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noise1990

What can you do about a rude GP

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My mum is the sweetest lady ever and would never hurt a fly.. the other day she came back home after a doctors appointment and was extremely upset as the GP she had seen was out right rude!

 

She had voiced her worries and problems about her multiple symptoms and the GP barley spoke.... She was talking about some quite personal issues when he interrupted her and said "maybe a blood test will quite you about all these silly problems you've been blabbering on about!"

 

Should a GP be allowed to say stuff like that? is there some way this issue can be addressed? apparently hes always like that but I don't like the thought that he's "poohooing" peoples worries? that might deter people from coming forward with their problems! Not how I think a doctor should behave. I understand its a stressful job and some people might be a bit of a hypercondriact (cant spell that word!) but shouldn't tolerance be a key part of being a GP!

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yes but sometimes they have a bad day, I would suggest hat she sees another GP in he prtactise if there is one or changes GP, a complaint to the practise manager is possible but really wont achieve much as he has done nothing acyually wrong. Although you probably dont want to hear it but is it possible that your mum was waffleing on about various symptoms and the GP was getting a bit frustrated with her? maybe she took his comment abou silly problems he wrong way?


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Hi noise1990. I see you are new to CAG. In so far as it is my place to say so, welcome.

 

I agree with your mother and you. That was 'outright rude' and doctors are NOT entitled to behave like that. (If one spoke to me like that I would put them in their place forthwith and in person, but then I am far from a sweet lady .)

 

Alas, though, all too many doctors do behave like that, all too often - and one reason for that is precisely because it is so difficult for patients (or their families\carers) to get any remotely satisfactory result from a formal complaint.

 

What OUGHT to happen is that a patient complains to the practice in writing, the GP acknowledges the facts, apologises and promises it won't happen again. It may often be the case that in professional consultations the professional consulted needs to keep 'an eye on the clock' and the client\patient focussed on issues that can be addressed within a short space of time - but there are many ways of achieving that and being outright rude isn't one of them.

 

What is likely to happen is that the pracice never acknowledges that the doctor actually spoke those words, the practice manager writes about 'the need to keep patient focussed on important issues for the benefit of all patients with appointments that day' , says that it is 'sorry your mother FELT rushed' (or somehing like that), and assures you that the (experienced) doctor takes his caring responsibilites very seriously and would never mean to give offence to your mother or any other patient.

 

The patient, and relatives\carers, are thus fobbed off with injury added to insult, your mother's card is marked as a a 'difficult patient', and the GP goes on being just as goddarn rude as his inflated little ego pleases.

 

I infer from your account that have conferred with others, and it seems 'he's always like that'. That will be because he has nver been disciplined for his rudeness. If you decide to complain you could, just potentially, do everyone a good service: a RUDE doctor is a CLINICALLY INCOMPETENT doctor. But be prepared for a long and frustrating stuggle.

 

Should you decide to complain, here's some stuff from the General Medical Council's document 'Good Medical Practice' which lays down standards which all doctors must meet (emphasis mine):-

 

........................

 

All doctors are required to treat patients 'politely and considerately'.

 

Thisis a fundamental professional obligation listed on the front page of the document.

 

Illustrations of this overriding obligation are given within the numbered paragraphs pf the booklet itself. E.g:-

 

1 Patients need good doctors. Good doctors make the care of their patients their first concern: they are competent, keep their knowledge and skillsup to date. establish and maintain good relationships with patients andcolleagues, are honest and trustworthy, and act with integrityand within the law.

 

 

2 Good doctors work in partnership with patients and respect their rights to privacyand dignity. They treat each patient as an individual.Theydo theirbest to make sure all patients receive good care and treatment that willsupport them to live as well as possible, whatever their illness ordisability.

 

31 You must listen to patients, take account of their views, and respond honestly to their questions.

 

(Extracts from:-

 

http://www.gmc-uk.org/GMP_2013.pdf_51447599.pdf)

 

............................................

 

In any event, best of luck, and don't let 'em grind you down.

Edited by nolegion

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GP are not doctors any more and therefore they are not on the patients' side. They are part NHS secretaries and part pharmaceutical reps.


"Ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for Poundland"

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:nolegion:

 

'What is likely to happen ...... the (experienced) doctor takes his caring responsibilities very seriously ......'

 

Taken straight from the Shatos staff guidance on how to deal with pesky claimants:?: Either that or you've seen one too many patronising responses from, in no particular order;

 

Hospital and practice managers.

Shatos.

Work n Pensions, despite their stint on the naughty step.

 

:wave: Margaret.

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:noise1990:

 

I'm with you n your Mum on this one. She deserves better from a professional who has a duty of care towards her.

 

Should you have the time and energy for a formal complaint this forum's a mine of useful info.

 

:hug: for your Mum, Margaret.

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yes but sometimes they have a bad day, I would suggest hat she sees another GP in he prtactise if there is one or changes GP, a complaint to the practise manager is possible but really wont achieve much as he has done nothing acyually wrong. Although you probably dont want to hear it but is it possible that your mum was waffleing on about various symptoms and the GP was getting a bit frustrated with her? maybe she took his comment abou silly problems he wrong way?

 

Having a bad day is not an excuse to dismiss someones fears about their health! He has done something wrong he has been unproffessional and treated the patient worrying about her health in a dismissive and rude way. Putting the blame on the patient is wrong, telling the OP it's possible his mother was waffelling on about various sypmtoms with no evidence to suggest she was is also wrong, saying maybe she took his comments the wrong way too is wrong. Laying the problem on the patient when that is her only place to seek help when she is unwell is shocking.

All in all it sounds like the doctor treated the patient in a rude and unproffessional way regardless of whether he was having a bad day he should perhaps learn to leave his problems at home and should be reported. Maybe in future he will keep his bad manners in check, if he can't he can move on to a job that doesn't require him to talk to the public if he finds it hard work.

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As the Op wasn't with his mother and cannot say exactly what was said I put the word in POSSIBLY and she may have taken his comments the wrong way, again note the word MAY. Got to say Drs are human and they can have a bad day, being a Dr dosent make them any different from the rest of us. I did also suggest that the OPs mother changes her GP and I didn't lay the problem on the patient, again we were not there we don't know what was said and how it was said. And a complaint to the practise manager wont really achieve a great deal unless it is one of a number of similar complaints and then it might


If I have been of any help, please click on my star and let me know, thank you.

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Hi Noise,

 

Welcome to CAG.

 

Regardless whether or not the GP was having a 'bad day' every patient deserves to be treated right.

 

As already suggested I would write a letter of complaint to the Practice Manager (or call and speak to them to ask about their complaints procedure). It is worth making a complaint, AND it will get dealt with.

When I made a complaint about a GP who acted very similar toward my dad, the practice manager told me others had made the same complaint, and the GP was dealt with. So it may not be just your mum who has been unfortunate enough to deal with this ignoramus, and her complaint might be the one the practice needs to get rid of a rude and unprofessional doctor. After all, if the GP does this regularly it wont be long before he dismisses a serious illness and causes massive problems for the surgery.

 

Good luck with it. I hope your mum's okay

 

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