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I'm sorry but you are only half right. OK say you believe that you can't work because of an illness or a disability. The first thing you should look at is what descriptor could I get evidence for. Lets say that you have difficulty lifting both hands to just below chest level due to pain or disability. That by itself will give you ESA and see you in the Support Group. That by itself may not stop you from operating a keyboard at a normal level - which is well below chest level.

Let's say that you have a difficulty walking up to 50 metres without being in severe discomfort. Could you use a manual wheelchair yes but you haven't got the funds to pay for one. That wouldn't stop you from working in a job that requires you to sit down. Yet you would qualify for ESA and be put in the Support Group. Let's say that you are not able to socialise due to a phobia or mental illness, that too would put you in the Support Group yet wouldn't stop you doing some work.

 

Simply put you need not be that ill or disabled, yet you would be entitled to ESA.

 

I actually meet more than one of these Support Group descriptors which have been proven medically, but to be honest I can't say that I am too ill to work! They are certainly nothing to do with not being able to work. Yes I do have various conditions and because of those I have proven that I fit various descriptors, but none are stopping me from working. I just qualify under what the government have deemed 'proves' that I am unfit for work. Whether I am or not has nothing to do with it.

 

ESA is all about descriptors and points and NOT about how ill you think or believe you are.

 

someone has clearly had a bad time previously getting ESA one might think

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There's no need to be so bloody picky.

 

I'm not and I am sorry if you think that.

But it is very important to concentrate on the descriptors and points for both PIP and ESA than it is to gather evidence supporting the fact that you believe you are too ill to work or are severely disabled.

 

Your illness/disability is secondary to proving which descriptor you are applying under and what points you are trying to obtain.

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someone has clearly had a bad time previously getting ESA one might think

 

Thanks, yes I did back in 2009, I was totally green and thought that the DWP would contact all of my medical advisors and that my conditions would form the basis of an award being given. I soon found out that that was not the case.

 

So I went back to basics looking at what the DWP are testing. It then dawned on me that it wasn't what was wrong with me but how I was able to prove that a descriptor applied to me. I have spent years reading and researching to find ways around the ESA system. Once all of that was in my head, I applied it with the appeal and won before it ever went near a Tribunal. I went from 0 points to Support Group for 3 years! Since then I have had an ESA review and based entirely on the ESA50 I was kept in the Support Group for another 3 years.

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Hi cookie monster how does your Pernicious Anaemia effect you. What comment as your doctor made about your haemoglobin? is it low. If it low, what is the lowest it as been? what level does it average.

 

The reason I ask is that I know someone who had a consistently low Hb (haemoglobin) and he successfully made a claim for ESA. Like you he had other conditions

 

Below are some of the symptoms of Pernicious Anaemia .

 

The first symptoms will be tiredness and palpitations (awareness of heartbeat).

Shortness of breath and dizziness (fainting) are also common.

If the anaemia is severe, it can result in angina (chest pain), headache and leg pains (intermittent claudication).

Red, sore tongue and mouth.

Weight loss.

Diarrhoea.

Some people with vitamin B12 deficiency will experience symptoms in their nervous system first, such as:

altered or reduced sense of touch

less sensitivity to vibration (inability to feel the vibrations of a tuning fork)

colour blindness

tingling in the hands and feet

muscle weakness

difficulties with walking and coordination

psychological symptoms, such as memory loss, confusion and depression.

 

 

AS you can see there are a number of areas which could be used with the descriptors for ESA. especially when it is in regard to safety. Have you ever been dizzy or fainted if so how many times a week. Do any activities make this condition worse. How many stairs can you climb before becoming short of breath, how long does it take to recover. There are many question you need to ask yourself when filling out the form and matching descriptors to your condition.

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It's reasonable for you to say you can't do something if doing so hurts, it leaves you fatigued, you can't repeat it, etc.

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Hi cookie monster how does your Pernicious Anaemia effect you. What comment as your doctor made about your haemoglobin? is it low. If it low, what is the lowest it as been? what level does it average.

 

The reason I ask is that I know someone who had a consistently low Hb (haemoglobin) and he successfully made a claim for ESA. Like you he had other conditions

 

Below are some of the symptoms of Pernicious Anaemia .

 

The first symptoms will be tiredness and palpitations (awareness of heartbeat).

Shortness of breath and dizziness (fainting) are also common.

If the anaemia is severe, it can result in angina (chest pain), headache and leg pains (intermittent claudication).

Red, sore tongue and mouth.

Weight loss.

Diarrhoea.

Some people with vitamin B12 deficiency will experience symptoms in their nervous system first, such as:

altered or reduced sense of touch

less sensitivity to vibration (inability to feel the vibrations of a tuning fork)

colour blindness

tingling in the hands and feet

muscle weakness

difficulties with walking and coordination

psychological symptoms, such as memory loss, confusion and depression.

 

 

AS you can see there are a number of areas which could be used with the descriptors for ESA. especially when it is in regard to safety. Have you ever been dizzy or fainted if so how many times a week. Do any activities make this condition worse. How many stairs can you climb before becoming short of breath, how long does it take to recover. There are many question you need to ask yourself when filling out the form and matching descriptors to your condition.

 

Those in red are the ones I would start looking for evidence of as they are directly related to the descriptors

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Those in red are the ones I would start looking for evidence of as they are directly related to the descriptors

 

I agree, Altered or reduced sense of touch can also be a good one.

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Those in red are the ones I would start looking for evidence of as they are directly related to the descriptors

 

I agree, Altered or reduced sense of touch can also be a good one.

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I received a written response to my complaint which I am not happy with, I have written a response and informed them should I not be happy with their next response then I will be writing to the Independent Case Examiner.

 

Also, I have put at the bottom of the letter about withdrawing my consent, this letter will be scanned and sent via recorded delivery.

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Hi cookie monster how does your Pernicious Anaemia effect you. What comment as your doctor made about your haemoglobin? is it low. If it low, what is the lowest it as been? what level does it average.

 

The reason I ask is that I know someone who had a consistently low Hb (haemoglobin) and he successfully made a claim for ESA. Like you he had other conditions

 

Below are some of the symptoms of Pernicious Anaemia .

 

The first symptoms will be tiredness and palpitations (awareness of heartbeat).

Shortness of breath and dizziness (fainting) are also common.

If the anaemia is severe, it can result in angina (chest pain), headache and leg pains (intermittent claudication).

Red, sore tongue and mouth.

Weight loss.

Diarrhoea.

Some people with vitamin B12 deficiency will experience symptoms in their nervous system first, such as:

altered or reduced sense of touch

less sensitivity to vibration (inability to feel the vibrations of a tuning fork)

colour blindness

tingling in the hands and feet

muscle weakness

difficulties with walking and coordination

psychological symptoms, such as memory loss, confusion and depression.

 

 

AS you can see there are a number of areas which could be used with the descriptors for ESA. especially when it is in regard to safety. Have you ever been dizzy or fainted if so how many times a week. Do any activities make this condition worse. How many stairs can you climb before becoming short of breath, how long does it take to recover. There are many question you need to ask yourself when filling out the form and matching descriptors to your condition.

 

Hi,

 

Well I get Diarrhoea although that could be related to the B12 or my Irritable Bowel Syndrome or both, I have lots of tingling (I'm seeing a Neurologist in 2 weeks.)

 

I have weakness, my memory isn't great, I do get a sore mouth and tongue, I definitely have nervous system issues.

 

I also do get dizziness and feeling lightheaded, palpitations and shortness of breath (this could be the B12 or my Asthma or both.)

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Hi,

 

Well I get Diarrhoea although that could be related to the B12 or my Irritable Bowel Syndrome or both, I have lots of tingling (I'm seeing a Neurologist in 2 weeks.)

 

I have weakness, my memory isn't great, I do get a sore mouth and tongue, I definitely have nervous system issues.

 

I also do get dizziness and feeling lightheaded, palpitations and shortness of breath (this could be the B12 or my Asthma or both.)

 

cookiemonster it could also be related to your Anaemia. The normal range for Hb in a male is between 14 to 18 my friends tended to run on average between 8 to 10. This means that he would only have around 50 to 60% of the normal ability to transport oxygen in the blood. Any physical activity made him short of breath very quickly it also made him dizzy feel faint etc. Due to this it was dangerous for him to carry out repeated activities. You have asthma on top of your anaemia look at the descriptors and see how your symptoms can match them.

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I'm going to wait until I've seen the Neurologist at the end of October and seen my GP again along with the Gastroentorologist before I decide whether to make a claim for ESA because I need to know what is causing my issues and whether it's going to affect me being able to work because my health has been getting worse recently.

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I'm going to wait until I've seen the Neurologist at the end of October and seen my GP again along with the Gastroentorologist before I decide whether to make a claim for ESA because I need to know what is causing my issues and whether it's going to affect me being able to work because my health has been getting worse recently.

 

Fair enough, but do note that if you claim ESA and later decide that you are in fact fit for work, there's nothing to stop you going back to JSA. You don't need to find out all of the details before you make an ESA claim.


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I'm not and I am sorry if you think that.

But it is very important to concentrate on the descriptors and points for both PIP and ESA than it is to gather evidence supporting the fact that you believe you are too ill to work or are severely disabled.

 

Your illness/disability is secondary to proving which descriptor you are applying under and what points you are trying to obtain.

 

I agree with what you say.

 

Just underlines that this government dont give two hoots about ill n disabled people. YOU MUST meet the descriptors and approach the ESA 50 form from that angle or although it might be unjust you fail ESA.

 

We have all heard the horror storys of those dying after failing to get into the ESA group.

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I recently moved in with my partner and I did a change of circumstances informing the DWP that I now live with my partner as of a couple of weeks ago instead of my parents and my partner works 23 hours a week and earns around £800 a month, she was working 30 hours a week but they went down to 23 at the beginning of September and when doing this change of circumstances I was informed that I could still claim Jobseekers as my partner only works 23 hours and that because we don't have £16,000 in savings.

 

However, was informed today that supposedly my partner earns "ENOUGH" money for us both to live on.

 

We live in rented accommodation, the rent is £500 a month alone, my partner also has to pay out between £130-150 a month in travel expenses as she works 30 miles away, plus with all other bills it's way over £1,100 a month.

 

What do we do now? I was considering applying for ESA in the near future because I no longer feel fit enough to work but they will probably refuse that on the same ground?!

 

When my partner was living alone, she was receiving over £30 a week in Housing Benefit, will they pay more now since her hours are lower and seeing as I am now living with her and not receiving any income?

 

Is there any other benefits or hardship payments I can claim? We are now both extremely worried how we are going to manage.

Edited by thecookiemonster

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Unfortunately they dont take into account living costs such as actually getting to work. Had the same issue when my partner became unemployed, didn't get a penny and i only work 20hrs a week at minimum wage. Try claiming for working tax credit. CAB are quite good at telling you what you can claim for.

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Thanks for your reply, well it's not looking good now at all, don't know how we're going to survive, they keep saying work pays but does it? If my partner can no longer afford to travel to work because of this then she could have to give up her job that she has been in for 3 years.

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Have you tried applying for housing benefit / council tax support?

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When my partner was living alone and working 30 hours a week she was receiving just over £30 a week in Housing Benefit plus a little from Council Tax benefit, we wrote to the council as soon as I moved in informing them that I now live here and that my partners hours have dropped to 23 a week, they have asked for additional information which we can provide once my partner gets her wage slip next week stating she works 23 hours a week as they want Septembers and Octobers wage slips from my partner and she doesn't receive wage slips until the end of the month.

 

I'm hoping they are going to pay a lot more than they were when my partner was living on her own and working 30 hours a week.

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If there are 2 of you now & her earnings have gone down & you are earning nothing, then you would have thought you would both get more housing benefit?

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I find it very misleading and the DWP should be sued for misrepresentation, it clearly says on the http://www.gov.uk website:-

 

3. Eligibility

To get Jobseeker’s Allowance (JSA) you must:

 

be 18 or over but below State Pension age - there are some exceptions if you’re 16 or 17

not be in full-time education

be in England, Scotland or Wales

be able and available for work

be actively seeking work

work on average less than 16 hours a week

go to a JSA interview

Also, to get income-based JSA you (and your partner if you have one):

 

must usually work less than 24 hours a week (on average)

must have £16,000 or less in savings

 

So where does it say i am not eligible for Income Based JSA if my partner works 23 hours per week and earns £11,500 a year?

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If there are 2 of you now & her earnings have gone down & you are earning nothing, then you would have thought you would both get more housing benefit?

 

Hoepfully we will get a lot more but I won't be holding my breath.

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Also I did 4 months temp work from November 2012 to February 2013 so why didn't they switch me to contributions based JSA? As surely I'm entitled to that for a few months?

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