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Hi,

 

I have an ebay and paypal account which are both blocked and can no longer be unblocked. I have requested for both accounts to be deactivated and my details removed as i can still login to both accounts. Both ebay and paypal have stated they cannot remove my details or deactivate the accounts, but the accounts are blocked and i cannot use them.

 

I was just looking to see if anyone has any advice for me in regards to whether the above is correct from ebay and paypal?

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Wouldn't sweat about it

They can't do anything to you

And they are both registered in luxy so not sure if for even applies to them?

please don't hit Quote...just type we know what we said earlier..

 

DCA's view debtors as suckers, marks and mugs

 

NO DCA has ANY legal powers whatsoever on ANY debt no matter what it's Type

and they

are NOT and can NEVER  be BAILIFFS. even if a debt has been to court..

 

If everyone stopped blindly paying DCA's Tomorrow, their industry would collapse overnight... 

 

 

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And they are both registered in luxy so not sure if for even applies to them?

 

Luxembourg is in the EU - one of the oldest member states - so GDPR applies there same as in UK.

 

Did they explain why they couldn't remove your data?

 

I believe they are supposed to publish their data retention policies. Ask them where they are.

 

 

The emphasis under the GDPR is data minimisation, both in terms of the volume of data stored on individuals and how long it’s retained.

 

To summarise the legal requirements, Article 5 (e) of the GDPR states personal data shall be kept for no longer than is necessary for the purposes for which it is being processed. There are some circumstances where personal data may be stored for longer periods (e.g. archiving purposes in the public interest, scientific or historical research purposes).

 

Recital 39 of the GDPR states that the period for which the personal data is stored should be limited to a strict minimum and that time limits should be established by the data controller for deletion of the records (referred to as erasure in the GDPR) or for a periodic review.

 

Organisations must therefore ensure personal data is securely disposed of when no longer needed. This will reduce the risk that it will become inaccurate, out of date or irrelevant.

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