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Does anyone have an opinion on this "Bed in a Shed" scheme backed by Brighton Council?

 

Apparently they gave the goahead for shipping containers to be used to house the homeless and dispossessed.

 

All they need then is the barbed wire and the watchtowers and there you have it, concentration camps.

 

Seems that in some places landlords are erecting sheds on any spare land they have and charging from £300 to £500 per month to house people.

 

Cameron is presently over in India inviting all and sundry to move to England. He's obviously trying his best to change England so they'll feel right at home.

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Those shipping container homes are amazing - they're cheap, sustainable and low maintenance and very quick to build. There's quite a large development of them in Holland. Also, Etat Hotels are built using shipping containers.

 

I'm the last person to pat the current administration on the back, but I think Brighton deserve praise for thinking out of the box on this.

"Then they came for me--and there was no one left to speak for me". Martin Niemöller

 

"A vital ingredient of success is not knowing that what you're attempting can't be done. A person ignorant of the possibility of failure can be a half-brick in the path of the bicycle of history". - Terry Pratchett

 

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I was in Brighton in January and was very very very shocked at the poverty and depravation there. A lot of homeless, obvious drug addiction, cash4loans and credit unions, it was filthy too. They obviously have a much higher proportion of homeless and drug addicted there I would say.

 

I hope the aim is to house warmly and not get them out of sight. Something needs to happen that's for sure. More support to turn lives around would be good.

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http://www.24dash.com/news/housing/2013-02-06-Shipping-containers-to-solve-Brighton-s-housing-crisis

 

the designs dont look too bad, and definitely an improvement on sleeping rough on the streets

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I was in Brighton in January and was very very very shocked at the poverty and depravation there. A lot of homeless, obvious drug addiction, cash4loans and credit unions, it was filthy too. They obviously have a much higher proportion of homeless and drug addicted there I would say.

 

I hope the aim is to house warmly and not get them out of sight. Something needs to happen that's for sure. More support to turn lives around would be good.

 

What's wrong with credit unions ?

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ha ha,like that,thinking out of the box!

 

Dammit, I'm not usually funny when I actually try! D'oh. :razz:

 

I was in Brighton in January and was very very very shocked at the poverty and depravation there. A lot of homeless, obvious drug addiction, cash4loans and credit unions, it was filthy too. They obviously have a much higher proportion of homeless and drug addicted there I would say.

 

I hope the aim is to house warmly and not get them out of sight. Something needs to happen that's for sure. More support to turn lives around would be good.

 

I lived there for 6 months about 16 years ago and although back then, the homeless were no more apparent than in any other large town/city I've lived in, the visible evidence of (hard) drug use was really shocking at times.

 

I've just read id6052's link, and I have to say that I'm a bit disappointed that they're only looking for this to be a temporary solution. They're using containers as permanent housing elsewhere really successfully - there's even a container complex in the Docklands. If I was single, I'd be happy to live in one of the container studios because I think they're brilliant, and really well thought out. The type that I've seen in Holland use the doors of the container to create a balcony, which I thought was a great touch. The only thing I'm not keen on is that the developers seem hell bent on painting the bliddy things in primary colours, which tends to make them look like they've dropped in from Tellytubby land.

"Then they came for me--and there was no one left to speak for me". Martin Niemöller

 

"A vital ingredient of success is not knowing that what you're attempting can't be done. A person ignorant of the possibility of failure can be a half-brick in the path of the bicycle of history". - Terry Pratchett

 

If I've been helpful, please click my star. :oops:

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http://www.24dash.com/news/housing/2013-02-06-Shipping-containers-to-solve-Brighton-s-housing-crisis

 

the designs dont look too bad, and definitely an improvement on sleeping rough on the streets

 

Looks to be a vast improvement on some of the bedsits (or do they call it 'shared accomodation' now) I lived in when I was younger.

We hang the petty thieves and appoint the great ones to public office ~ Aesop

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If those sheds were so great the poor would not have a look-in. The well to do and the speculators, who have got their beady eyes on the homes of the dispossessed, would be scooping them up.

 

Not seeing the impending advent of Kristallnacht here? The victims of those days were also led to beleive and encouraged to inform others how much better off they would be and how lucky they were. When they became too ill or old to work for nothing there was a solution for that too, the final solution. Chemical coshing and allowed to vegitate in privately run "care homes" is much more humane.

 

ATOS, are they not an offshoot of Siemens? Siemens, is it not a German company who built their factories in or near the camps? What did they produce, medication, poisons, chemicals and gases, gas chambers and the ovens, among other things? Old habits die hard?

 

Anyway let's make sure that nothing remains to offend the eyes or disturb the sensitivities of the good people of Brighton. You'll want your poor shipped up north I expect? Perhaps they could be shipped off bag and baggage to the former colonies?

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Aren't there any caves around anymore? All this mollycoddling will end in tears.

 

And a nice cave with a couple of energysaver bulbs will create a warm moody ambience with no need to go out and kill animals for their blubber to run the oil lamps. New technology combined with old. What more do people want in this day and age!

 

Shipping containers, pffff! Pure luxury provided by us taxpayers.

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its not an aweful idea actually, better than been on the streets and probably also better than grotty b&b's shared with drug addicts etc. Of course this is assuming these give people personal space so 1 person per container, and also adequate protection against weather.

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If those sheds were so great the poor would not have a look-in. The well to do and the speculators, who have got their beady eyes on the homes of the dispossessed, would be scooping them up.

 

Not seeing the impending advent of Kristallnacht here? The victims of those days were also led to beleive and encouraged to inform others how much better off they would be and how lucky they were. When they became too ill or old to work for nothing there was a solution for that too, the final solution. Chemical coshing and allowed to vegitate in privately run "care homes" is much more humane.

 

ATOS, are they not an offshoot of Siemens? Siemens, is it not a German company who built their factories in or near the camps? What did they produce, medication, poisons, chemicals and gases, gas chambers and the ovens, among other things? Old habits die hard?

 

Anyway let's make sure that nothing remains to offend the eyes or disturb the sensitivities of the good people of Brighton. You'll want your poor shipped up north I expect? Perhaps they could be shipped off bag and baggage to the former colonies?

 

The speculators and and well to do are getting a look in, though. There's a few investment opportunities around at the moment for shipping container halls of residence for students. There's also companies using a stack of these containers to make high spec 'designer eco houses'.

 

I don't want the poor 'shipped off' anywhere - if someone wants to live somewhere like Brighton where it's practically impossible to find decent, low cost housing then they absolutely should be able to do so. They shouldn't have to be relocated to East Jesus, Nowhere by their local council because there's no available accommodation in that area and they certainly shouldn't be sleeping rough or couch surfing if there could be another option.

 

I'm sorry if it comes across like I find poor people distasteful in some way (I bloody hope not, because I am one!), but if we're in a position where for whatever reason housing has become too expensive for a large section of the population, then one way of bringing down the cost is to increase the supply. Container homes are cheap, extremely quick to put together and pretty effective.

 

For what it's worth, I see Kristallnacht in a in a lot of things going on at the minute...just not this thing.

"Then they came for me--and there was no one left to speak for me". Martin Niemöller

 

"A vital ingredient of success is not knowing that what you're attempting can't be done. A person ignorant of the possibility of failure can be a half-brick in the path of the bicycle of history". - Terry Pratchett

 

If I've been helpful, please click my star. :oops:

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There is some relevance to my comments.

 

Last Saturday night outside St Pancras railway station at about a 9.30pm, a young lady (27 i found out later) asked me for some change. She was decently dressed if not in part shabby, clean and spoke very well. We started talking about how she managed. She explained that after the 18 years of her life being in care and foster homes she ran away due to physical abuse from the last foster father. For the next 9 years she has spent them on the streets in London, lately sleeping behind a hotel on the Euston Road. She manages to beg enough to have a shower and wash her clothes a couple of times a week. Her english (she was born in Dublin and had a soft Irish accent) portrayed a good education and she was well versed in Classical music.It was clear to me that she did not take drugs during my close questioning.

 

During the conversation she started to explain what had happened with her foster father - I won't repeat it on here, but I don't blame her for moving out. Tears started to roll down her face apologising for it.

 

I helped her out by giving her enough money to book into a shelter for a week and I apologised to her on behalf of the rest of us for letting her down.

She went on her way after giving me a peck on my cheek and thanking me not for the money but for just listening to her.

 

I have twin daughters aged 32 and I looked at her and thought of them!

 

I'm 63 and I have never seen such emptiness in someone before - In fact I have never really spoken to someone that was homeless before - I still see her face and her voice. I came home and gave both my daughters' a hug the following day and thought to myself how lucky I and they are.

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A lovely story, Cleaver, Bless You

 

Sadly all too familiar in our towns and cities.

 

By the way there is no likelyhood that those sheds are going to be any cheaper for the proposed occupants. The bills will be no less.

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There is some relevance to my comments.

 

Last Saturday night outside St Pancras railway station at about a 9.30pm, a young lady (27 i found out later) asked me for some change. She was decently dressed if not in part shabby, clean and spoke very well. We started talking about how she managed. She explained that after the 18 years of her life being in care and foster homes she ran away due to physical abuse from the last foster father. For the next 9 years she has spent them on the streets in London, lately sleeping behind a hotel on the Euston Road. She manages to beg enough to have a shower and wash her clothes a couple of times a week. Her english (she was born in Dublin and had a soft Irish accent) portrayed a good education and she was well versed in Classical music.It was clear to me that she did not take drugs during my close questioning.

 

During the conversation she started to explain what had happened with her foster father - I won't repeat it on here, but I don't blame her for moving out. Tears started to roll down her face apologising for it.

 

I helped her out by giving her enough money to book into a shelter for a week and I apologised to her on behalf of the rest of us for letting her down.

She went on her way after giving me a peck on my cheek and thanking me not for the money but for just listening to her.

 

I have twin daughters aged 32 and I looked at her and thought of them!

 

I'm 63 and I have never seen such emptiness in someone before - In fact I have never really spoken to someone that was homeless before - I still see her face and her voice. I came home and gave both my daughters' a hug the following day and thought to myself how lucky I and they are.

 

You chat to an awful lot of people, dont know how you have the time to post so many times on here. You chat to people on hospital car parks, chatted to a homeless person got a peck on the cheek and gave her enough money for her stay in a shelter for a week despite your own problems and that of your elderly wife who receive AA, not to mention under another names on this forum you live in a rural area and know everyone in the local pub and who is in receipt of DLA HRM as you inspect their Tax Discs. You are a busy body.

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I think, in theory these are a good idea.

 

But which homeless are they going to rehouse.

 

I unfortunately have been homeless, in the winter for 3 months 6 years ago. Half the people i met would ruin these places. There would be needles and other drug paraphernalia lying around. Empty bottles of cheap alcohol, and they would stink to high heaven. They would be treated like squats. Thats the problem with housing all homeless together.

 

PLUS, will they be continually monitored or would they be left to their own devises.

 

I know, not every homeless person is like that. I for one wasn't, but unfortunately those stereotypes are all too often true. Unless there were strict rules about who would get rehoused, then it won't work.

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You chat to an awful lot of people, dont know how you have the time to post so many times on here. You chat to people on hospital car parks, chatted to a homeless person got a peck on the cheek and gave her enough money for her stay in a shelter for a week despite your own problems and that of your elderly wife who receive AA, not to mention under another names on this forum you live in a rural area and know everyone in the local pub and who is in receipt of DLA HRM as you inspect their Tax Discs. You are a busy body.

 

Not forgetting being the chairperson of the local school's PTA. He must meet all these people waiting outside Asda while Flo his OH goes in to do the shopping as going into Asda or Primark is against his principles. That would be the same Flo who gets higher rate attendance allowance because she needs 24/7 care and supervision, but drives Andy to his ATOS assessments.

:lol::lol::lol:

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You chat to an awful lot of people, dont know how you have the time to post so many times on here. You chat to people on hospital car parks, chatted to a homeless person got a peck on the cheek and gave her enough money for her stay in a shelter for a week despite your own problems and that of your elderly wife who receive AA, not to mention under another names on this forum you live in a rural area and know everyone in the local pub and who is in receipt of DLA HRM as you inspect their Tax Discs. You are a busy body.

 

Yes all correct apart from living in a rural area - I live on the outskirts of a large city!!!

I don't drink or go to any pub!!!

And I don't go round checking tax discs!!

Where you get that load of bunkum from I don't know.

 

Yes, I can ill afford to give money away, but surely there comes a time when you feel that you have to do something. Are you that heartless?

 

That chance meeting has made me think differently about the homeless. Up until then I would go out of my way to ignore them even refuse them a cigarette. I saw them all as alcoholics and druggies. Now I realise that there are some that reallly do deserve our help. For the sake of what cash I had in my pocket, I have helped a young vulnerable girl/woman to have hot food, hot showers and a bed for a week. I just hope that somewhere out there there are others that will be just as generous next week towards her.

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Not forgetting being the chairperson of the local school's PTA. He must meet all these people waiting outside Asda while Flo his OH goes in to do the shopping as going into Asda or Primark is against his principles. That would be the same Flo who gets higher rate attendance allowance because she needs 24/7 care and supervision, but drives Andy to his ATOS assessments.

:lol::lol::lol:

 

I remember Andy and Flo, the lovely couple who row and argue with their GP and get struck off, then wonder why.

Then Flo has an appointment to see her consultant without the support of Andy (probably because he's so opinionated he's been banned from the hospital) and poor dear forgets to mention a relevant fact. Andy gets on his high horse (Black Beauty) and demands the consultant to write a supporting letter for Flo. Consultant tells Andy to fox trot oscar.

Then poor elderly Flo drives Andy with his heaving 40 page wad of evidence tucked under his arm, the very arm he uses for his walking stick to his WCA and slams it on the desk and demands it be read by the Atos examiner - yeah right. No wonder Flo needs 24/7 care with him as her other half, bless her cotton socks - how does he make it all up? He's even had a naughty peck on the cheek, wonder if Flo knows about that? :-D:-D:-D

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