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what help for my grandparents ..if any?


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Hi

 

At present my grandparents receive their pension but I think they may be eligible for some assistance in the form of support or disability/attendance allowance? Can someone shed some light for me please.

 

My Papa is 85, my gran 75, for the last 12 months my papas physical and mental well being has deteriorated. He is becoming increasingly forgetful which puts them both at risk at times. He has taken a few knocks lately, falling down the stairs, out the bathetc and increasingly my gran is becoming more of a carer. Clearly this is problematic as although they are coping with our help and are adamant they need no help this situation is not good for either of them.....hes 3 x the size of her so a helping hand into the bath could result with them both in a heap!!!

 

Are they eligible for any assistance? If so please help and where do i start

 

 

Thanks

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Hi ring age concern they should send someone around to help with the forms and try to claim attendance allowance for them both, perhaps social services also for an assessment of their needs.

 

I am in the middle of the same thing for my mum. AgeUK came round and helped us fill in the claim form for Attendance Allowance but it was refused. The DWP have said that mum could use aids and adaptions that are readily available and that using those aids and adaptions together with mum doing things in her own time and in her own way, she would not require help during the day amounting to more than 1 hour in total.

 

So that was that.

 

I have had to get social services involved and a 'care manager' called Zoe was appointed last Wednesday so we will have to see what they come up with - not a lot I would imagine given the cutbacks - they are now only able to help those that fall into the 'critical' zone.

 

In addition, mum is being assessed by the Social Worker attached to the CMHT this Friday down at the hospital as she is also having difficulties in trying to care for dad.

 

I don't personally expect anything to change really, and that they will be told that old age brings on these problems and we have to cope the best we can.

 

Maybe Social Services would help the OP - I don't honestly know - I have no faith in them to be honest.

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Hi I think the trick is to get as much evidence as possible and keep trying I helped 2 people fill in forms and they got the allowance on the second atempt. Don't know if the cut backs are making things harder. Pension credits are good as you get automatic exemption from council tax, but they want to know about savings so think its means tested.

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Hi I think the trick is to get as much evidence as possible and keep trying I helped 2 people fill in forms and they got the allowance on the second atempt. Don't know if the cut backs are making things harder. Pension credits are good as you get automatic exemption from council tax, but they want to know about savings so think its means tested.

 

Yes I agree with you entirely and that is what the OP should be doing.

 

However having evidence of an illness or evidence of treatment or medication means zilch in respect of a claim for Attendance Allowance.

 

The only evidence that will move the mountain of disbelief (aka DWP) is that that describes and confirms what the needs are of the person. This does not include any relating to day to day chores, cooking, cleaning, shopping etc. These needs must be personal specific (self caring), provable, regular throughout the day/night, and exist for a reasonable period of time.

 

The DWP will assume that the person has access to all manner of aids and adaptions that could reduce/remove the needs.

 

So it's not the question of what the illness/condition is, it's how it affects the person concerned.

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Phone Pension Services & ask for a home visit for both your Grandparents.

 

I've used Pensions visits three times for elderly relatives & have always found them excellent. They've completed AA & PC forms & both benefits were awarded on all occasions.

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Phone Pension Services & ask for a home visit for both your Grandparents.

 

I've used Pensions visits three times for elderly relatives & have always found them excellent. They've completed AA & PC forms & both benefits were awarded on all occasions.

 

There is good and bad in all walks of life.

 

I too was offered by the DWP for someone from the visiting team of the Pension Service to come out to help with the completion of the AA claim form for mum.

 

After a lot of thought, I decided that someone independent would be better placed to give that help.

I felt that it was like asking the hangman if I could help by putting the noose over my head instead of him.

 

I asked AgeUK, which turned out to be a farce, the experienced Welfare Rights lady sent a trainee who didn't have a clue what the criteria was for AA!! She just couldn't grasp the idea that any of the needs claimed for had to be tempered by what aids and adaptions were or could be available.

She attempted to put down that mum had difficulties standing for more than a few minutes in one spot, I had to point out to her that 'perching stools' could be used so that there was no point in mentioning that particular problem.

 

Suffice it to say the claim was refused.

 

Maybe the Pension Service visiting team could have done better, I don't know, but for me they were too close to the DWP to offer any real help.

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hi Della you are not having much luck. My late fathers partner got the lower rate DLA for Diveculitis. I suppose its how the assessorrs feel on the day of the decision making, good luck with what ever you decide.

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hi Della you are not having much luck. My late fathers partner got the lower rate DLA for Diveculitis. I suppose its how the assessorrs feel on the day of the decision making, good luck with what ever you decide.

 

Yes it is a whole new world to me is this benefit malarky.

 

I accept that some conditions are variable. As in the case of your late father's partner, the DWP state that:

 

People with asymptomatic diverticular disease found during investigations for other abdominal conditions have no functional restrictions and pursue normal life styles.

Similarly those with intermittent symptoms or episodes of acute diverticulitis, that respond readily to standard treatment are unlikely to have any long term functional restrictions necessitating help from others. The abdominal pain experienced is usually intermittent or episodic and does not affect the function of the lower limbs or restrict walking.

Most people who undergo surgery for complications can be expected to recover after some weeks or months.

Most adults with a temporary or permanent colostomy can be trained to manage it themselves within days or weeks. People with poor manual dexterity, visual impairment, abnormal cognitive function (e.g. dementia) may need colostomy care from another on a long-term basis.

 

and an award of DLA albeit at the lowest rate was made, yet in my mum's case the DWP state:

 

Disabling Effects

People with this level of functional restriction would normally have lower limb joint deformity in at least one joint and restriction of movement in that joint. They would also have pain on weight bearing and joint swelling (except for the hip). Joint pain may wake the person at night even with the use of painkillers. Where the knee is affected it is likely to be unstable and give way leading to falls. They may be on the waiting list for hip or knee replacement surgery.

Mobility

A person with severe restriction would normally need physical assistance from another person in getting around. The use of a walking aid may help prevent falls but it would not improve physical walking ability. The person would not require guidance or supervision outdoors.

Care

A person with severe restriction would normally have joint deformity with pain and restriction of movement. Knee instability is likely to be present and hence an increased risk of falls. However, the use of a stick may help reduce the risk of falls and may also assist in rising after a fall. Such a person would normally need assistance from another person with dressing, bathing and attending to toilet needs. Help is likely to be needed with rising from sitting, getting out of bed, the bath and in using stairs. No supervision or watching over needs would be present.

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After a lot of thought, I decided that someone independent would be better placed to give that help.

I felt that it was like asking the hangman if I could help by putting the noose over my head instead of him.

 

Pension Service Visits are all about making sure pensioners get as much benefit as they are possibly entitled to!

They complete AA & PC forms all the time & know just how to fill them in to maximise benefit.

 

They even chase up the claims & try to inform the pensioner of the award before a letter is issued. I may well be biased but it's just daft not to use them!

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Pension Service Visits are all about making sure pensioners get as much benefit as they are possibly entitled to!

They complete AA & PC forms all the time & know just how to fill them in to maximise benefit.

 

They even chase up the claims & try to inform the pensioner of the award before a letter is issued. I may well be biased but it's just daft not to use them!

 

Wow, you are singing the praises of the DWP!!!

 

I still think that asking the DWP to help maximise the amount of benefit payments just doesn't sit right for me.

 

How can you have one part of the DWP trying to cut back on awards by being ultra strict in making decisions yet you are saying that another section will do everything possible to ensure that people can screw the state for as much as they can get!!!

 

It's no different than asking HMRC to advise on the best possible tax avoidance schemes that could save millions in tax payments, yet the other part turning over every stone to make sure that the government get the maximum tax that they can collect!

 

In my mum's case the visiting pension service (brought in by the Attendance Allowance office in Blackpool) even made an appointment which I cancelled.

 

I simply don't trust the DWP in any of it's guises - experience has taught me that even their 'medically qualified' advisors are so useless that I wouldn't want them anywhere near me if they were the last people available to treat me.

To be honest, since the last farce with AgeUK, I will make it my job in future to fill out the forms - I couldn't make any more of a hash of them that the so called expert Welfare Rights people have in the past.

 

Even DIAL, who I approached last year about my dad and the ridiculous ESA 6 monthly re-assessments just told me that they couldn't do anything as the DWP can decide what to do and when to do it.

Edited by della2
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Guest Another Spartacus

I have to agree with JJ

 

Pensions paid a visit to mum this year, mum lives with me.

 

The lady that completed the forms for mum was very efficient, knowledgable and discussed with us the benefits that she could claim on top of her state pension.

 

She also advised me what additional benefits that I could claim as my employment was about to be terminated through ill health.

 

Mum is now £140 a month better off thanks to pension credits that she could have been claiming for the past 8 YEARS!

 

A S

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Hi

 

Thanks to you all for your advice. Della i'm sorry you have such a struggle on your hands in finding relevant support in our 'big society'.

 

I foolishly thought that given my grandparents age of 85 a lil extra financial aid would be provided without question but what a slap i the face ive had this week for being so foolish.

 

Anyway all advice is greatly appreciated folks.

 

Good luck Della

 

j

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  • 5 weeks later...

Hi

 

Thanks again to all for advice, I surprisingly got a prompt response from DWP regarding Grandads Attendance allowance, they are paying him £80.00 extra a week.

 

Perhaps the fact hes in his 80's helped, I dont know but Good Luck to everyone that has a daily battle with the DWP bafoons.

 

Thanks

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