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How could the NHS save money?

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Should there be more government funding for Council run Nursing Homes and Hospices - I think there should be.


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Rather than the use of Agency Nurses - perhaps there could be a bank of nurses who are mobile for each trust - they could then go to those hospitals who are short of staff.


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Should there be more government funding for Council run Nursing Homes and Hospices

 

The above is more about taking the pressure of elderly patients out of hospital beds and into a more caring environment.

 

 

Perhaps if this were to be, then hospitals might find meeting these targets easier/ more achievable.


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NHS could save money by curing people instead of deliberately keeping them sick for as long as possible and pack them up with medications.

 

Oh, no.

What would happen to the farmaceutical industry then???

Better keep them sweet!

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I believe everyone who earns a wage (say over £20k per annum) should pay an extra £1 per week NI contribution specifically to the NHS - that would soon get the coffers filled - millions of pounds would be collected each week. What can you get for £1 these days ? - I'm sure no-one would miss it and it would ensure there is plenty to go round all areas of the NHS.


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It seems to me to be madness to throw money at the NHS without tackling waste and inefficiency first. If you had a tap at home that was gushing water and could not turn off, would you ring a plumber or just leave it and accept that you will have to pay higher bills?

 

 

I cannot believe it would not be cost-effective to recycle equipment like crutches etc, even taking into account the necessary disinfecting process. One of my relatives had a wheelchair specially ordered for them. They died before it was used, but there was no request for its return. I, however, delivered it back to the office. The same for other items. Patients could be requested to leave a deposit.

 

 

The NHS has enormous clout to get the cheapest prices not just on drugs, but numerous other items, like light bulbs, surgical gloves and so on, because it can buy in bulk. I don't feel that it uses its position well.

 

 

How much money is consumed by doctors using NHS facilities for private work? I know this happens.

 

 

I also know that many managers were given computer equipment that was not recovered when they left the organisation.

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NHS could save money by curing people instead of deliberately keeping them sick for as long as possible and pack them up with medications.

 

Oh, no.

What would happen to the farmaceutical industry then???

Better keep them sweet!

 

I find that insulting to the many hardworking NHS staff.

 

What illness do you believe the NHS can cure that it is deliberately keeping people ill?

 

The rabid conspiracy theorists claim it for some diseases but can never show it is more than deranged rantings. With today's Information Age : if it were true a whistle-blower would come forward, and come forward with proof, not "my dog's groomer's sister's heard it down the pub"!

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I find that insulting to the many hardworking NHS staff.

 

What illness do you believe the NHS can cure that it is deliberately keeping people ill?

 

The rabid conspiracy theorists claim it for some diseases but can never show it is more than deranged rantings. With today's Information Age : if it were true a whistle-blower would come forward, and come forward with proof, not "my dog's groomer's sister's heard it down the pub"!

 

Indeed. They are working on cures / treatment for two of the conditions I have. But it's not that simple. One involves stem cell treatment. The other involves medication. But that medication comes with it's own risks. There is surgery; but not everyone (me) is suitable for it.

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I'd be very interested to know if there really is money wasted on admin staff.

 

Only a small example, but I did hear a first hand story about a consultant who was told that their outpatient clinic would be moved to a different hospital. Fine, the consultant knew, but the admin team kept telling the patients their appointments were in the original hospital.

 

In the end, they had to spend time and money writing to everyone to tell them that their clinic had moved and they needed to go to the new hospital.

 

HB


Illegitimi non carborundum

 

 

 

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It seems to me to be madness to throw money at the NHS without tackling waste and inefficiency first. If you had a tap at home that was gushing water and could not turn off, would you ring a plumber or just leave it and accept that you will have to pay higher bills?

 

 

I cannot believe it would not be cost-effective to recycle equipment like crutches etc, even taking into account the necessary disinfecting process. One of my relatives had a wheelchair specially ordered for them. They died before it was used, but there was no request for its return. I, however, delivered it back to the office. The same for other items. Patients could be requested to leave a deposit.

 

 

The NHS has enormous clout to get the cheapest prices not just on drugs, but numerous other items, like light bulbs, surgical gloves and so on, because it can buy in bulk. I don't feel that it uses its position well.

 

 

How much money is consumed by doctors using NHS facilities for private work? I know this happens.

 

 

I also know that many managers were given computer equipment that was not recovered when they left the organisation.

i agree with you , you could throw double the amount of money at the NHs and it would not make any differance . you need to have a full scale reform from top to bottom get rid of a lot of the dead wood you would find the money

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I find that insulting to the many hardworking NHS staff.

 

What illness do you believe the NHS can cure that it is deliberately keeping people ill?

 

The rabid conspiracy theorists claim it for some diseases but can never show it is more than deranged rantings. With today's Information Age : if it were true a whistle-blower would come forward, and come forward with proof, not "my dog's groomer's sister's heard it down the pub"!

 

I find it insulting that my young son has been told to be on liquid morphine for life (he's 35) because of a collapsed lumbar disc.

A spinal surgeon abroad and a private in UK both said that he would benefit greatly from disc replacement, but guess what???

NHS won't pay for it because in their books it's ok for a 35 year old man otherwise super fit to be on medication for the rest of his life.

I didn't believe this conspiracy theory when it was presented to me by a striking group of junior doctors, but now I do.

Another thing I'm strongly convinced about (and I find insulting) is that while nurses are committed to the patients, consultants and directors are looking at money instead of curing people.

One more example.

I had a sever earache last summer.

Was given antibiotics twice and nothing changed.

Decided to have a day trip to France and went to a&e there.

I was sent straight to a ENT doctor who diagnosed a perforated ear drum.

They gave me a prescription for drops and cortisone tablets, total cost €11.

They didn't ask for any id or health insurance so no cost to UK taxpayers either.

I suppose that's a basic human service that should be offered to every human being.

Not in UK, it costs money, the damn money running the world, the demoniac money who is destroying what makes humans different: empathy.

My say: screw this damn money and help people.

The same people who split the atom claim that they can't cure back pain, apparently the most common cause of illness in the world.

They just implement pain management which equals to medications so money for farmaceutical industry.

Strangely I have never heard of a doctor, politician or rich person to suffer back pain.

Could that be because they can afford to pay dirty money for treatment while the common man is convicted to life in pain???

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A spinal surgeon abroad and a private in UK both said that he would benefit greatly from disc replacement, but guess what???

NHS won't pay for it because in their books it's ok for a 35 year old man otherwise super fit to be on medication for the rest of his life.

 

It depends.

It depends on if the NHS are saying "won't operate now" vs "won't operate ever", while it also depends on if the private surgeon(s) is/are saying "I'll operate" because they are a private surgeon : they get paid for the operation ........

 

I didn't believe this conspiracy theory when it was presented to me by a striking group of junior doctors, but now I do.

 

Good news : today's junior doctors, tomorrow's consultants and senior GP's.

Why haven't these junior doctors publicised these claims, or can you provide a link to them?

 

Another thing I'm strongly convinced about (and I find insulting) is that while nurses are committed to the patients, consultants and directors are looking at money instead of curing people.

 

I repeat : today's junior doctors, tomorrow's consultants and senior GP's. if there was such a "conspiracy" : someone would reveal it, unless you are saying that ALL junior doctors loose their convictions along the way ......

 

One more example.

I had a sever earache last summer.

Was given antibiotics twice and nothing changed.

Decided to have a day trip to France and went to a&e there.

I was sent straight to a ENT doctor who diagnosed a perforated ear drum.

They gave me a prescription for drops and cortisone tablets, total cost €11.

They didn't ask for any id or health insurance so no cost to UK taxpayers either.

I suppose that's a basic human service that should be offered to every human being.

Not in UK, it costs money, the damn money running the world, the demoniac money who is destroying what makes humans different: empathy.

My say: screw this damn money and help people.

 

It depends (again, funnily enough!).

Were the antiibiotics you were given "empirical" (best guess) or based on cultures. If empirical : the whole point is empirical is the best choice without lab results and isn't guaranteed to be the correct Ines, just the most likely correct.

If guided by culture results : how can you say they weren't the right ones due to a conspiracy, unless the lab is in on the conspiracy too?

As for "eardrum perforated": ...... you guessed it ...... it depends!

Was the perforation missed (or ignored as part of a conspiracy!), or perhaps it wasn't there and you went to A&E in France due to ongoing symptoms - and the perforation had developed or become visible .....

 

 

The same people who split the atom claim that they can't cure back pain, apparently the most common cause of illness in the world.

They just implement pain management which equals to medications so money for farmaceutical industry.

Strangely I have never heard of a doctor, politician or rich person to suffer back pain.

Could that be because they can afford to pay dirty money for treatment while the common man is convicted to life in pain???

 

Right, Because all back pain is from one cause with one treatment, that is being bought by the rich and powerful but denied to you and me.

Your approach is a tad simplistic.

 

None of these show (let alone prove!) a conspiracy to keep people ill to keep them on medication.

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It depends.

It depends on if the NHS are saying "won't operate now" vs "won't operate ever", while it also depends on if the private surgeon(s) is/are saying "I'll operate" because they are a private surgeon : they get paid for the operation ........

 

 

 

Good news : today's junior doctors, tomorrow's consultants and senior GP's.

Why haven't these junior doctors publicised these claims, or can you provide a link to them?

 

 

 

I repeat : today's junior doctors, tomorrow's consultants and senior GP's. if there was such a "conspiracy" : someone would reveal it, unless you are saying that ALL junior doctors loose their convictions along the way ......

 

 

 

It depends (again, funnily enough!).

Were the antiibiotics you were given "empirical" (best guess) or based on cultures. If empirical : the whole point is empirical is the best choice without lab results and isn't guaranteed to be the correct Ines, just the most likely correct.

If guided by culture results : how can you say they weren't the right ones due to a conspiracy, unless the lab is in on the conspiracy too?

As for "eardrum perforated": ...... you guessed it ...... it depends!

Was the perforation missed (or ignored as part of a conspiracy!), or perhaps it wasn't there and you went to A&E in France due to ongoing symptoms - and the perforation had developed or become visible .....

 

 

 

 

Right, Because all back pain is from one cause with one treatment, that is being bought by the rich and powerful but denied to you and me.

Your approach is a tad simplistic.

 

None of these show (let alone prove!) a conspiracy to keep people ill to keep them on medication.

 

Sure enough though, the rich don't suffer back pain like common people because they have access to private medical care.

I'm talking about a simple worn disc with no complications whatsoever.

The NHS consultant clearly said that they can't operate on young patient because otherwise they would most likely need another operation in their 60s and it would cost too much to the NHS.

In other words you have to live in pain for all your youth and when you reach your late 50s they fix you.

In the mean time you have wasted half of your life fighting an illness that could have been cured and being on drugs for 20 odd years.

Doctors are part of the system, they can go along with it or nothing.

I suppose that if a doctor started operating young people they would soon be sacked for wasting NHS money.

"wasting" means cure people.

With regards to my ear drum perforation, the consultant said that it had been there for a while and he could see scar tissues.

So the nhs doctor who examined me missed this completely and reached for the prescription book on two occasions.

This meant that I spent £16.80 for antibiotics that cost a couple of quid over the border and did nothing except making my immune system weaker.

Who's benefiting from this???

If I had not gone abroad I would not have recovered from a simple problem also because for some crazy rules, in UK GPs don't prescribe cortisone unless you point a gun at them.

I used to think along your lines up to a couple of years ago, now I strongly believe that only money matters.

If you don't have a lot of it pray that you never get ill.

How come they don't widely use stem cells treatment that has proved positive?

Remember Fidel Castro?

He lived with lung cancer for 30 years and kept on smoking.

Coincidentally if you have enough money and connections you can get stem cells therapy in Cuba.

Remember Mr Bunga Bunga Berlusconi?

He was diagnosed with prostate cancer and immediately went on "holiday" to Cuba without having any treatment in Italy.

Came back 4 weeks later completely cancer free.

Remember Tony Blair?

He suffered a slipped disc and he was back in business in two days.

Instead us mere mortals are told that a slipped disc takes many many weeks to get better.

I find all of this very strange and I wish you were right, but you too don't have any evidence to support your defence of the NHS.

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I have to agree with some of the previous comments, the NHS have badly let down both me and my son. Had I been treated within a reasonable time following a very nasty assault, I probably would not now have PTSD and agoraphobia which are so deep-seated that all I can do is 'manage' their effects. I was also told twice by my GP that there was nothing wrong with my back - the implication being it was all in my head - only to find when my husband paid for me to go private out of sheer desperation that I had two fractured vertebrae and was in imminent danger of losing all function in my right leg.

My son has an hereditary condition, which I passed on unfortunately, which our GP practice should know all about, but when he kept going back with standard symptoms indicating the need for surgery, he also kept being told there was nothing wrong. We ended up taking him to A & E where he was treated conservatively in order to try to avoid emergency surgery and was discharged with the expectation that he would have elective surgery in 4-6 weeks. 4 months on and earlier this week I went to the GP with him as we've still not heard anything and all the GP can do is refer him to the surgeon, but there is currently a minimum wait of 22 weeks just for the out-patient appointment. The problem is getting steadily worse and we all know that he's likely to end up back in A & E within a month and have to go through the same emergency surgery that I did, which carries far more risks and long-term complications.

 

That said, no doubt our GPs are under enormous pressure to keep costs down by only referring people at death's door.

 

One thing which never ceases to bother me is that because I have a life-threatening condition which requires life long medication, I get free prescriptions. Fair enough, no one wants someone to die because they can't afford their prescription, but why not just make the essential drugs free rather than absolutely everything I am prescribed?


RMW

"If you want my parking space, please take my disability" Common car park sign in France.

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I have to agree with some of the previous comments, the NHS have badly let down both me and my son.

 

Does the NHS "get it wrong"? undoubtedly, it does sometimes.

When it does it could save money by being more open to admitting errors, and learning from them, rather than fighting making those admissions, resulting in people suing.

 

That is way different to allegations of a "conspiracy" (which I don't believe you are making, but another poster has).

Get it wrong, sometimes : yes. Conspiracy: no.

 

I

Had I been treated within a reasonable time following a very nasty assault, I probably would not now have PTSD and agoraphobia which are so deep-seated that all I can do is 'manage' their effects. I was also told twice by my GP that there was nothing wrong with my back - the implication being it was all in my head - only to find when my husband paid for me to go private out of sheer desperation that I had two fractured vertebrae and was in imminent danger of losing all function in my right leg.

My son has an hereditary condition, which I passed on unfortunately, which our GP practice should know all about, but when he kept going back with standard symptoms indicating the need for surgery, he also kept being told there was nothing wrong. We ended up taking him to A & E where he was treated conservatively in order to try to avoid emergency surgery and was discharged with the expectation that he would have elective surgery in 4-6 weeks. 4 months on and earlier this week I went to the GP with him as we've still not heard anything and all the GP can do is refer him to the surgeon, but there is currently a minimum wait of 22 weeks just for the out-patient appointment. The problem is getting steadily worse and we all know that he's likely to end up back in A & E within a month and have to go through the same emergency surgery that I did, which carries far more risks and long-term complications.

 

That said, no doubt our GPs are under enormous pressure to keep costs down by only referring people at death's door.

 

One thing which never ceases to bother me is that because I have a life-threatening condition which requires life long medication, I get free prescriptions. Fair enough, no one wants someone to die because they can't afford their prescription, but why not just make the essential drugs free rather than absolutely everything I am prescribed?

 

Admin costs of working out which is which?, or having a "fee-free" scrip system having to work alongside a "non-fee-free" system??

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The conspiracy theory was suggested to me by a group of junior doctors.

I laughed at them at the time, but I'm not laughing now.

Did I just repeat myself?

I must be getting old...

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Sure enough though, the rich don't suffer back pain like common people because they have access to private medical care.

I'm talking about a simple worn disc with no complications whatsoever.

The NHS consultant clearly said that they can't operate on young patient because otherwise they would most likely need another operation in their 60s and it would cost too much to the NHS.

In other words you have to live in pain for all your youth and when you reach your late 50s they fix you.

In the mean time you have wasted half of your life fighting an illness that could have been cured and being on drugs for 20 odd years.

Doctors are part of the system, they can go along with it or nothing.

I suppose that if a doctor started operating young people they would soon be sacked for wasting NHS money.

"wasting" means cure people.

With regards to my ear drum perforation, the consultant said that it had been there for a while and he could see scar tissues.

So the nhs doctor who examined me missed this completely and reached for the prescription book on two occasions.

This meant that I spent £16.80 for antibiotics that cost a couple of quid over the border and did nothing except making my immune system weaker.

Who's benefiting from this???

If I had not gone abroad I would not have recovered from a simple problem also because for some crazy rules, in UK GPs don't prescribe cortisone unless you point a gun at them.

I used to think along your lines up to a couple of years ago, now I strongly believe that only money matters.

If you don't have a lot of it pray that you never get ill.

How come they don't widely use stem cells treatment that has proved positive?

Remember Fidel Castro?

He lived with lung cancer for 30 years and kept on smoking.

Coincidentally if you have enough money and connections you can get stem cells therapy in Cuba.

Remember Mr Bunga Bunga Berlusconi?

He was diagnosed with prostate cancer and immediately went on "holiday" to Cuba without having any treatment in Italy.

Came back 4 weeks later completely cancer free.

Remember Tony Blair?

He suffered a slipped disc and he was back in business in two days.

Instead us mere mortals are told that a slipped disc takes many many weeks to get better.

I find all of this very strange and I wish you were right, but you too don't have any evidence to support your defence of the NHS.

 

So much wrong here (misunderstanding / misinformation regarding health economics, NHS prescriptions costs, operation complications / recurrence rates, antibiotics and the immune system), that I'll have to reply in more than 1 post (if I get time).

 

But, for now:

 

 

 

The NHS consultant clearly said that they can't operate on young patient because otherwise they would most likely need another operation in their 60s and it would cost too much to the NHS.

 

You'll note that I'd wondered about this earlier ..... since I'd said : It depends on if the NHS are saying "won't operate now" VSlink8.gif "won't operate ever"......

 

This meant that I spent £16.80 for antibiotics that cost a couple of quid over the border and did nothing except making my immune system weaker.

 

Yup, rip-off NHS, 'making £14.80' on those antibiotics that only cost a couple of quid.

Yet, what about the person who pays £14.80 for 2 prescriptions, one an antibiotic available in France for a quid or so, but the other costing many thousands ....... (so, erythropoietin, for example) ....... not quite such a rip-off now?.

 

for antibiotics that ........ did nothing except making my immune system weaker.

 

Ohh, tell us about how "antibiotics make the immune system weaker:. I do wish you would stop spouting tripe / getting yourself confused as to issues.

 

Inappropriate use / abuse of antibiotics drives antimicrobial resistance. Their prudent use (right indication, right antibiotic, right dose for the right length of time) will reduce the pressure driving antimicrobial resistance. That is a global health issue (well, the WHO says so, anyhow).

 

That is world's apart from "antibiotics weaken the immune system", though; (even if you do try and shrug it off with 'you say "tom-Ay-to", and I say "tom-AHH-toe"). One is about human's immune systems, the other about microbe's and their resistance to therapeutic agents.

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The conspiracy theory was suggested to me by a group of junior doctors.

I laughed at them at the time, but I'm not laughing now.

Did I just repeat myself?

I must be getting old...

 

Addressed above : surely they'd be publishing this?.

Are ALL these junior docs being silenced as they get to be consultants and senior GP's? Surely at least one would be whistle-blowing?.

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Also, what conspiracy theory were they putting forward? (since you haven't made that clear!_)

 

Your original one (NHS in conspiracy to keep people ill deliberately, so drug companies can make money),

or, Gov't under-funding NHS to bring in 'death by 1000 cuts', with creeping privitisation as a result (that'd be a conspiracy AGAINST the NHS, not BY the NHS!), or some other that you want to keep alluding to but without specifying?.

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Inappropriate use / abuse of antibiotics drives antimicrobial resistance. Their prudent use (right indication, right antibiotic, right dose for the right length of time) will reduce the pressure driving antimicrobial resistance. That is a global health issue (well, the WHO says so, anyhow).

 

Go again mate?!?!

Remember, I'm not a neurosurgeon, I can barely read and write my name in capital letters...

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Also, what conspiracy theory were they putting forward? (since you haven't made that clear!_)

 

Your original one (NHS in conspiracy to keep people ill deliberately, so drug companies can make money),

or, Gov't under-funding NHS to bring in 'death by 1000 cuts', with creeping privitisation as a result (that'd be a conspiracy AGAINST the NHS, not BY the NHS!), or some other that you want to keep alluding to but without specifying?.

 

No, exactly that one about keeping patients alive but not cure them.

Don't get me wrong, I don't believe that doctors sit around the table and say: "we must keep people ill", but the system is designed to do exactly that.

Long delays in treatment, wrong medications, great cuts in essential areas of NHS while money is burned in stupid political games, etc, result in keeping patient unnecessarily ill for longer than due and in some cases permanently disable them.

Higher power design this, not the gp down the road or the consultant at the hospital, but they are part of the mechanism which would reject them if they "waste" money.

Again, "waste" equals "cure people at once".

I'm sure that some of them are frustrated about it, but bills must be paid right?

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Go again mate?!?!

Remember, I'm not a neurosurgeon,

 

who says neurosurgeons arent as bad at over-using / misusing antibiotics?. Anyhow:

 

Overusing antibiotics / using them wrongly, such as:

antibiotics when it is a viral infection, so they won't work, or

too broad an antibiotic when a narrower spectrum one will do, or

using them for longer than needed, or

using them for too little time, or

too low a dose,

makes it more likely that there will be microbes that are resistant to antibiotics, making it harder to get "the right antibiotic' when antibiotics are needed. I hope that is a bit simpler for you.

 

I can barely read and write my name in capital letters...

 

I'd avoided voicing my suspicions until now, but you didn't have to confirm it.

 

However, don't think you've managed to distract from where you were going to tell us about antibiotics making the immune system 'weaker'

antibiotics that ........ did nothing except making my immune system weaker.

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who says neurosurgeons arent as bad at over-using / misusing antibiotics?. Anyhow:

 

Overusing antibiotics / using them wrongly, such as:

antibiotics when it is a viral infection, so they won't work, or

too broad an antibiotic when a narrower spectrum one will do, or

using them for longer than needed, or

using them for too little time, or

too low a dose,

makes it more likely that there will be microbes that are resistant to antibiotics, making it harder to get "the right antibiotic' when antibiotics are needed. I hope that is a bit simpler for you.

 

 

 

I'd avoided voicing my suspicions until now, but you didn't have to confirm it.

 

However, don't think you've managed to distract from where you were going to tell us about antibiotics making the immune system 'weaker'

 

 

I have printed your previous lesson about antibiotics and will show it to my gp next time she tells me that "antibiotics weaken the immune system"...

Was just repeating her words.

Thanks for clarifying Prof Bazza, I'll check if they do evening courses at my local primary school so maybe one day i could have the honour to attend your classes...

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I have printed your previous lesson about antibiotics and will show it to my gp next time she tells me that "antibiotics weaken the immune system"...

Was just repeating her words.

Thanks for clarifying Prof Bazza, I'll check if they do evening courses at my local primary school so maybe one day i could have the honour to attend your classes...

 

If she really believes that then she needs my 'lesson'. And a bit more CPD on top.

 

Much more likely though is she knows it already, but (as demonstrated by your attitude here), you either are resistant to explanation or require things grossly oversimplified.

 

GP's are under so much pressure (as is the rest of the NHS), that sometimes they are faced with a sub-group of people where the best option is to oversimplify : there simply isn't the time, in surgery, to explain fully to people who will just argue the toss.

It says more about you than it does the GP, though.

 

Mind you it also says more about you being willing to post something your GP said, and argue the toss about it, without checking it (considering the GP may have been oversimplifying it to get you out of her busy surgery).

 

I'm glad I was able to "dumb it down" sufficiently for you.

I do try and fit things to my target audience.

If that is the local primary school, or a group of professionals : I can adjust.

 

If you feel primary school is more suited to your learning needs : good luck.

 

By the way, do you think my comments on antibiotics are wrong or accurate?

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If she really believes that then she needs my 'lesson'. And a bit more CPD on top.

 

Much more likely though is she knows it already, but (as demonstrated by your attitude here), you either are resistant to explanation or require things grossly oversimplified.

 

GP's are under so much pressure (as is the rest of the NHS), that sometimes they are faced with a sub-group of people where the best option is to oversimplify : there simply isn't the time, in surgery, to explain fully to people who will just argue the toss.

It says more about you than it does the GP, though.

 

Mind you it also says more about you being willing to post something your GP said, and argue the toss about it, without checking it (considering the GP may have been oversimplifying it to get you out of her busy surgery).

 

I'm glad I was able to "dumb it down" sufficiently for you.

I do try and fit things to my target audience.

If that is the local primary school, or a group of professionals : I can adjust.

 

If you feel primary school is more suited to your learning needs : good luck.

 

By the way, do you think my comments on antibiotics are wrong or accurate?

 

No, I believe you, even though I should believe more the word of a professional gp.

But I understand that being as thick as a dead cow the gp might have just rushed me off the door with that.

I wish I had a tenth of your grey matter, maybe I would be able to get a proper job instead of surfing the internet on a Saturday afternoon...

Lucky you!

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