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    • I forgot to add I originally messaged them via there website which I still have access to . Was this Ok ? 
    • If I copied anybody into your complaint it would be your local Care Commissioning Group, not the GMC...
    • So ignore emails from ADCB now ?  I told them they will have to contact me by email and it will have to go to UK courts
    • Hello   Not a legal issue as such but wasn't sure where to ask advice on this.   I have just been awarded £2050 on a PPI claim.  I went through a claims company so i expected to pay them 40% plus VAT of the claim won.  However, i am querying the quoted court costs (which i was not informed about prior to this).  They are quoting the following court costs: -   £205 - Court Issue Fee £335 - Court Hearing Fee   I am no legal expert but these seem very high for such a small financial claim.  I will be lucky to see £500 of the initial £2050 if this is correct (yes i understand the 40% i could have avoided if i didnt use the claims company).  If these costs seem realistic then no probs with agreeing to them but if the claims company artificially inflated these for their own gain i would be none the wiser.     Can anyone advise please?   Thanks 
    • Our general hospital uses a similar system, but I don't think(?) it displays all your personal details for confirmation at the end of the process.  In fact I'm pretty sure that at the end of the process it displays only the last three or four digits of your 'phone number and you must confirm that this is correct.    Also at my GP's surgery it only asks for date and month of birth together with the initial letter of your surname and then it displays "Thank you.  You are recorded as attending".   I would say what you describe is a sort of breach of data protection, but not sure how serious it might be.  (I can see no valid reason for displaying full name and address etc if other hospitals' systems don't).   Go to the website of the NHS Trust in question and see what their complaints process is.  There may be two different processes: one for "general complaints" and a separate one for data protection complaints (eg direct to the trust's data controller*).   Personally, I would complain down both routes.  Don't, whatever you do, get diverted down the PALS (Patient Advice and Liaison Service) path as they won't be equipped to deal with this sort of issue.   As a former NHS manager I'd be interested to know what sort of reply you get.   FWIW I'm surprised(!) the ICO suggested complaining to the GMC as they won't be interested.  This isn't a medical staff issue - it's a trust data management issue.  (I'm really surprised at the ICO's suggestion on this - it's bonkers!).   *If you can't find out how to contact the Trust's data controller from their website, ring and ask them.   EDIT:  I wouldn't allow people to "shoulder surf" me.  Our trust makes it clear that people behind you have to stand behind a line so they can't see over your shoulder.  If anybody was standing directly behind me I would "politely" draw their attention to the notices and "ask" them to stand back.  If your hospital does not make this clear, that's another complaint...)
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Ex is holding on to possessions

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After a bit of advice. A friend of mine has recently split from her husband. She's moved out but he's being a [removed] and not allowing her back into the flat to get her possessions including clothes and jewellery.

 

Does she have any recourse in law such as obtaining a court order to allow her to recover her possessions?

Edited by dx100uk
behave - dx

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After a bit of advice. A friend of mine has recently split from her husband. She's moved out but he's being a [removed] and not allowing her back into the flat to get her possessions including clothes and jewellery.

 

Does she have any recourse in law such as obtaining a court order to allow her to recover her possessions?

 

I would think the Police would attend if asked to ensure your friend can collect her possessions and no law is broken. I suppose the act of the ex husband could be considered a continuation of abusive behaviour towards your friend. It is not really what the Police are there for, but if a court was asked to apply an order saying that the ex husband had to allow her access to her possessions, then the Police might be called anyway, if there was possibility of violence or public order issue.

 

Suggest your friend speaks to local Police on 101 to see if they can assist.


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There are other factors, too, if the flat is owned by them, or is on a lease of over 7 years.

If so, whose name is the title to the house in? (The ‘legal title’ held at the land registry).

 

If hers, (or both of theirs) she has a right of access. As others have said, the police won’t get involved in the nitty-gritty, but will come to ensure no breach of the peace (as they will if the property is on a lease of 7 years or less)

 

If he holds the legal title (& she is not listed), if he is being that difficult already, he may get more unreasonable. She needs to see a solicitor and protect her rights by getting a restriction placed at the Land Registry / notice placed at the Land Charges Registry under the Matrimonial Rights parts of the Family Law Act 1996.

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Many thanks for the responses. Tallies with the advice I'd already given her which was to ask the police to attend and consult a lawyer.


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