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On work related ESA and have anxiety etc but adviser says I'm OK

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I have been on work related ESA for about a year or so, my adviser has been pusihing me to volunteer at a charity shop and I have. But it isn't my anxiety that's effecting me.

 

I have trapped wind(very painful and makes me sick) so had a blood test and was diagnosed with a failing thyriod, no medication given yet.

When I first went onto ESA before the interview to determine where I go, I wrote down trapped wind.

But was not allowed to put that down on my sick note.

 

With my thyriod problem it has casued me to suffer from on/off depression, I have anxiety which makes me sick. I am due for another blood test for diabetes as my blood sugar was high last week.

I didn't know that my thyriod was the reason why I am always tired and sometimes depressed.

 

Can I add these to my ESA claim? My adviser thinks anxiety is curable and I should get over it. Not in that way, but she thinks I'm ready to work.

 

I have never worked and I never pass an interview.

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See your Doctor. If they agree that other conditions are relevant, then they can issue a note of these and you can update your ESA claim. It is then up to DWP to organise another assessment if they believe this is necessary.


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Your adviser sounds very ignorant to me and has no right saying such a thing to you, you can't just be cured of anxiety and depression over night.

 

Yes you can add that to your claim as it's affecting your health, your adviser is in no position to decide you're ready to return to work.

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An underactive Thyroid is easily treatable with the correct medication, its a life time condition but not a lifetime illness, I was diagnosed in 2003 and am on one of the highest dosages and still able to work, your GP needs to put you on a thyroxine regime and you could ask to be referred to an endocrinologist. Once on thyroxine it will take time to get the dosage right and it may take time to get better, but I would be very surprised if any GP would say you are unfit for work with an easily treatable condition.

 

 

This link explains more

 

 

http://www.nhs.uk/conditions/Thyroid-under-active/Pages/Introduction.aspx

 

 

I cant help with the anxiety question but if your depression is a symptom of your Thyriod condition (mine was) it should be alleviated once your medication stabilises it

 

 

As for Diabetes is it type 1 or type 2, certainly type 2 is no barrier to work but if you are diagnosed with type 1 then that should be entered on your ESA claim.

 

 

You need to go back to your GP to start the thyroxine regime and to find out what type diabetes you have

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An underactive Thyroid is easily treatable with the correct medication,

 

There are many, many people who would disagree with this - for most people it is easily treatable, for a few it is a lifelong nightmare.


RMW

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I take Fluoxetine for my Anxiety which was started by Autism and 22Q11 DS

 

Be careful what you say to the doctor.

But be honest.

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There are many, many people who would disagree with this - for most people it is easily treatable, for a few it is a lifelong nightmare.

 

 

if you want to call chronic tiredness, loss of hair, the inability to control body temperature, the shakes, weight gain, constipation, brain fog, hair loss, slow heartbeat, depression, muscle weakness a lifelong nightmare then I have been living this nightmare since 2003, only mine is controlled by medication and I am able to work, I have 3 family members who have an underactive thyroid and I am a member of several support groups, very very few people have to give up work, some do go on ESA until their condition is brought under control, but as the OPs GP hasn't put them on a thyroid regime its hard to tell if their condition is serious enough for them to be unable to work, that's why I suggested they ask to be referred to a specialist

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I saw my adviser last Wednesday, I emailed her as soon as I got my diagnosis and she said in the interview. 'I can give you a break as I know you are getting no where here'.

I had to quit my charity volunteer position because of my stomach problems.

Thyriod problems does run in the family, as my maternal cousin had her's removed.

I will book an appointment this week for medication as I am ever so tired nowadays and need something for my anxiety too.

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An underactive Thyroid is easily treatable with the correct medication, its a life time condition but not a lifetime illness, I was diagnosed in 2003 and am on one of the highest dosages and still able to work, your GP needs to put you on a thyroxine regime and you could ask to be referred to an endocrinologist. Once on thyroxine it will take time to get the dosage right and it may take time to get better, but I would be very surprised if any GP would say you are unfit for work with an easily treatable condition.

 

 

This link explains more

 

 

http://www.nhs.uk/conditions/Thyroid-under-active/Pages/Introduction.aspx

 

 

I cant help with the anxiety question but if your depression is a symptom of your Thyriod condition (mine was) it should be alleviated once your medication stabilises it

 

 

As for Diabetes is it type 1 or type 2, certainly type 2 is no barrier to work but if you are diagnosed with type 1 then that should be entered on your ESA claim.

 

 

You need to go back to your GP to start the thyroxine regime and to find out what type diabetes you have

 

The op did not ask for your medical opinion are you qualified?

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Please consider the following facts assuming you are using an NHS service...

 

You can add anything you like to your claim for ESA as a reason fo rneeding it, it is ofcourse best supported with Your medical teams confirmation.. Your medical team is your NHS doctor and your consultant if you have one. Any body else who wishes to become your medical health professorial can do so by requesting the position from you but it is upto you to accept or decline and DWP or ots agents cannot force you to take there medical advice. The DWP have the right to assess you using there medical health professionals but it is just an exam to determine a finding they cannot force you to accept any treatment if offered in any form ;-) It is the DWP's opinion V your opinion and that of your medical team..... DWP and its agents They will trick you, fool you, tease you and play with your head all you have to say when faced by them is soemthing like this "I have a medical team already and I am happy with them thankyou." And make sure not to sign anything offered by a DWP agent like ingeus because they have merged an attendance form with a consent form for them to become your medical health team, its very naughty indeed... Be strong it can be tough i knwo I write form first hand experience.

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I went saw my doctor as I had to have another blood test for diabetes, which was negative. I asked about my thyriod and he said it wasnt that bad and I don't need medication yet. And I'll need another blood test in 6 months. I also got a priscription for Buscapan hoping this will ease the bloating as for the past 3 days I have been ill with it and it has made me throw up.

The doctor never asks me if I'd like a thorough test, so don't know what causes this.

I haven't yet added any of the thyriod stuff to my sicknot thingy as I don't think I should as it's not troubling me yet. But still not sure about bloating/trapped wind, it sounds stupid adding that.

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Is your adviser medically trained to know that you're actually "ok"?

 

I've had similar - I was on the work programme and informed them (amongst other things) I'd been diagnosed with a hearing problem which can be quite painful. I was told "well, it can't be that bad if you've just been diagnosed". You, as happened with me, can go to bed with completely normal hearing and wake up with this particular problem.

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As for Diabetes is it type 1 or type 2, certainly type 2 is no barrier to work but if you are diagnosed with type 1 then that should be entered on your ESA claim.

 

 

You need to go back to your GP to start the thyroxine regime and to find out what type diabetes you have

 

Plenty of people with type 1 diabetes work, and lead 'normal' lives.

Some people with type 1 diabetes (especially if 'brittle' diabetes) may find it affects their ability to work, or limits the jobs they can do.

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Had similar with my JSA advisor 2 weeks back. In a patronising way telling me to take control of my chronic illnesses. Telling me to do improve my core muscles. Obviously thats a new one on me and ive never tried that like:-x having completed 2 pain clinics there is little i have not tried to get a handle on things but in the end i find moderate exercise helpful such as walks. Only reason im not fighting for ESA is the stress of going through that would probably send my pain through the roof as stress def plays a massive part with me.

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