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Suspected Shoplifter dies after being tackled by Security Guard


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Shoplifting suspect dies after being tackled by store security guard

 

Security guard arrested on suspicion of manslaughter after suspect suffers ‘significant injury’ from smashed bottles

 

A man has died after he was allegedly tackled by a security guard who suspected him of shoplifting, police have said.

 

The security guard, who was working for Sainsbury’s in Trowbridge, Wiltshire, was arrested on suspicion of manslaughter, then bailed.

 

The 30-year-old victim, who has not been named, suffered a “significant injury” when glass bottles he was carrying smashed as he was tackled by the 20-year-old security guard.

 

DCI Jeremy Carter said: “The man arrested is a security guard from a local store. He tackled the suspected shoplifter causing a number of glass bottles he was concealing to smash.

 

“This caused a significant injury to the man, who, despite the best efforts from paramedics, sadly died.”

 

 

Bit young to be a security guard isn't he ?

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18+ to hold a SIA licence sadly. And it takes pretty much no effort to get one. basically pay the fee to a training company and you more or less get it after basic training.

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other reports are saying he died of heart failure

if/if not his injuries contributed to this is a matter of speculation

 

 

however if one didn't steal multiple bottles of booze

one wouldn't get hurt by them if one did get tackled

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Its standard practice to be arrested and bailed if you are involved in a death like this. It secures the police's position should they need to take further action.

 

Any speculation about the wrong age or guilt of the guard is just that, speculation.

Leave the police investigate, unless you want to return to oldy England and hang the guard out of public demand like some sort of witch hunt.

 

You see this all the time. In a fatal car crash, the other party is nearly always arrested and bailed to assist with the investigation. Its just best practice.

 

Also, what is wrong with a 20 year old guard? I was fighting in battle when I was 18! So 18 to defend your freedom is fine, but 20 as a shop security guard is a shock to you??? Funny old world.

 

Sia license for security is a weeks course and a fair few hundred pounds along with a clean disclosure check. And contrary to belief, they don't just let anyone in. I see plenty of thugs turned away due to attitude etc.

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other reports are saying he died of heart failure

if/if not his injuries contributed to this is a matter of speculation

 

 

however if one didn't steal multiple bottles of booze

one wouldn't get hurt by them if one did get tackled

 

 

What ever reason this has happened, maybe it could have been better handled, and if the security guard is charged with manslaughter, I think someone from Sainsbury so also be charged, maybe one of the directors

 

 

My reasons behind this, all employees should be properly trained, and in event of something happening they should know how to deal with this; so for instance this shop lifter, was there a need to tackle the guy, could the security guard just have asked the man to come back in the shop

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What ever reason this has happened, maybe it could have been better handled, and if the security guard is charged with manslaughter, I think someone from Sainsbury so also be charged, maybe one of the directors

 

 

My reasons behind this, all employees should be properly trained, and in event of something happening they should know how to deal with this; so for instance this shop lifter, was there a need to tackle the guy, could the security guard just have asked the man to come back in the shop

Where you a witness to the tackle and can you confirm that procedures were not observed? A tackle could mean placing a hand on someone's shoulder or flying through the air to tackle a person around the lower legs. Maybe the person resisted with the result they fell on the bottles.

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could come under = aggravated Murder?

 

I know of manslaughter (person dies, person responsible for death didn't mean to kill or cause GBH, but was criminally negligent or intended some harm), and murder (person dies, person responsible for death meant to kill or cause GBH), but what is 'aggravated Murder'??

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Aggravated assault is an assault which criminal laws punish more severely due to its seriousness. Factors which raise an assault to an aggravated assault typically include the use of a weapon, the status of the victim, the intent of the perpetrator, and the (degree of injury caused)

 

Note:- New laws being presented to parliament but mainly due to aggravated assault on women/

:mad2::-x:jaw::sad:
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could come under = aggravated Murder?

 

I know of manslaughter (person dies, person responsible for death didn't mean to kill or cause GBH, but was criminally negligent or intended some harm), and murder (person dies, person responsible for death meant to kill or cause GBH), but what is 'aggravated Murder'??

 

Aggravated assault is an assault which criminal laws punish more severely due to its seriousness. Factors which raise an assault to an aggravated assault typically include the use of a weapon, the status of the victim, the intent of the perpetrator, and the (degree of injury caused)

 

Note:- New laws being presented to parliament but mainly due to aggravated assault on women/

 

The courts can already consider exacerbating factors (or mitigation) when sentencing for assault.

 

But, you've moved from discussing the "aggravated Murder" you mentioned to 'aggravated assault'.

So, what is 'aggravated Murder' that you mentioned?.

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aggravated murder = is used in the U.S.A. i.e, The term ‘aggravated’ means that the murder is surrounded by some other circumstances such as the victim being killed while another (crime was being committed,) (being a crime) or the killing being committed along such lines with rape etc.

 

hence in the past even in this country the term has been used in reports especially in the 60s/70s. of course later lawyers used the Mitigating circumstances whilst defending . seeing as you like arguments I withdraw the subject forthwith, does not help any peeps situation the arguing.

:mad2::-x:jaw::sad:
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aggravated murder = is used in the U.S.A. i.e, The term ‘aggravated’ means that the murder is surrounded by some other circumstances such as the victim being killed while another (crime was being committed,) (being a crime) or the killing being committed along such lines with rape etc.

 

hence in the past even in this country the term has been used in reports especially in the 60s/70s. of course later lawyers used the Mitigating circumstances whilst defending . seeing as you like arguments I withdraw the subject forthwith, does not help any peeps situation the arguing.

 

I'm not after an argument. I wanted to know if:

a) I'd missed a relevant new development in UK law, or

b) an irrelevant (and potentially distracting) term from US law was being introduced into discussion of UK events.

Thanks for clarifying it was the latter.

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Its standard practice to be arrested and bailed if you are involved in a death like this. It secures the police's position should they need to take further action.

 

Any speculation about the wrong age or guilt of the guard is just that, speculation.

Leave the police investigate, unless you want to return to oldy England and hang the guard out of public demand like some sort of witch hunt.

 

You see this all the time. In a fatal car crash, the other party is nearly always arrested and bailed to assist with the investigation. Its just best practice.

 

Also, what is wrong with a 20 year old guard? I was fighting in battle when I was 18! So 18 to defend your freedom is fine, but 20 as a shop security guard is a shock to you??? Funny old world.

 

Sia license for security is a weeks course and a fair few hundred pounds along with a clean disclosure check. And contrary to belief, they don't just let anyone in. I see plenty of thugs turned away due to attitude etc.

 

I was surprised there was any need to "tackle" a shoplifter ?

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I always thought this strange.

 

 

When I worked as a student at a supermarket there was an alarm that was sounded in the warehouse if a shoplifter had done a runner.

 

 

All the men dropped what they were doing and ran to the entrance to the store.

 

 

I was never officially told to do this, nor was it in any guidance I was given.

 

 

Once at the entrance they would generally look around the car park for the alleged offender and, if found, bring him inside.

 

 

How they would secure him if they found him was anyone's guess.

 

 

We did have a security guard presence at the store too.

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I was surprised there was any need to "tackle" a shoplifter ?

 

I can't speak to the specifics of this event, and I'm sure more will come out at the inquest, but:

 

Not all shoplifters "come quietly".

What if they are running off? Might that not create a need to 'tackle' them?

 

What if they initially run off but then stop, turn round and threaten the security staff?

Would that not leave the staff member with the choice of backing off, or of tackling them?.

What if the security person felt that they would be attacked even if they backed away?.

 

I suspect all security staff are told by their employers "make a risk assesment, don't put yourself in danger", as part of the employer covering themselves .... but in the end the security staff will see their job as providing security ...........

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I was surprised there was any need to "tackle" a shoplifter ?

 

 

I was always told in my store, if a shoplifter is going to run, let them go, don't put your self in danger, after all we have the proof he hasn't paid for his shopping on cctv, and this them gets passed on to the police

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I can't speak to the specifics of this event, and I'm sure more will come out at the inquest, but:

 

Not all shoplifters "come quietly".

What if they are running off? Might that not create a need to 'tackle' them?

 

What if they initially run off but then stop, turn round and threaten the security staff?

Would that not leave the staff member with the choice of backing off, or of tackling them?.

What if the security person felt that they would be attacked even if they backed away?.

 

I suspect all security staff are told by their employers "make a risk assesment, don't put yourself in danger", as part of the employer covering themselves .... but in the end the security staff will see their job as providing security ...........

 

Technically theyre not security. Theyre loss prevention, but have an after duty of making sure nobody is violent.

Any advice i give is my own and is based solely on personal experience. If in any doubt about a situation , please contact a certified legal representative or debt counsellor..

 

 

If my advice helps you, click the star icon at the bottom of my post and feel free to say thanks

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limits on action will depend on where the person was at the time. If on the property of the store then the employee has more rights to use restraint or force to stop the person from causing harm to anyone else. One of ther reasons doormen have different registration to those working inside a store/pub etc. You will have to read Hansard on the Prevention of Crime Act 1953 to see what parliament made of the words regarding reasonable force and necessary force as they are not the same.

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And of course Section 3 Criminal Law Act 1967 -

 

A person may use such force as is reasonable in the circumstances in the prevention of crime, or in effecting or assisting in the lawful arrest of offenders or suspected offenders or of persons unlawfully at large.

 

http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/1967/58/section/3

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What authority had this security guard got in apprehending this individual? As far as i am aware it was not in the supermarket but in a nearby public car park..

 

All i can think of was a ciitizens arrest under section 24A(1)(b) PACE 1984

Edited by obiter dictum
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What authority had this security guard got in apprehending this individual? As far as i am aware it was not in the supermarket but in a nearby public car park..

 

All i can think of was a ciitizens arrest under section 24A(1)(b) PACE 1984

 

Indeed.

Under PACE any person can detain someone who has committed an offence or about to commit one using reasonable force until they can be arrested by a constable.

Reasonable belief that an offence has been committed (or about to be committed) is a condition of the detainment.

This is the piece of legislation all security guards use to keep offenders on the scene.

With shoplifting, when offenders comply, the matter is usually resolved without police intervention.

In this case, without knowing the whole story, it looks like the suspect offender run away from the store chased by security guard.

After he was apprehended he suffered a heart attack.

If he had an existing condition, the race out of the shop might be a major contributor to the heart attack, more than the tackle from the guard (if there was a tackle, assuming worse case scenario here).

Sadly, the suspect didn't do himself any favour by running away and the guard didn't do anything wrong by chasing after him.

So imo just a tragic event.

Unless we then find out that the guard battered the suspect.

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Indeed.

 

After he was apprehended he suffered a heart attack.

If he had an existing condition, the race out of the shop might be a major contributor to the heart attack, more than the tackle from the guard (if there was a tackle, assuming worse case scenario here).

Sadly, the suspect didn't do himself any favour by running away and the guard didn't do anything wrong by chasing after him.

So imo just a tragic event.

Unless we then find out that the guard battered the suspect.

 

All deaths are "cardiac arrest" in the end, when the heart stops ....... that isn't a "cause of death", it is a "mode of dying".

 

Not all 'cardiac arrest" is "heart attack" : (more technically; 'myocardial infarction''), just as not all heart attacks lead to cardiac arrest.

 

Initial reports suggested that the alleged shoplifter was carrying bottles, which smashed, leading to him suffering blood loss. For a 30-year old, this is way more likely than a previous heart condition (although that is possible, such as HOCM), but much less likely when severe blood loss has already been cited.

 

http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-wiltshire-38932180

 

Det Ch Insp Jeremy Carter said: "He tackled the suspected shoplifter causing a number of glass bottles he was concealing to smash. "He suffered significant bleeding from which he died."

 

The cardiac arrest could have been from significant blood loss, rather than 'heart attack' (the heart itself could have been fine to pump blood, but the blood wasn't there to pump, having bled out).

 

But, although I've based my comments on the currently available information (the report quoting the investigating officer), the inquest will decide, based on witness testimony and the post-mortem.

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All deaths are "cardiac arrest" in the end, when the heart stops ....... that isn't a "cause of death", it is a "mode of dying".

 

Not all 'cardiac arrest" is "heart attack" : (more technically; 'myocardial infarction''), just as not all heart attacks lead to cardiac arrest.

 

Initial reports suggested that the alleged shoplifter was carrying bottles, which smashed, leading to him suffering blood loss. For a 30-year old, this is way more likely than a previous heart condition (although that is possible, such as HOCM), but much less likely when severe blood loss has already been cited.

 

http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-wiltshire-38932180

 

 

 

The cardiac arrest could have been from significant blood loss, rather than 'heart attack' (the heart itself could have been fine to pump blood, but the blood wasn't there to pump, having bled out).

 

But, although I've based my comments on the currently available information (the report quoting the investigating officer), the inquest will decide, based on witness testimony and the post-mortem.

 

Very true, we can only guess without more info.

I wonder if the guard tackled the guy carrying the bottles making him fall on them.

That would be a freak accident (unless the guard knew about the bottles).

I might be harsh, but if he'd just stopped instead of running he would be probably asking about rhp on this forum now.

Sad...

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I wonder if the guard tackled the guy carrying the bottles making him fall on them.

 

Wonder no more.

I cited the BBC news webpage, and quoted (above : and again)

Det Ch Insp Jeremy Carter said: "He tackled the suspected shoplifter causing a number of glass bottles he was concealing to smash. "He suffered significant bleeding from which he died."

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