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Rising Damp Myth? I need help with Damp Proofing Survey

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We are first time buyers and had a survey undertaken by aPCA registered surveyor, now we have a mortgage with £4500 retention, requiringDamp Proofing our walls.

 

I have done some research and found various sites saying there’sno such thing as rising damp! But I’ve still got to spend £4500 on treatments?

 

Any help guys?

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Older properties were built without a damproof course and the water in the ground can creep up the bricks and soak into them, this will rise up to the brick layer above and so on, so there is such a thing as rising damp.

 

You will notice it mainly in areas that don't get a lot of air ie behind settees or other furniture up against an outside wall.

 

If you have wooden floors with a space underneath you will have 'airbricks' to allow air to circulate between the floor and the ground. You should make sure those airbricks are well clear of the ground so that rainwater cannot run through them into the void beneath the floor.

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As suggested, check air bricks first, a builder can replace them in less than half a day. Chemical damp proofing is not that expensive so the £4.5k retention seems a bit steep. Check the type of mortar used in construction and see if it has been repointed at ground level. if it has then it may need chasing out and redoing to get a better result as OPC on top of lime mortar traps water in. Look for overflowing gutters, downpipes, overflows etc that would pour a large volume of water onto the ground which would cause localised damp. Again, cheap to remedy if that is the problem.

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Older properties were built without a damproof course and the water in the ground can creep up the bricks and soak into them, this will rise up to the brick layer above and so on, so there is such a thing as rising damp.

 

You will notice it mainly in areas that don't get a lot of air ie behind settees or other furniture up against an outside wall.

 

If you have wooden floors with a space underneath you will have 'airbricks' to allow air to circulate between the floor and the ground. You should make sure those airbricks are well clear of the ground so that rainwater cannot run through them into the void beneath the floor.

 

Yes, I had to have this done on a previous property.


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£4500 is a lot of money to us, my question for the expertsis:

 

1.0 Am I being ripped off by the damp company.

 

2.0 Should I have to have the work done?

 

We will also need to redecorate and I have had a quote for£1500.

 

But if the whole things a con I’m wasting my money, thinkingof getting an independent survey after seeing these posting:

Heritage House-Fraud of Rising Damp

Jeff Howell-Rising Damp Myth

 

Architects Journal- RICS says theres no such thing as rising damp

 

 

My wife is virtually in tears we are first time buyers andsaved 5 years for the deposit.

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The only thing we could suggest is that you contact the Damp Proofing Association as they may be able to advise you.


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3: Banking Conduct of Business Regulations - The Hidden Rules

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Advice & opinions given by citizenb are personal, are not endorsed by Consumer Action Group or Bank Action Group, and are offered informally, without prejudice & without liability. Your decisions and actions are your own, and should you be in any doubt, you are advised to seek the opinion of a qualified professional.

 

PLEASE DO NOT ASK ME TO GIVE ADVICE BY PM - IF YOU PROVIDE A LINK TO YOUR THREAD THEN I WILL BE HAPPY TO OFFER ADVICE THERE:D

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If this is a house you are buying, what is the seller doing about this problem ? The sale price was agreed before the damp problem was found, so you should speak to your Solicitor about this issue. Most Solicitors who do conveyancing on a regular basis will come across these issues and will know what to do. They may suggest that the seller obtains independent reports into the problem.


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I did not expain, we now own the house, but i keep seeing blogs about There no such thing as rising damp and £4.5k is a lot of money.

 

Any experts on here?

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I did not expain, we now own the house, but i keep seeing blogs about There no such thing as rising damp and £4.5k is a lot of money.

 

Any experts on here?

 

Sadly no, if there had of been, I would have pointed them to your thread. I have already made a suggestion that you contact the Damp Proofing Association, they should be able to advise you.


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Uploading documents to CAG ** Instructions **

 

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1: Making a PPI claim ? - Q & A's and spreadsheets for single premium policy -

HERE

2: Take back control of your finances -

Debt Diaries

3: Feel Bullied by Creditors or Debt Collectors?

Read Here

4: Staying Calm About Debt

Read Here

5: Forum rules - These have been updated -

Please Read

 

 

BCOBS

 

2: Does your Bank play fair - You can force your Bank to play Fair with you

3: Banking Conduct of Business Regulations - The Hidden Rules

4: BCOBS and Unfair Treatment - Common Examples of Banks Behaving Badly

5: Fair Treatment for Credit Card Holders and Borrowers - COBS

 

 

 

Advice & opinions given by citizenb are personal, are not endorsed by Consumer Action Group or Bank Action Group, and are offered informally, without prejudice & without liability. Your decisions and actions are your own, and should you be in any doubt, you are advised to seek the opinion of a qualified professional.

 

PLEASE DO NOT ASK ME TO GIVE ADVICE BY PM - IF YOU PROVIDE A LINK TO YOUR THREAD THEN I WILL BE HAPPY TO OFFER ADVICE THERE:D

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I called the Damp Proofing Association and they told me thesurveyor who undertook the Damp Survey was not a qualified person and not amember, I’m getting a proper survey done by one of their experts so we aregetting there now.

I cannot thank you enough great advice.

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