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And not before time as well!! IMI Press release today.


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The Institute of the Motor Industry (IMI) is calling on MPs to licence the automotive retail sector,

in a new lobbying campaign set to begin when parliament returns from recess.

 

IMI will tell MPs that according to newly conducted consumer research,

over 70% of voters think it’s already a requirement for technicians in the motor industry to hold a licence to practise.

 

The call follows news that the Government plans to have driverless cars on UK roads by 2015.

The IMI believes the implications of this new technology represent the final straw in the need for legislation.

 

They will argue that modern vehicle technology has reached a level where regulation is necessary

to ensure automotive technicians are currently competent - for the safety of motorists.

 

The IMI has received the “in principle” support of several major companies and organisations for licensing

including REMIT, AutoGlass, Inchcape UK, John Clarke Motor Group and TrustFord.

 

The Institute will look to build a consensus in the independent aftermarket during the campaign.

 

IMI CEO, Steve Nash explained:

The imminent prospect of autonomous vehicles on UK roads makes the issue of licensing extremely urgent.

The proliferation of hybrid vehicles and complex driver assist systems has already increased the skills requirements

for effective and safe working on modern vehicles.

 

Service technicians without the proper training are increasingly putting themselves and motorists at risk.

 

Our parliamentary research suggests that MPs currently see the motor industry as low skilled, low paid and dirty.

It is vital that they and the public come to a better understanding of the requirements necessary to work on modern vehicles,

especially with a new wave of technology on the horizon.

 

The template for licensing already exists in the Professional Register, so there is no excuse.

 

Many skilled operators in the industry are already calling for licensing, so they aren’t forced to compete with rogue traders,

who undercut them, further damaging the reputation of the sector and putting motorists at risk.”

 

According to the charity Brake, in 2011, 2,125 crashes in Britain were caused by vehicle defects as a result of inadequate maintenance,

52 of them causing deaths.

 

About the Institute of the Motor Industry (IMI):

The Institute of the Motor Industry (IMI) is the professional body for individuals working in the motor industry

and the authoritative voice of the retail automotive sector.

 

The IMI’s aim is to ensure that the automotive retail sector has a skilled, competent and professional workforce that is fully equipped

to keep pace with the demands of new technology and changing markets, through careers advice,

IMI qualifications, accreditations and membership.

 

The IMI’s Professional Register aims to drive up standards across the automotive industry,

providing consumers and customers with added confidence in the industry and the professionals who drive it.

 

Please visit www.theimi.org.uk to find out more.

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Our parliamentary research suggests that MPs currently see the motor industry as low skilled, low paid and dirty

Whereas the public see them as all that plus a rip-off institution.

 

 

I would put the biggest cause of lack of knowledge and professionalism on the disappearance of indentured apprenticeships. A couple of months at some government establishment hardly prepares anyone.

Of course this has a lot to do with the motor industry employers not being bothered with real apprenticeships, an NVQ (no vehicle qualification) is of no use to anyone.

 

 

What is proposed is a splendid idea and might end the system of plug it in, believe what it says and if that don't cure it, try something else. All the non-fixes because it wasn't that are expected to be paid for by the motorist.

Diagnose the 'real' problem and fix it at least cost is all anyone asks for.

 

 

And if this system would make the industry more professional, then I'm all for it.

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i would be against

 

always do own repairs (short of engine rebuild) at home

 

everything from, alternators, brakes, coils, to full suspension arms

 

always put receipt for parts stapled into service book

Please note:

 

  • I am employed in the IT sector of a high street retail chain but am not posting in any official capacity,so therefore any comments,suggestions or opinions are expressly personal ones and should not be viewed as an endorsement or with agreement of any company.
  • i am not legal trained in any form.
  • I have many experiences in life and do often use these in my posts

if ive been helpful kick my scales, if ive been unhelpful kick the scales of the person more helpful :eek:

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You should try a full rebuild as well. There is nothing more satisfying than turning the key on an engine you have completely stripped, had rebored and reground and rebuilt yourself.

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Whereas the public see them as all that plus a rip-off institution.

 

 

I would put the biggest cause of lack of knowledge and professionalism on the disappearance of indentured apprenticeships. A couple of months at some government establishment hardly prepares anyone.

Of course this has a lot to do with the motor industry employers not being bothered with real apprenticeships, an NVQ (no vehicle qualification) is of no use to anyone.

 

 

What is proposed is a splendid idea and might end the system of plug it in, believe what it says and if that don't cure it, try something else. All the non-fixes because it wasn't that are expected to be paid for by the motorist.

Diagnose the 'real' problem and fix it at least cost is all anyone asks for.

 

 

And if this system would make the industry more professional, then I'm all for it.

 

I think from what I've seen in over thirty years Conniff, this is very true. It's not helped either by manufacturers building evermore complexity into vehicle systems and then taking cost out of the engineering. But then the argument is that's what the customer wants.

 

As you know, I work all over the world in the industry and what I find interesting is the standard of technicians and their abilities varies immensely. I think it would be fair to say that the worst I have seen are in the so called developed countries, the UK and USA in particular and some of the best are in the BRIC markets.

 

Personally I think the automotive industry in the UK needs regulation, I've been stating this for some time and it needs to follow a model similar to the aviation industry.

 

As regards the "home mechanic".....well what happened with the gas industry and domestic electrical I think speaks for itself.

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Well, this is a turn up for the books, an article on CAG about the IMI. This suggestion has been a talking point for ages in MA's around the country.

 

Looks like Conniff's 'list' is going to get longer, or shorter, depending on your viewpoint.

 

H

44 years at the pointy end of the motor trade. :eek:

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You should try a full rebuild as well. There is nothing more satisfying than turning the key on an engine you have completely stripped, had rebored and reground and rebuilt yourself.

 

that takes time, and with 3 children, 7 nephews/neices and inlaws that are always needing help i just dont get time

 

did it once while on a "no vehicle qualification" (which i quit half way through) for mechanicing (went into computing instead - now theres a mistake)

Please note:

 

  • I am employed in the IT sector of a high street retail chain but am not posting in any official capacity,so therefore any comments,suggestions or opinions are expressly personal ones and should not be viewed as an endorsement or with agreement of any company.
  • i am not legal trained in any form.
  • I have many experiences in life and do often use these in my posts

if ive been helpful kick my scales, if ive been unhelpful kick the scales of the person more helpful :eek:

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