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Hi all,

It has come as a major surprise to me that O2 are being incredibly unhelpful in applying either a credit limit to my phone (in case of unauthorized use if stolen), or applying an international call barr ( the most likely use if stolen).

 

Am i being unnecessarily harsh/stupid in requesting same or are they simply looking to profiteer in the face of possible misfortune?

 

Has any body managed to get this done with O2? And/or found an inventive work around?

 

Thanks

 

Jaba

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Hi

Yes mobile with O2.

 

All i have tried thus far is trying to persuade the call centre guys that this is somethings the network is well able to do IF they have the intention of doing so?....... but they are not interested.

I am also aware of a hack using some software, but that requires a jailbreak which i dont want to do at this stage.

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There's not a lot of point in arguing with the CC staff that O2's company policy is wrong - they don't have the power to change that policy.

 

Saying that, I seem to recall from my own (mercifully brief) days as an O2 CSA in Glasgow that international barring was actually possible, although a credit limit was not.

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If O2 no longer offers international barring, there probably is a workaround somewhere out there, though I suspect that any such workaround could be defeated by a determined thief. There are also anti-theft apps that will lock out the phone, delete stored data and so on and which can be accessed online.

 

You are not liable for any charges incurred after you report the theft to O2.

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If O2 no longer offers international barring, there probably is a workaround somewhere out there, though I suspect that any such workaround could be defeated by a determined thief. There are also anti-theft apps that will lock out the phone, delete stored data and so on and which can be accessed online.

 

You are not liable for any charges incurred after you report the theft to O2.

 

Although it is true that you are only liable for calls until the theft is recorded:

 

1 you do not have your mobile on you, and probably don't have a number for o2 on you.

2 a thief will take a phone with a view to instantly calling international premium rate number that they get some financial benefit to.

 

I would personally, just to put your mind at rest, Write to o2 and ask if they can confirm what measures they can put in place to protect you.

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I would personally, just to put your mind at rest, Write to o2 and ask if they can confirm what measures they can put in place to protect you.

 

An interesting idea and one i might just do to see what liability they may think they have.

 

. I still struggle to understand why so few if any people are complaining about this huge hole in consumer protection !

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Even if you disable & wipe your phone remotely a thief could put the sim into a different phone to use it ...

 

I am equally horrified by the mobile companies policies re credit limit etc. Even with insurance, you have to pay that instead - heads they win unless your insurance provider is a different company & they still cover unauthorised use after theft

 

I can't imagine that there are many customers who are completely happy with their lack of safeguards even against inadvertent own overuse

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Even if you disable & wipe your phone remotely a thief could put the sim into a different phone to use it ...

 

I am equally horrified by the mobile companies policies re credit limit etc. Even with insurance, you have to pay that instead - heads they win unless your insurance provider is a different company & they still cover unauthorised use after theft

 

I can't imagine that there are many customers who are completely happy with their lack of safeguards even against inadvertent own overuse

 

Hint for all, you can pin protect your SIM

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Your phone will have an option to add a pin. All phones do.

If in doubt, contact a qualified insured legal professional (or my wife... she knows EVERYTHING)

 

Or send a cheque or postal order payable to Reclaim the Right Ltd.

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Yep. Usually 2 options. 1 is enable pin for the phone. Other is for the sim. On mine, both are enabled, so i need to enter my pin twice each time it auto locks itself, or i switch it on/off. Both Pins are different. On some smartphones, you can even make the pin a gesture so its pretty much impossible for anyone to crack.

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http://bswan.org/revenue_share_fraud.asp#.UaKSpNK-pcZ

 

November 2012

 

The basic GSMA roaming agreement for example, which is bilaterally agreed between two operators says that the originating operator must pay for all calls originating from his network — whether it is fraud or not.

 

..........

IRSF (International Revenue Share Fraud) is a huge problem that the industry finds difficult to manage. Unless we start getting some localized legislation in countries to stop the money flow, it will continue to be difficult to manage. Stop the money and you stop the problem.

In my view, the operator shouldn’t be paying money when they know that at the end of the payment chain, a percentage of this is going to get into the hands of fraudsters. In my view, this money is the proceeds of crime and payment could constitute money laundering.

 

from the previous head of Fraud Management at the Vodafone Group who left the post a few months ago.

the above article is a must read for anybody who wants to understand how the industry is being allowed to defraud the customers.

and this

http://www.itu.int/ITU-D/finance/work-cost-tariffs/events/tariff-seminars/Geneva-OriginID/pdf/Session5_Maxwell_GSMA_v3.pdf

 

the only protection the customer has would be to dispute the bill and wait for the Network to take you to court. I have not seen a single case where they risked doing this.

Edited by goodwill
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100% agree. As always in the mobile industry all profit is good, but any responsibilities are shirked.

 

IMO Jabamusic is trying a pre-emptive strike here. It would be good to get the view of the networks so let us know how they reply Jabamusic please.

If in doubt, contact a qualified insured legal professional (or my wife... she knows EVERYTHING)

 

Or send a cheque or postal order payable to Reclaim the Right Ltd.

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