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jenniferdiane

bought a car from seller on ebay

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hi its not for me but my neighbour had seen a mitsubishi 4x4 l200 animal on ebay for sale,

 

There was no buy it now price or auction,

You had to ring to buy the item,

this is the item number 

 

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/MITSUBISHI-L200-ANIMAL-LAST-OWNER-15-YRS-116000-WARRANTED-MILES-UK-DELIVERY-/323670179905?nma=true&si=%2BGhlFZrspvzuVpk8jGZT9zUlAEk%3D&orig_cvip=true&nordt=true&rt=nc&_trksid=p2047675.l2557

 

So has you can see it has 12 months warranty,

 

he rang the guy in Nottinghamshire but my neighbour didn't go see the car.

told my neighbour he could pay £500 on his debit card but the remainder of £2890 had to be paid by bank transfer because he had told my neighbour that due to money laundering problems he had to do it that way?

My neighbour didnt know he just paid it,

the seller brought the car up to leeds from nottinghamshire to him.

 

within 24 hours my neighbour had noticed oil leaking, 

he rang the guy who agreed that in a few weeks the car would be picked up at not cost to him and taken for repairs.

 

a few weeks passed

my neighbour tried to ring him but he realised he had blocked his numbers.

i rang the number to which he answered

when he realised i was ringing on behalf of my neighbour he than blocked my number also.

 

my husband rang him different number he answered him,

Told my husband to tell that he will have to see him in court and he's not getting his car back,

 

we got in touch with CAB who advised him to write a letter of rejection in that case so we did.

 

No response back from him,

sent a second letter in advising him to respond or the next letter would be a letter before court,

 

Again no response Finally after the car was bought on the 9th february 2019

 

in march my neighbour got a phone call from seller saying that they are not happy because the bank had managed to get my neighbour the £500 he paid on his card but not the rest as bank transfer is classed has voluntary?

 

then said because the bank has taken £500 he will defo see him in court.

 

And also  said because he has done warranty work on car he needs to pay for that?

the car had 12 months warranty on it?

 

my neighbour had insured the car but then because it was in the garage for repairs has he thought, he cancelled his insurance

 

now on ASKMID its showing has been insured ?

Its defo not my neighbour because he cancelled it a month ago,

 

 

My neighbour is wondering is there anything he can do about this

 

I would say its theft because how can a garage have someones car then insure it themselves when they are refusing to give it back 

 

IF I HAVE SPELT ANYTHING WRONG I apologise  and for my bad grammar

i do suffer from arthritis in my hands so its quite difficult to get fullstops and commas sorry in advanced

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Sorry to be blunt, but very very rarely i have seen a 18 year old car without a leak.

That doesn't mean the engine is cooked, in fact trying to fix the leak and opening the engine to replace seals, might result in many more problems. 

I live with a drip every so often and a working engine.

18 yo cars are considered scraps in today's market.

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I scarcely know what to say.

It seems to me that your neighbour went out deliberately to commit a form of suicide and has succeeded very well.

He bought a car unseen on eBay. Relies on some undertaking that it has a warranty – who has given the warranty? What kind of insurance is therefore it? Pay £500 on a card and almost 3 grand in cash – because he believed the story about money laundering!

He didn't visit the seller to showroom but the car was delivered to his door. Then surprise surprise it starts to develop faults and then my understanding of your story is that he has then delivered the car back to the dodgy dealer but because he has managed to recover £500 on his card, the dealer is now withholding the car and may even have re-inssured it and may even be driving it around.

As I say, I scarcely know what to say and I scarcely know what to advise. You don't know anything about the dealer or whether he is accessible to a court action. I would certainly be calling the police and logging it as a theft. Of course the police will try to say that it's not a theft and it's a civil matter.

I also understand that the dodgy dealer is now saying that they have carried out some work that although it's warranty work they want paying for it?? Is this really serious?

I think whatever happens, your neighbour is going to get an extremely bloody nose. I can't see any good way out of this and although it may sound very unsympathetic, your neighbour has brought this on himself and he really shouldn't be surprised.

One thing about the money laundering by the way, is that by paying cash in this way he has been unable to recover his money and in fact it is his money which has been laundered.

I don't know if somebody else wants to come along and give some advice but even if you sue, I can imagine that you won't be able to enforce it. As I have said, the best thing you could do is to inform the police that the car has been stolen because the dealer won't let you have it back.


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Also, I notice that although he seems to have 100% feedback score on eBay, the eBay feedback system specifically says that classified ads/sales are excluded from the feedback system.

His last feedback score was over a year ago and that means that you have no idea what kind of feedback he really gets in terms of vehicle sales. From the sounds of your own experience, I would say it's probably pretty bad – but I'm afraid this doesn't show up on eBay.

I bet you your neighbour saw the feedback score and imagined that it was 100% feedback score including vehicle sales. Big Fail!


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he did he seen his feedback and thought every thing was good,

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Hmm did a search for his ebay user name, showed up a post of landyforum seems similar issue - be aware very ripe language used


Please note:

 

  • I am employed in the IT sector of a high street retail chain but am not posting in any official capacity,so therefore any comments,suggestions or opinions are expressly personal ones and should not be viewed as an endorsement or with agreement of any company.
  • i am not legal trained in any form.
  • I have many experiences in life and do often use these in my posts

if ive been helpful kick my scales, if ive been unhelpful kick the scales of the person more helpful :eek:

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I'm very sorry for your neighbour but he seems to have been a bit naïve in several ways - especially to be taken in by the "money laundering" rubbish.  I personally would never buy a car (or anything else) via a bank transfer - there is no consumer protection whatsoever.

 

Also I would expect an 18 year old Mitsubishi Animal to have had a very hard working life - although the mileage seems relatively low for 18 years at 116k miles(?).

 

He could try the police (although I'm not sure there is a criminal offence here).  Try CAB.  Try the bank to see if they can tell him where the money went (probably not because of data protection?).  Try Action Fraud, but despite their name they don't actually take any "action" against Fraud except recording it.  Try suing the dealer but quite likely not be able to recover any judgment.

 

(Your neighbour wrote a letter of rejection.  Did he return the car or did the dealer collect?  Did your neighbour continue to use the car after rejection?  I'm pretty sure Bankfodder knows more about rejection than I do).

 

I don't see much hope of getting any more back than the £500.

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he wrote letter of rejection than dealer took the car for repair?

my neighbour just got to look at it for a few days he never got to drove it,

 

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Posted (edited)

OK.  Try all the suggestions above and wish him good luck.

 

EDIT:  The reason I asked about rejection is that, I believe, once the car is rejected it can't be used and has to be returned.  Sounds like that's been done - others will correct me if I'm wrong.  Looks like small claims court.

Edited by Manxman in exile
Addition

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Surprise suprise, an 18 year old car with an oil leak, its 15 years past the manufacturers warranty period with 18 years of degrading wear n tear..... The poor vehicle is an OAP, would you expect an OAP to have the body and fitness of a 16 year old ?...... Mmmmm no you wouldn't, OAP's leak fluids from every orifice but still function as expected :)  The old truck is probably due a letter from the queen ! 

 

This post is rediculous.

 

 

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Just to kick someone when they are down as well, if the neighbour had bothered to read the terms ebay use they would have realised that this isnt actually  an ebay deal so no protection from them.

I admire you for trying to help but sometimes people really dont help themselves. I hope that he gets something out of this but doubt if they will. The characters selling this way know all the twists and turns and even suing will ny get a CCJ and no money. They have doen it all before and dont care

 

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On 02/06/2019 at 18:08, stinky-pants said:

Surprise suprise, an 18 year old car with an oil leak, its 15 years past the manufacturers warranty period with 18 years of degrading wear n tear..... The poor vehicle is an OAP, would you expect an OAP to have the body and fitness of a 16 year old ?...... Mmmmm no you wouldn't, OAP's leak fluids from every orifice but still function as expected :)  The old truck is probably due a letter from the queen ! 

 

This post is rediculous.

 

 

 

The car is advertised as having relatively low warranted milage and is supposedly sold with no faults and 12 months mechanical warranty, so yes, it would be reasonable to expect it not to have major faults, because that's what the advert says, and the buyer is paying a considerable premium for this. If you bought this car privately or at auction then yea, you'd expect to take your chances, but you'd also expect to pay a lot less, this one is being sold at a considerable premium, on the back of giving the impression that the seller is a reputable dealer with a good reputation. to say the buyer should just suck it up is ridiculous.

 

OP, i would suggest talking to trading standards about this. i would think the best outcome your neighbour could expect here is to get his car back and put the rest down to experience, effectively the dealer has stolen it from him, but i suspect the police would not see it that way. and you'd be left with pursuing a civil case. which if you won, you'd then have the problem of enforcing.

 

with any civil case, the chance of recovery depends on what the person you're suing has to lose, if the seller has a proper business with a proper premises that it still in operation, then if one won one could send bailiffs round to enforce the judgement, if he's a fly by night operator posing as a proper dealer with nothing concrete to lose, then getting anything back might be more difficult.

 

that said, he has the car, that is the property of your neighbour regardless of the £500 refund, if the dealer thinks he's owed that, he has to take the neighbour to court to get it back, he can't just take the car and keep it. i'd be looking to get the car back and let him argue the toss over the £500

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19 hours ago, Tom Lee Pettimore said:

 

The car is advertised as having relatively low warranted milage and is supposedly sold with no faults and 12 months mechanical warranty, so yes, it would be reasonable to expect it not to have major faults, because that's what the advert says, and the buyer is paying a considerable premium for this. If you bought this car privately or at auction then yea, you'd expect to take your chances, but you'd also expect to pay a lot less, this one is being sold at a considerable premium, on the back of giving the impression that the seller is a reputable dealer with a good reputation. to say the buyer should just suck it up is ridiculous.

 

OP, i would suggest talking to trading standards about this. i would think the best outcome your neighbour could expect here is to get his car back and put the rest down to experience, effectively the dealer has stolen it from him, but i suspect the police would not see it that way. and you'd be left with pursuing a civil case. which if you won, you'd then have the problem of enforcing.

 

with any civil case, the chance of recovery depends on what the person you're suing has to lose, if the seller has a proper business with a proper premises that it still in operation, then if one won one could send bailiffs round to enforce the judgement, if he's a fly by night operator posing as a proper dealer with nothing concrete to lose, then getting anything back might be more difficult.

 

that said, he has the car, that is the property of your neighbour regardless of the £500 refund, if the dealer thinks he's owed that, he has to take the neighbour to court to get it back, he can't just take the car and keep it. i'd be looking to get the car back and let him argue the toss over the £500

 

Why don't you actually READ the sellers advert before talking tosh. The seller's advert offers an optional  12 months breakdown warranty cover,  warranties generally do not cover anything related to wear and tear and especially everything on an old banger will be excluded.  OP should have studied the terms of any such warranty before purchasing it, if he did purchase it.  

 

Also, the sellers advert at NO point states the car has NO faults. READ the sellers advert before jumping to huge conclusions. 

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1 hour ago, stinky-pants said:

 

Why don't you actually READ the sellers advert before talking tosh. The seller's advert offers an optional  12 months breakdown warranty cover,  warranties generally do not cover anything related to wear and tear and especially everything on an old banger will be excluded.  OP should have studied the terms of any such warranty before purchasing it, if he did purchase it.  

 

Also, the sellers advert at NO point states the car has NO faults. READ the sellers advert before jumping to huge conclusions. 

 

The buyer should indeed have studied the terms, there are a number of red flags in this advert and from this seller, most have already been mentioned, however, i was not suggesting that the buyer hadn't been foolish or naive in making the purchase, my point was that the seller is at least posing as a reputable dealer, clearly he isn't one, but nevertheless If one was buying a vehicle from a reputable dealer at full forecourt price, one might reasonable expect it to be fit for sale. the age of the vehicle is immaterial, it's entirely possible for a vehicle of this age and mileage to be reliable and mechanically sound, a relatively modern vehicle that's covered 116K is by no means worn out. reasonable wear and tear would be acceptable, major mechanical faults would not be, and would be reasonable grounds to reject the vehicle.

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⁸Even if this vehicle was being sold by a Rolls Royce garage, it's still an old banger valued at scrap money in the open market.

Expecting a faultless vehicle would be very optimistic.

Certainly the vehicle must be roadworthy, so no brakes would be a problem,  but worn brakes would not, as long as the car stops within accepted standard.

Same for clutch, small leaks (which are absolutely normal on an old engine), air con not at sub zero temperature, some rip in the seats, some dents in the body, etc.

The fact is that the neighbour has gambled on a car and the gamble unfortunately did not pay off.

I and many others have gambled with old bangers in our days, sometimes you win, sometimes you lose.

I won a couple of times and lost once, that's the nature of gambling. 

If you want a faultless vehicle buy a new one or a used one from a real dealer with a real reputation and real warranty in case things go wrong. 

Old banger=gambling.

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I would respectfully disagree.

 

Whilst the buyer paid well over the odds for this car, it's clearly worth more than it's scrap value, the bottom of the market will be underwritten by whatever the export price is for the l200 ATM, now that's not a market i follow, but i'd be astonished if it wasn't well above the scrap value.

 

I'd agree that buying any older vehicle is a gamble, and i'd also agree that the buyer has been somewhat naive, even foolhardy in buying a vehicle unseen from  this type of trader.

 

you say to get a 'faultless' vehicle buy from a 'proper' dealer, which is a fair point, but in this case the buyer thought they were buying from a proper dealer with a good reputation. Now it may be obvious to those with more experience that this was clearly not the case, nevertheless, the buyer did set out to give this impression, his success in giving this impression may have depended on the gullibility of potential buyers, but that doesn't absolve the seller of responsibility.

 

It's victim blaming to suggest it's the fault of the buyer to fail to notice the seller was dodgy, clearly the fault lies with the buyer for being dodgy, however obvious this is.

 

This was presented as a retail sale, at full forecourt price, the very least you'd expect is  for the car to have no major faults on delivery, and i'd class a bad oil leak as a major fault. you'd also expect the seller to respect your basic consumer rights, you certainly wouldn't expect the seller to take the car back on pretext of repairing it, then have them keep both the car and nearly £3K of your money.

 

 

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Posted (edited)
7 hours ago, Tom Lee Pettimore said:

I would respectfully disagree.

 

Whilst the buyer paid well over the odds for this car, it's clearly worth more than it's scrap value, the bottom of the market will be underwritten by whatever the export price is for the l200 ATM, now that's not a market i follow, but i'd be astonished if it wasn't well above the scrap value.

 

I'd agree that buying any older vehicle is a gamble, and i'd also agree that the buyer has been somewhat naive, even foolhardy in buying a vehicle unseen from  this type of trader.

 

you say to get a 'faultless' vehicle buy from a 'proper' dealer, which is a fair point, but in this case the buyer thought they were buying from a proper dealer with a good reputation. Now it may be obvious to those with more experience that this was clearly not the case, nevertheless, the buyer did set out to give this impression, his success in giving this impression may have depended on the gullibility of potential buyers, but that doesn't absolve the seller of responsibility.

 

It's victim blaming to suggest it's the fault of the buyer to fail to notice the seller was dodgy, clearly the fault lies with the buyer for being dodgy, however obvious this is.

 

This was presented as a retail sale, at full forecourt price, the very least you'd expect is  for the car to have no major faults on delivery, and i'd class a bad oil leak as a major fault. you'd also expect the seller to respect your basic consumer rights, you certainly wouldn't expect the seller to take the car back on pretext of repairing it, then have them keep both the car and nearly £3K of your money.

 

 

It's 18 years old for crying out loud,  it's lucky it's still on the road and hasn't already been scrapped. When you buy a banger,  you are buying a banger, a going concern, don't have completely unrealistic expectations. Expecting new for old, gold for the price of silver, being clueless and completely naive is the fault of the buyer.....

 

Buyers of end of life cars like these need to have realistic expectations. 

Edited by stinky-pants

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And I would like to add that no reputable car trader sells on Ebay. 

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Not acceptable, but to be expected.

He is the typical car trader throwing some bait out there and hoping for a fat fish to get hooked.

If they sell 1 vehicle a month they're better off than hard working working class people.

It's all risk free.

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5 minutes ago, king12345 said:

And I would like to add that no reputable car trader sells on Ebay. 

 

King. There are plenty of very reputable dealers on ebay who also advertise with Autotrader and all the other premium advertising mediums. 

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Reputable dealers and Ebay are 2 things that will not get together ever.

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