Jump to content


Between

moving to income related ESA - will I stay on protected contributory ESA rate?

style="text-align:center;"> Please note that this topic has not had any new posts for the last 2207 days.

If you are trying to post a different story then you should start your own new thread. Posting on this thread is likely to mean that you won't get the help and advice that you need.

If you are trying to post information which is relevant to the story in this thread then please flag it up to the site team and they will allow you to post.

Thank you

Recommended Posts

Hi,

 

I was on Incapacity Benefit and moved to Contributory ESA for a year. I'm now moving to Income Related ESA but because I've gotten some money this year I will be a bit over the £6,000 savings rate to get the full amount.

 

When I moved to Contributory ESA the amount I got was protected and I got the same as I had on Incapacity Benefit. Will I continue to get this rate on Income Related ESA even though I have some savings?

 

By the way, even though I got about £20 more than i would normally on ESA because I was on this protected rate. All that actually happened is that they took that £20 off my Housing benefit because I was "getting too much".

 

Thanks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you've over £6000 in savings, for every £250 (or part of) they deduct £1 a week from income based ESA.

 

Income based ESA entitles you to full housing benefit for your situation.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Are you in support group or wrag?


We hang the petty thieves and appoint the great ones to public office ~ Aesop

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm in the work group. I got it on appeal and the appeal gave me 18 months. So I've had 12 months contributory and now going into 6 months income based before renewal.

 

I got about £7,500 recently from a payout and I know that everything over £6,000 is "taxed" but I suddenly wondered if my "protected rate" of ESA, the amount I originally got with Incapacity Benefit would continue to apply so the savings didn't matter??

 

Thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think that the protected rate is worked out as what's called an "applicable amount", meaning before any deductions. So you might expect to lose £6 per week or so once you move to ESA(IR).


PLEASE HELP US TO KEEP THIS SITE RUNNING. EVERY POUND DONATED WILL HELP US TO KEEP HELPING OTHERS

 

 

The idea that all politicians lie is music to the ears of the most egregious liars.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks, unfortunate it is that way.

 

I also feel like I'm not allowed to spend my savings as I would wish now.

 

I want to help a family member out with some money because they've had some unexpected bills for essential things. They've helped me out before many times but if I give them some money I'm going to be seen as being fraudulent aren't I? Like I'm reducing my savings on purpose.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I want to help a family member out with some money because they've had some unexpected bills for essential things. They've helped me out before many times but if I give them some money I'm going to be seen as being fraudulent aren't I? Like I'm reducing my savings on purpose.

 

It's not fraudulent to spend your savings - benefit fraud is a crime and spending your own money the way you choose is not an offence. What can happen, though, is the application of rules regarding "deprivation of capital". The idea behind deprivation is that if you spend savings unnecessarily in order to increase your benefit entitlement, you could be treated as still having the money when your benefit is calculated.

 

Of course, what's "necessary" spending is something of a grey area. If your car is falling to bits and you need a new one to get around, or if your central heating boiler breaks down and is condemned, it's not likely that it would be seen as deprivation if you spent some money. At the other extreme, if you take a two week holiday to Disneyland, chances are that could be seen as deprivation. Each case is decided on its merits, so it's hard to give general guidance.

 

I stress again, though, that as long as all the money is declared and you're upfront about what it was spent on, fraud is not a concern. So while helping out your family member may not increase your weekly benefit payments, it won't get you in legal trouble if that's what you choose to do.


PLEASE HELP US TO KEEP THIS SITE RUNNING. EVERY POUND DONATED WILL HELP US TO KEEP HELPING OTHERS

 

 

The idea that all politicians lie is music to the ears of the most egregious liars.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 Caggers

    No registered users viewing this page.


  • Have we helped you ...?


×
×
  • Create New...