than that, but that's the essence).

 

If elsewhere*, you seem to me to be pretty clearly outside that parking bay (if it is a parking bay).  What do the signs say?

 

*  Looks like it might be in the south-west, not London?

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So London...so no parked wheels on pavement unless specifically permitted by signage (or whatever...).

 

OP needed a (much) shorter car to stay in that "parking bay", if that's what it is. 

 

OP, what do the signs say where you were parked?

 

(I assume it's the correct contravention - front offside wheel on pavement outside "permitted bay"?  Or should it be something to do with parking outside the confines of the bay?  I don't know).

 

 

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Michael's link shows the sign - pavement parking within marked bays.

 

Car is partly outside the bay - therefore the front wheels are on the pavement where not allowed.

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Ah.  I didn't look at the link.

 

Looks like no challenge than.  Can't see the front axle and all of the front wheels plus a bit more being "de minimis".

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Council money making scheme.

Most of these bays in London are too small for 2 cars but huge for one.

So one car must park partly out of it and pay a tax which they call pcn.

Try measuring those bays for yourself, I did when they painted them in our area and so far the council, after a complaint to the ombudsman signed by lots of people   is still debating about what to do.

In the mean time i have seen some poor soul being ticketed.

Just another tax, I lost the will to fight anything related to motoring, I just pay.

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In your case it would have made too much sense to extend the bay to the lamp post considering that pedestrians wouldn't be able to use that space, but no, those (insert here what best works for you) are too obsessed with money.

One day they'll get to the end of their life and they'll regret chasing money for other people,  money that they would never see or benefit from. 

Their God is money and there's no money paradise, just money hell on earth.

Rant over, sorry.

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I believe some people actually approve of the general prohibition on parking on the pavement in London and want to see it extended further.

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Section 137 of The Highways Act 1980 applies everywhere that is not subject to the specific Traffic Order that permits kerb parking.


My time as a Police Officer and subsequently time working within the Motor Trade gives me certain insights into the problems that consumers may encounter.

I have no legal qualifications.

If you have found my post helpful, please enhance my reputation by clicking on the Heart. Thank you

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Gick said:

Section 137 of The Highways Act 1980 applies everywhere that is not subject to the specific Traffic Order that permits kerb parking.

 

But that deals with the broader offence of Obstruction and doesn't expressly make pavement parking a criminal offence. The Greater London Council (General Powers) Act 1974, s15, creates a specific offence of pavement parking in London. The London Act presumably wouldn't have been necessary if the Highways Act Obstruction offence unambiguously banned all pavement parking.

Highway Code Rule 244

You MUST NOT park partially or wholly on the pavement in London, and should not do so elsewhere unless signs permit it. Parking on the pavement can obstruct and seriously inconvenience pedestrians, people in wheelchairs or with visual impairments and people with prams or pushchairs.

Edited by Ethel Street

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Posted (edited)

In the city where I live it would be impossible to park if you couldn't park on the pavement.  Fortunately, the pavements tend to be wide.

 

When we first moved here we asked about this local practice (didn't need to do it in the city where we lived previously) and the neighbours explained that emergency vehicles wouldn't have access otherwise - the streets are narrow.  Even then, people occasionally need to move their cars to allow refuse and recycling wagons through.

 

We also live opposite a community hospital/hospice with a lot of wheelchair users.  They have no difficulty negotiating parked cars as the pavements are wide enough to allow passage.

 

EDIT: my point is that many people automatically assume that pavement parking is an obstruction - especially for wheelchair users - but that isn't necessarily so.

Edited by Manxman in exile
Clarification

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There are places other than London😋


My time as a Police Officer and subsequently time working within the Motor Trade gives me certain insights into the problems that consumers may encounter.

I have no legal qualifications.

If you have found my post helpful, please enhance my reputation by clicking on the Heart. Thank you

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1 hour ago, Gick said:

There are places other than London😋

 

But not relevant to this thread though as OP's car is parked in London 😀

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the main point is that half the car is outside the bay.

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