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    • Ho @honeybee13,     Re the account number...Phew! Thank you for that...I'm normally pretty careful in redacting stuff but, did post this very late last night and then started working on...redacting some documents 🙄......in the early hours of the morning when I couldn't sleep, which was in preparation for bringing you up to speed with everything.   Re your question: that's what spurred me on to finally join the site: npower have been in so many breaches over the years, it's mind numbing. One of their latest series of breaches even involves the Ombudsman sanctioning those breaches 👿 Here's what he said about this:-   "The other aspect is in relation to the deadlock letter. You are unhappy that this was sent to your nephew, Mr Sxxxx, but addressed to you. I did seek clarification from npower regarding this and they confirmed what I suspected. Because Mr Sxxxx has been assisting you with your complaint and is a named representative on your npower account, as he is on your account with us, npower state that he had requested information from them, including a deadlock letter. npower therefore sent the deadlock letter to Mr Sxxxx but because the deadlock letter is about your account, the deadlock letter was addressed to you. This is a reasonable explanation from npower, and I do not class this as a breach of GDPR because npower has not shared your personal data with anyone they were not meant to."    
    • Thanks, I have only raised it the once and just took the chance to ask if he'd spoken to the chap and once done, fully intended to thanks both. No, I don't want all the hassle, saying I'd pull my big girl pants up and listen to advice given on here. It was he who began to shout at me so I tried to stand my ground. I know these things can get out of hand. What happens if I need work on the panel in future and for workmen to be at that height interrupts their signal? This isn't a hypothetical question as I've had to have remedial work done in 2015, two years after install with scaffolding up to the roof line?  I really dont want grief again at a later date. Thanks for the reply. It's appreciated.
    • That's certainly an avenue worth exploring. It's a shame when somebody's driving record suffers because of what is essentially an "administrative" offence. Unfortunately there's no difference in the penalty between what happened here and somebody tanking it at 120 on the M1 simply declining to name the driver in order to avoid the (almost inevitable) ban for that offence.   As well as that he may be asked whether he has any unspent convictions in (say) the past five years and whatever the position with his licence he must answer "yes" to that. Whilst penalty points become spent when they cease to have an effect (i.e. after three years) the accompanying endorsement is not spent until five years have elapsed. The problem I think the OP may face is that it is often the employer's insurers who set the conditions and they may not be easily swayed.
    • Would it be an option to appeal to the company looking to employ you, explaining the situation (why you have points on your licence) and highlighting that the index offence wasn’t committed by you, and now you are more aware of the need for company policies tracking drivers, to protect the other company staff?
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puma85

Landlord selling up, unwilling to negotiate an earlier end to tenancy

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We've been in the property 12 months, and 10 months in the landlord has served us with a section 21. So we have two months to leave.

 

An estate agent has been in touch regarding viewings and we have been as accommodating as we can.

 

We have found another place to rent and have asked if the landlord is willing to end the tenancy early, and the answer was no. We can leave early but still need to pay until the end of the 12 months.

 

The new landlord doesn't want to wait that long and if we cant move in earlier he will have to let it to someone else.

 

So, in an attempt to persuade the current landlord I have pointed out that we have been very flexible with the viewings, but have no reason to do this. If he isn't willing to negotiate the leave date, we have no reason to be as flexible as we are, even to the point of not allowing viewings at all.

 

Am I within my rights here?

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In short no.

Your LL doesn't have to agree to an earlier date. You can of course just pay the rent and move earlier, but not many people can afford that.

You need to refer to the clause in your lease on allowable access and notice for your LL.

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OK thanks. Yes I realise I can pay the rent and move early, but that just doesn't make much sense.

 

I was thinking the 'quiet enjoyment' clause would cover us here but youre right the tenancy agreement does say that within the last two months the landlord can access the property with tenants or purchasers but must give reasonable notice.

 

Which leads me onto another question; when we fist let the property we had a verbal agreement that the landlord would not enter the property without us being present because of our dog.

 

If the landlord decides to let his self in for viewing and the dog attacks someone, is that our fault?

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Verbal agreements mean very little when a paper contract is in place. They can be denied knowledge of and it falls back to the paper one.

However the landlord cannot just let themselves in. You need to be there.

A big sign on the door warning of a dog may be prudent, but my argument is its the dogs home and if your unsupervised and the dog feels threatened that's your fault, not the dogs

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So if we're out 9-5 the landlord cannot let themselves in during those hours?

 

So youre saying if the landlord lets them self in, its their fault if already aware of the dog.

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LL has right to inspect Property, without consent of, T proviided he gave min 24 hr Notice of intended Inspection / failed to respond to Ts offer,of mutuallly convenient appt wiitin,7?./days,

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Just inform the LL and estate agent in writing that you have a dog.

If they then decide to take a risk and enter the property while you're not there you could not be blamed.

However, as we live in a "other's fault" society, I wouldn't be surprised if you were blamed if the dog attack them despite your warning.

Written communication and sign on the door would seem reasonable to a reasonable person.

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Alternatively you can change the locks until you leave and then change them back..

 

 

That way no one can enter whilst you are not there, and if they ask why you have changed them, you know that they have tried to enter without permission.


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Why not??

 

 

 

it is not against any law, in fact it is what all tenants should do as soon as they move into a new property..


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https://www.landlordlawblog.co.uk/2016/10/18/tenant-penalties-breaching-tenancy-rules-changing-locks/

 

It is the tenant’s right not to be disturbed or harassed while living in the property. Landlords are not entitled to enter the tenant’s living area without written permission as they have the right to use the property as their home. However, as mentioned, the landlord has the right to ‘reasonable’ access to carry out repairs for which s/he is responsible, but s/he should always ask for the tenant’s permission, and should give at least 24 hours’ notice (s11(6) Landlord and Tenant Act 1985).


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Agreed, but the op wants to stop the LL showing potential TT round whilst he is out... and is well within his rights to dissallow the LL to do so, and if the LL will not stop doing so, then TT is within rights to stop this.

 

 

also this method is better than TT's dog being destroyed for attacking the LL and viewers.


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Alternatively you can change the locks until you leave and then change them back..

 

 

That way no one can enter whilst you are not there, and if they ask why you have changed them, you know that they have tried to enter without permission.

 

 

I agree, changing the locks would be the best way forward, then changing them back when OP final leaves.

 

Just to point out.

 

Section 11 of 1985 Landlord and Tenant Act refers to landlords Repairing obligations in short leases and not showing new tenants around.


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Dog remains resp of T (guest) at all times,) if approved by LL. Dog cannot be a T.

Irrespective of TA Conditions, the LL can apply for an Access Order. If T does not comply they

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