Jump to content


style="text-align: center;">  

Thread Locked

because no one has posted on it for the last 2704 days.

If you need to add something to this thread then

 

Please click the "Report " link

 

at the bottom of one of the posts.

 

If you want to post a new story then

Please

Start your own new thread

That way you will attract more attention to your story and get more visitors and more help 

 

Thanks

Recommended Posts

Hello all.

 

I got a laptop from a Currys PC World store in December 2012 with KnowHow Whatever Happens protection.

 

When I was comparing laptops and remarked that the one I was about to choose had too little RAM,

the salesperson said that more RAM can be added and installed in-store for £50, so this service was also bought.

 

About a couple of weeks after the laptop was bought, it started freezing:

the screen would become grainy and the computer would not respond to mouse clicks or keyboard input.

 

At first, I thought that this was a one-off incident,

but when it started happening more frequently, I took some videos of it and called KnowHow support.

They walked me through uninstalling and reinstalling the graphics drivers.

 

For about a week, the problem did not happen, but then it started happening again.

 

I called KnowHow support again, and this time, they told me to reset the computer.

They walked me through the process, and at one point, Windows asked me whether I was sure that I wanted to reset the recovery partition;

I relayed the question to the support staff, and they told me to confirm the reset.

I knew what this was going to do, but I followed their advice because I did not want them to say that it was broken because I failed to follow their instructions.

 

When I logged back in, the recovery partition was empty, and the problem was still there.

 

I took the laptop to a Currys PC World branch and described the original problem, and the new one: the recovery partition being gone.

 

They returned it after a few weeks, saying that the issue had now been fixed.

The recovery partition now had OneKey recovery files back on it,

but the initial problem where the screen would become grainy and the computer would freeze was still there.

 

I took the laptop back to them again, and it was returned, allegedly fixed.

It wasn't.

 

I took it back to them a third time, and reminded them that they had told me that if I take it back to them three times for the same fault,

they would replace the machine.

 

They said that they would try to fix it, first.

 

Four weeks later, I phoned them up and put in a request to replace it because they are supposed to get back to me within that time.

They said that even if they replace the product, they won't include the RAM upgrade.

About two days later, they said that the laptop was fixed, and I went to the store to pick it up.

 

After a few weeks of usage, I noticed that the screen problem was back. I still have the KnowHow protection,

but it seems that whenever I take the computer back, all they are doing is claiming that the problem is fixed, without actually fixing the problem.

 

I am not even sure whether they know the cause of the problem.

I fear that if I take it back to the store, the same thing will happen again: it would be returned to me after some weeks, allegedly repaired,

and I would find out later that the problem is still there.

 

I would like to know what I can do about this.

 

Are there any consumer protection laws that allow me to get a refund from Currys PC World for this faulty product

and buy a laptop from a store like Argos that has a better reputation for good customer support?

 

Thanks.

Link to post
Share on other sites

if you have a good documented timeline on this

i'm sure the whatever happens T&C refer to the situation whereby replacement/refund applies.

 

as a SIDE ISSUE.

 

have you tried running the lappy without the extra ram?

 

many graphics issues are caused by the wrong/faulty RAM chips.

 

i'd check they HAVE put the right type in for your lappy

quite easy on the net to do.

please don't hit Quote...just type we know what we said earlier..

DCA's view debtors as suckers, marks and mugs

NO DCA has ANY legal powers whatsoever on ANY debt no matter what it's Type

and they

are NOT and can NEVER  be BAILIFFS. even if a debt has been to court..

If everyone stopped blindly paying DCA's Tomorrow, their industry would collapse overnight... 

Link to post
Share on other sites

If they haven't put the right memory in, the machine would refuse to boot. That's assuming they could even physically install the wrong SODIMM, as they are physically 'keyed' to the correct type of memory slot. That said, I did once witness a PC World ("we're the experts") successfully shoehorn a SIMM into a PCI slot........!

 

However, "right memory" is not quite the same as "appropriate" - its possible to fit the 'right type' of memory (SODIMM DDR3 non-ECC, but dont worry about the jargon), which is inappropriate because it is too slow for your laptop - the closest analogy is putting petrol in a car, but putting ordinary unleaded into an engine that really requires Premium Superunleaded.

 

The extra SDIMM may be faulty, though this would more likely manifest itself in other ways, so it is still worth taking the extra memory out (usually, there is one or more panels on the bottom of the machine, fixed with a single screw. With the laptop physically power off, turn over, unscrew, remove panel, remove the SODIMM. It looks like a rectangular card with black chips on it. Turn machine back on, and see if the screen issue persists.

 

What make and model laptop is it? This should also be on the rear of the laptop. An example, mine is a Lenovo Thinkpad T420, type 4180-A32 and a serial number. If you can provide this, together with any information on the SODIMM (ie Crucial Memory A123XYZ), can work out what type of memory the laptop needs, and whether the SODIMM supplied is appropriate for that laptop.

Link to post
Share on other sites
After a few weeks of usage, I noticed that the screen problem was back. I still have the KnowHow protection, but it seems that whenever I take the computer back, all they are doing is claiming that the problem is fixed, without actually fixing the problem.

 

Write to head office, quoting your policy number etc. Say that the laptop remains faulty after three repairs and you now wish to receive a new replacement as promised by the Whatever Happens cover. Don't provide a phone number, and tell them you wish to have their response in writing.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for all the responses. My laptop is a Lenovo Ideapad U410 4376, S/N QB05997760. Would it affect my KnowHow cover if I opened up the laptop myself and removed the extra RAM?

 

The Whatever Happens terms and conditions say that if they cannot repair the product within 21 days, I can request a replacement. Unfortunately, it doesn't say that they have to give me the replacement. I'll start writing the letter.

Link to post
Share on other sites

changing/testing ram does not invalidate anything.

 

dx

please don't hit Quote...just type we know what we said earlier..

DCA's view debtors as suckers, marks and mugs

NO DCA has ANY legal powers whatsoever on ANY debt no matter what it's Type

and they

are NOT and can NEVER  be BAILIFFS. even if a debt has been to court..

If everyone stopped blindly paying DCA's Tomorrow, their industry would collapse overnight... 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Had a quick look at your Lenovo warranty status, and regrettably it expired 23rd Dec. Not that it matters, as your complaint lies with Currys.

 

The hardware manual for the Ideapad can be found at Lenovo, and it details the removal of the Ideapad rear cover and battery pack to access the DIMM slot. Its not quite the same as a laptop, which often use a small flap allowing external access. Given Curry's have opened the rear cover several times, I don't think they could argue that would cause any damage by doing so! If

 

Hardware guide is here

 

http://download.lenovo.com/consumer/mobiles_pub/ideapad_u310_u410_hmm_1st_edition_mar_2012_english.pdf

 

Remove the DIMM, post the details on here, leave it out and test the Ideapad again. Assuming the problem persists, take it back and demand a replacement then and there; its been back three or four times, it has been with Curry's for longer than 21days in total for the same problem, and the problem has never been solved.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Recently Browsing   0 Caggers

    No registered users viewing this page.


  • Have we helped you ...?


×
×
  • Create New...