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Opinions Please,just read an article where Dame Ann Begg Labour MP states that the state pension is a Benefit,this same statement has been made numerous times before by various people.It does raise the question if this is the case and it is a Benefit,why can it be taxed,it must be the only benefit that can be taxed.

 

Regards FS

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It's not the only benefit that counts as taxable income. ESA©, Incapacity Benefit and all types of JSA are also taxable.

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The idea that all politicians lie is music to the ears of the most egregious liars.

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You beat me to it, antone. This is from the HMRC website.

 

taxable benefits e.g. Jobseeker’s Allowance, Carer’s Allowance, most Incapacity Benefit and contributions based Education and Support Allowance (but income based ESA is not taxable)

 

HB

Illegitimi non carborundum

 

 

 

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Many thanks to both of you for your replies,I stand corrected,and will have a look at HMRC site,as I started the thread without checking HMRC first

 

Regards FS

 

I should hope that it is right! I include my ESA payments in my tax return every year when the time comes to cough up the dough!

 

I actually pay 20% of my ESA back to the government every year - all £1092 of it and more besides.

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Hi dogboneday I checked HMRC site,ESA is one of a number of Benefits that tax is taken from.

 

I asked the question after reading an article by Dame Ann Begg MP who stated the State Pension was a Benefit,which caused a number of heavy comments like" I paid for my Pension through NI for 44 years,so its not a benefit" this I can understand.........,I picked it up because I pay tax on my state pension and I am not happy after paying NI for 48 years which I think is the maximum and worked for 56years,which included 12 years Military Service and still paying Income Tax to the UK Government.

 

FS

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Hi dogboneday I checked HMRC site,ESA is one of a number of Benefits that tax is taken from.

 

I asked the question after reading an article by Dame Ann Begg MP who stated the State Pension was a Benefit,which caused a number of heavy comments like" I paid for my Pension through NI for 44 years,so its not a benefit" this I can understand.........,I picked it up because I pay tax on my state pension and I am not happy after paying NI for 48 years which I think is the maximum and worked for 56years,which included 12 years Military Service and still paying Income Tax to the UK Government.

 

FS

 

The State Retirement Pension (SRP) is indeed a "benefit" in the same sense that contributory ESA and JSA are "benefits". They are all based on NI conts made while you worked. Of course, I don't think "benefit" should be considered a poisonous word.

 

Now I don't for a moment suggest that people who have worked hard all their lives should be denied a living pension when they retire, and in fact, one of the most shocking (to me) aspects of this whole phoney issue is that it pits the retired against the jobless and the sick.

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The idea that all politicians lie is music to the ears of the most egregious liars.

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The State Retirement Pension (SRP) is indeed a "benefit" in the same sense that contributory ESA and JSA are "benefits". They are all based on NI conts made while you worked. Of course, I don't think "benefit" should be considered a poisonous word.

 

Now I don't for a moment suggest that people who have worked hard all their lives should be denied a living pension when they retire, and in fact, one of the most shocking (to me) aspects of this whole phoney issue is that it pits the retired against the jobless and the sick.

 

Unfortunately the term 'benefits' is a 'dirty' word. It is used to describe welfare handouts to those that are feckless, work shy, lazy and parasites. I, like you, agree that the retired are now being dragged into this category. How many times have I heard people say that the retired are a 'drain on society' and that they 'produce nothing and should be made to work longer'.

 

It is sad and it's not that long ago that the retired were respected, congratulated and thanked for the contribution that they have made to society over their working lives.

 

When I say that I have retired, although only a young 64, I am greeted with distaste and told to 'get a job'!

 

Whether I can work or choose not to is my choice, but it is made plainly clear to me that if I want to opt out of the rat race, I can, provided that I don't expect the rest of society to pay for my lifestyle choice.

 

Some have gone further to suggest that those that don't contribute to society due to age or disability should be offered the choice of a 'free funeral if you go now!' And that was said during a serious conversation.

 

Yes the retired, the so called sick and the unemployed are now classed as one and the same.

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Hi dogboneday I checked HMRC site,ESA is one of a number of Benefits that tax is taken from.

 

I asked the question after reading an article by Dame Ann Begg MP who stated the State Pension was a Benefit,which caused a number of heavy comments like" I paid for my Pension through NI for 44 years,so its not a benefit" this I can understand.........,I picked it up because I pay tax on my state pension and I am not happy after paying NI for 48 years which I think is the maximum and worked for 56years,which included 12 years Military Service and still paying Income Tax to the UK Government.

 

FS

 

FS,

 

This has been the case for a long time. When my mother became unwell enough that we were providing care for her in excess of 35 hours a week, I was unable to claim Carers Allowance because I worked too many hours and earned too much a month to qualify, we looked into my dad putting in a claim instead as he took over the carer role while I was at work only to be told he didn't qualify due to already being in receipt of a conflicting benefit - as he received no benefits for himself we queried this statement and were told that, as he was over 65 and received a state pension, he was receiving all the allowable benefit he could claim!!

 

More than 13 years later we are still in the same situation of providing care, though now, I am caring for both my parents due to advancing age and increased frailty!!!

 

Feebee_71

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FS,

 

This has been the case for a long time. When my mother became unwell enough that we were providing care for her in excess of 35 hours a week, I was unable to claim Carers Allowance because I worked too many hours and earned too much a month to qualify, we looked into my dad putting in a claim instead as he took over the carer role while I was at work only to be told he didn't qualify due to already being in receipt of a conflicting benefit - as he received no benefits for himself we queried this statement and were told that, as he was over 65 and received a state pension, he was receiving all the allowable benefit he could claim!!

 

More than 13 years later we are still in the same situation of providing care, though now, I am caring for both my parents due to advancing age and increased frailty!!!

 

Feebee_71

 

We too have that particular problem. My wife is paid her SRP so cannot receive Carers Allowance for me and I receive Contributory ESA so cannot receive Carers Allowance for her.

 

It's called 'Caring on the cheap' as far as the government are concened!

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We too have that particular problem. My wife is paid her SRP so cannot receive Carers Allowance for me and I receive Contributory ESA so cannot receive Carers Allowance for her.

 

It's called 'Caring on the cheap' as far as the government are concened!

 

I did back in 2010! I had just turned 60 in the June 2009 and was fully employed (although had been on the sick for the prevoius 6 months) on a salary of £28500 a year. In November I went into the local jobcentre to question what benefits could I get if I retired. They handed me a whole load of booklets and said that I would lose a lot of money by giving up work.

 

Reading through them it became fairly apparent that sickness/disability was the way to go. Having used up my SSP, I started to get my full pension, claimed contribution based ESA and was put in the Support Group for 3 years. Then I applied and had my DLA (LRM) upped to HRM & MRC indefinitely. I then had my wife apply for Attendance Allowance (she had just turned 65) with the help of social services. She was awarded the day and night time rate.

My wife and I then claimed Carers Allowance for each other.

 

Pension Credit came next - with all of the added premiums our total weekly income came to £380 then that went up in 2011 to £400 a week. Plus another £175 a week of DLA and AA.

 

We pay no Council Tax and we also have £68 a week paid to the bank for our mortgage.

 

All in all our income was worth about £650 a week. Whereas my wage was about £475 a week!!!

 

I wrote to the Daily Mail showing them how generous the system was but they refused to print it making a comment in an email to the effect that pensioners are one group of society that require additional help!!

 

If you are going to be a successful liar, you had better improve your memory.

  • Haha 1

 

Corruptissima re publica plurimae leges

 

Being poor is like being a Pelican. No matter where you look, all you see is a large bill.

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If you are going to be a successful liar, you had better improve your memory.

 

i do wish that you would read exactly what I say sometimes instead of trying to read into something that isn't there!

 

Of course we claimed Carers Allowance for each other. Claiming it doesn't actually mean that you will get it in terms of hard cash!

 

We don't physically receive the Carers Allowance for the reasons I have said, but we each do get a premium in the Pension Credit calculation.

 

Does that make sense to you?

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Ok, I'm as sceptical about this guy as anyone, but it IS true that you claim carers allowance in order to not get paid CA, but be entitled to underlying entitlement for the carer's premium on pension credit.

We hang the petty thieves and appoint the great ones to public office ~ Aesop

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That was my understanding; but it appears that dogboneday seems to implying something else.

 

No I don't! Estellyn has got it spot on!

 

It was the underlying entitlement that we wanted to increase the appropriate amount for Pension Credit by £65.20 a week.

 

What do you think I was implying? My posting was very clear unless you are osdset in which case they don't seem to understand anything other than constantly watching gardening programmes on the TV.

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You clearly stated we claimed carers allowance for each other.

 

 

Am I losing the plot here?

 

We (my wife and I) claimed (by each completing a claim form) for each other (she claimed for me and I claimed for her)

 

Once the claims were accepted we were each given underlying entitlement for Carers Allowance.

 

Now tell me in simple English what part of that statement do you not understand? Gee it's like being in a classroom of 5 year olds

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What do you think I was implying? My posting was very clear unless you are osdset in which case they don't seem to understand anything other than constantly watching gardening programmes on the TV.

 

Gardening! Perish the thought my shovels are for a different kind of digging, the offer to lend you one still stands, perhaps you could unearth a bone or two.

 

Corruptissima re publica plurimae leges

 

Being poor is like being a Pelican. No matter where you look, all you see is a large bill.

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And Della2 and Hensteeth and yawn yawn yawn, and the old bone gives a homeless woman a snog on the cheek at the back of a railway station and money to last her a week. Old Flo must not be giving him much attention, aw bless her cotton socks ........

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Am I losing the plot here?

 

We (my wife and I) claimed (by each completing a claim form) for each other (she claimed for me and I claimed for her)

 

Once the claims were accepted we were each given underlying entitlement for Carers Allowance.

 

Now tell me in simple English what part of that statement do you not understand? Gee it's like being in a classroom of 5 year olds

 

Hey my mates got a digger, he will dig you a hole any size you want for fifty quid and a cup of tea.

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