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king12345

Expired MOT on stored car

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Hi caggers, i can't find a definitive answer online, so i ask you.

I have an old car that I'm fixing in my spare time.

It's insured and taxed, but the mot expired a few days ago.

It will take me another month or so until i finish fixing it and it is stored in a private garage.

Can i get a fine for an expired mot even though the car is not on the road?

Thanks

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No.

 

Provded that the vehicle remains on private property, other than travelling directly to or from a pre-booked MOT test, or to a place of repair for any failure items, no offence is committed. You will, however, not be able to re-tax the vehicle if the current tax runs out before being tested (not that this would be a problem provided that you then SORNed it)

 

If you are concerned having seen that DVLA send penalty notices under the continuous insurance regulation, even for vehicles off the road, this has no bearing on MOT.


My time as a Police Officer and subsequently time working within the Motor Trade gives me certain insights into the problems that consumers may encounter.

I have no legal qualifications.

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Thanks.

Tax was renewed last month while mot was still current as well as insurance.

I should be alright then.

Will pre-book mot when i finish fixing the car and drive straight there.

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I think regs might change as regards this later this month ???

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What do you mean?

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I think regs might change as regards this later this month ???

 

 

care to enlighten us????????


:mad2::-x:jaw::sad:

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Apparently, and haven't checked exactly what they say but I think around the 23rd May new regs come in which redefine faults found.

I'm told MOT reports in relation to tests classify faults as minor, medium and serious with a serious meaning it can only be trailered away and can't be used on a public highway whatsoever even if travelling to get it repaired.

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I'm missing the bit that says it can't be driven to mot.

It only says that following a dangerous mot failure it can't be driven on highway.

How to find out for sure?

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Will pre-book mot when i finish fixing the car and drive straight there.

 

It can be any MOT place, not necessarily the nearest. As long as it is pre-booked and you are reasonably en-route.

 

However you must go there directly. Breaking the journey and stopping off on the way there is not permitted.

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king12345, as far as driving to the MOT station is concerned, it remains (will remain) as has always been. The concession is simply the being driven on the road without a valid mot being in force. It has always been that the vehicle must be roadworthy under the Contruction and Use Regs, with or without mot. The new classification is simply a re-defining of faults to clarify how they should be dealt with.

 

Years ago a red failore certificate was issued with a section banning the vehicle from being driven away. The MOT station could not physically stop the owner from doing so, but a subsequent prosecution for an unroadworthy vehicle would attract a higher penalty as the owner could not claim ignorance of the faults.

 

Obviously you will be preparing the vehicle to PASS the test, not use the tester to do your job of finding out what work it needs to pass, won't you?


My time as a Police Officer and subsequently time working within the Motor Trade gives me certain insights into the problems that consumers may encounter.

I have no legal qualifications.

If you have found my post helpful, please enhance my reputation by clicking on the Heart. Thank you

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Don't you worry, the car will be back to factory standard before I take it to mot.

I even splashed out on a pa job for front and back bumpers 👍

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