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Jessops - Faulty 5.5 yr old camera DSLR

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Hi all,

 

I purhased a Canon DSLR in April 2012 ago on credit card (which I no longer hold) from Jessops.

 

It has just developed a fault whereby the mode dial does not select the correct shooting mode.

Am I covered under the sale of goods act/consumer rights act as it now is?

 

To complicate things, I think Jessops went into administration in 2015, then started trading again?

 

More importantly, I am currently travelling in Central America and Australia for the next 18 months, so need to get this fixed locally (currently Panama City).

I have checked my travel insurance policy and it does not cover electrical or mechanical breakdown, so I don't think I am covered by that.

 

Any advice on how to procede would be much appreciated.

 

Kind regards.

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Buy another camera?

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How long do you think the ‘average’ DSLR of that price should last?

Bearing in mind that is an average, Some will last longer, others less ... so what is the earliest you feel it is acceptable one should fail?

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How long do you think the ‘average’ DSLR of that price should last?

Bearing in mind that is an average, Some will last longer, others less ... so what is the earliest you feel it is acceptable one should fail?

 

Exactly, neither Jessops or Cannon will have any responsibility for a camera that old. I should imagine in terms of any reasonable expectation of product lifespan, that this would have to be argued in a court. But this is not going to happen.

 

The consumer would need to obtain an inspection report from a camera technician, confirming what the fault was, whether it could be fixed and if so how much. Remember that even if it was a manufacturers fault and the camera was not repairable, that any court claim would be for any loss of reasonable lifespan. So if a camera should last 6 years and cost say £600 originally. If the camera failed when it was 5.5 years old, the claim amount would only be £50. Given cost of technician report and court claim, with little chance of success, the consumer would not bother.

 

If the camera could be fixed, then no chance of claiming back repair cost.

 

So in this situation. It is a repair at your own expense or you buy a replacement camera.


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quite often see these faults in say the 450d etc

its simply old age and dirt

 

there are guides on the net upon how to get to it

all it need is usually a spray of contact cleaner like servisol 10 or alike [NOT WD40!]

 

for that age there wont be any cover under SOGA/CRA.

 

most camera shops that do basic repairs should be able to fix it for about £30-50

or with a jewellers screwdriver set you can do it yourself


please don't hit Quote...just type we know what we said earlier..

 

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you have 2 problems, that consumer law wont help you and the store you bought it from doesnt exist. what do you think is the best thing to do? Pay for someone to have a look at it/buy a new one or start a fight in a phone box over nothing.

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Am I too late to chip in?

 

 

Several years ago I bought a laptop with my credit card for £900.

After about 30 months it melted whilst using it. I mean proper melted at the back. Smoke and stuff.

Comet weren't interested as it was out of the 24 month warranty.

I rang, at that time, Consumer Advice? Not Citizens.

The lad explained any item must last 6 years, unless it's wear and tear etc.

He explained it with -

I live on my own. I watch the TV for about 2 hours a night. If it packed up after 5 1/2 years I could claim back from the card company, because no way had it been caused by wear and tear.

Living on my own, I sit on my settee to watch TV. If after 5 1/2 years it started showing signs of wear I could claim from the card company. If I was married with 3 kids and a dog bouncing about on it, that would be a different matter.

Following his advice on several occasions, I wrote to the card company.

They arranged for me to take it to a local computer shop to have it checked, paid for by them.

The card company took the full 11 weeks they were allowed to sort it, but in the end they gave me a cheque for £700 to buy a new laptop. They reasoned, correctly, that in the 2 1/2 years I'd had it, laptops had come down in price and also advanced in performance.

They sent me a cheque and said it was up to me what I spent it on.

 

 

Just saying.

 

 

Paul

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Am I too late to chip in?

 

 

Several years ago I bought a laptop with my credit card for £900.

After about 30 months it melted whilst using it. I mean proper melted at the back. Smoke and stuff.

Comet weren't interested as it was out of the 24 month warranty.

I rang, at that time, Consumer Advice? Not Citizens.

The lad explained any item must last 6 years, unless it's wear and tear etc.

He explained it with -

I live on my own. I watch the TV for about 2 hours a night. If it packed up after 5 1/2 years I could claim back from the card company, because no way had it been caused by wear and tear.

Living on my own, I sit on my settee to watch TV. If after 5 1/2 years it started showing signs of wear I could claim from the card company. If I was married with 3 kids and a dog bouncing about on it, that would be a different matter.

Following his advice on several occasions, I wrote to the card company.

They arranged for me to take it to a local computer shop to have it checked, paid for by them.

The card company took the full 11 weeks they were allowed to sort it, but in the end they gave me a cheque for £700 to buy a new laptop. They reasoned, correctly, that in the 2 1/2 years I'd had it, laptops had come down in price and also advanced in performance.

They sent me a cheque and said it was up to me what I spent it on.

 

 

Just saying.

 

 

Paul

 

What, EXACTLY, are you 'just saying'?

 

That the OP might be able to claim that the item should have lasted 6 years instead of 5 1/2?.

 

The OP might indeed be able to do so. That'd get them a refund of 1/12 of the purchase price .

How do you expect them to be able to get that refund?

 

To do so they'd likely need to get an expert's report, and their original post notes they are off traveling.

 

UB covered this well in their contribution:

Exactly, neither Jessops or Cannon will have any responsibility for a camera that old. I should imagine in terms of any reasonable expectation of product lifespan, that this would have to be argued in a court. But this is not going to happen.

 

The consumer would need to obtain an inspection report from a camera technician, confirming what the fault was, whether it could be fixed and if so how much. Remember that even if it was a manufacturers fault and the camera was not repairable, that any court claim would be for any loss of reasonable lifespan. So if a camera should last 6 years and cost say £600 originally. If the camera failed when it was 5.5 years old, the claim amount would only be £50. Given cost of technician report and court claim, with little chance of success, the consumer would not bother.

 

If the camera could be fixed, then no chance of claiming back repair cost.

 

So in this situation. It is a repair at your own expense or you buy a replacement camera.

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