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Good afternoon,

I'm after some work related advise;

I work in a kitchen with four other people - 4 of us have "contracts" that are 5/7 & 1 is a weekend worker-

Over the last three months 3 of us have changed our rota to meet the needs of the business - mixed shifts / later shifts & also 1 weekend in three - the fourth person that has a 5/7 contract has now point blank refused to do the same & apparently has said "she'll leave & she can't do weekends or late shifts" now we are at a stage were the three of us are really ****ed off due to this person, while we've bent over backwards to "meet the needs of the business" she is getting away with dictating what she will & won't work, so we are after some advise on how to handle this situation with our management,

We are considering also putting in a grievance regarding this colleague due to the state she leaves the place in half of our paperwork is legal requirements which she is not filling in & also talking to us on several occasions in a not very nice manner, she doesn't clean down & does as little as possible

When she started there, over a year ago I make several verbal complaints about her standards & also documented the state of the kitchen with pictures in an email - we have all recently taken photos again about the state of the kitchen so we have some "evidence" again after some advise on how to deal with the situation as a whole

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Hi grumpytisaytheleast,

Me & this "difficult" one are on the same pay grade (totally different jobs)

Two are catering assistants 5/7 & 1 weekend staff (who happens to be "difficult" ones daughter)

From what I've been told is she told the manager she would have to leave as she couldn't do those hours, as she has her granddaughter but we all know that she doesn't have her every weekend - she's only expected to do 1 in 4 which isn't unreasonable especially when everyone else is doing the same

The other catering staff have kids & grand kids too, but as we have a rolling rota they work round us, not us round them.

She is also "retired" & tells us pretty much every week "I don't need to be here" & "I don't need to work" "I'm just here for extra spending money"

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Whilst you aim all your irks and animosity towards the other employee your employer will be sat back getting the job done.

 

Your issue is with the employer not the person, they may have a tighter contract and be resisting "voluntary change" for all you know, just because you agree to change it does not force everybody else to.

 

You need to raise the issue with the employer and ask when working patterns are changed why only a selection of staff are being involved. Even then unless this person has no right to refuse or they are being treated more favourably than others outside the employers knowledge there is often little you can do apart from argue from a fairness aspect.

 

Don't hate the player, hate the game

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Hi Alison,

Thanks for your advise;

It is actually the "difficult" ones tantrum that has led us down this road, originally when the new rota was done, they said & I quote " if she doesn't like it then she can leave" because she's had this tantrum they have back tracked for reasons unknown

She's remiss in her duties & thinks she can dictate what's going to happen.

I've been told the manager left us a note Friday night to tell us of the "new" rota change & that it is to start this Monday, so we've had no consultation with management or been formally told, I've spoken to the other two & we are currently writing a grievance

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The other employee's position sounds fair. If they don't want to work weekends, and would resign if they were made to work weekends, that person is entitled to take that position. It is really up to the employer whether they find someone else or whether they stick with him/her.

 

Although obviously if he/she doesn't do her job properly that is a different issue.

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If I had a penny every time "business needs" were invoked to stitch workers up I'd be a millionaire.

And if I had a penny for every employee allowed to do what they want because otherwise they shout loud and trow tantrums... Well you know how it goes.

Unfortunately this troublemaker is in a position where she doesn't care to lose her job, so she can pull the ropes as much as she wants.

A grievance is the best way to go for now.

I used to be a flexible, committed employee, until I found that I was being stitched up (with many others) because I wouldn't complain.

Now, as soon as someone does or says something detrimental to me personally I would make a lot of noise and escalate (unnecessarily) to the highest management level.

Strange enough, I only had to do that once and since then (a couple of years ago), they've left me alone and praise my work at every opportunity (again unnecessarily).

Managers are like wolves: They attack the weakest prey that will go down without a fight.

Please note: This is my personal experience and point of view, I'm sure that many companies out there tackle sloppy employees and reward the good ones, involving them in every decision (or maybe not).

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I was assertive at work in attempting to get my holidays. I got punished with a promotion

PLEASE HELP US TO KEEP THIS SITE RUNNING

EVERY POUND DONATED WILL HELP US TO KEEP HELPING OTHERS

 

 

 

 

 

The SabreSheep, All information is offered on good faith and based on mine and others experiences. I am not a qualified legal professional and you should always seek legal advice if you are unsure of your position.

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Managers are like wolves: They attack the weakest prey that will go down without a fight.

 

I agree with the sentiment but it isn't just managers, using a more scientific and temperate term we all "follow the path of least resistance".

 

This means managers ask the one who won't complain/kick off and staff ask the manager known for being the one they will get the least grief from.

 

Simple human nature.

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I agree with the sentiment but it isn't just managers, using a more scientific and temperate term we all "follow the path of least resistance".

 

This means managers ask the one who won't complain/kick off and staff ask the manager known for being the one they will get the least grief from.

 

Simple human nature.

 

I now use a different technique: I ask outrageous annual leave to the most feared manager and he never turned it down.

Must feel important or scared to be asked as nobody else asks him.

One way or another I get the leave I want 😁

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