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I found the best policy was to formally request a new advisor through the comments process. Do not make a complaint but cite incomapatibility of personalities, or you just think you would be more likely to find a job with another advisor. It worked for me.

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its everything really, i get very nervous about interviews and it shows..i mumble and stammer and even though i do loads of preparation to plan how im going to answer questions when it comes to the interview i always mess up. basically i plan what im going say and how im going to answer questions but when it comes to the actual interview it doesn't come out the way i had planned if that makes sense.

 

 

Okay, silly question... What is it about the interview that makes you nervous?

 

In real terms only one of the following things will happen:

  • You get the job
  • You don't get the job

 

So the worst possible outcome is that, for the time being, nothing changes.

 

Use your adviser and their colleagues to your advantage. Get them to run mock interviews and chuck questions at you.

 

Things that have worked for me is to take in a bottle / glass of water, if you’re struggling for an answer then you can take a sip – gives you a few extra seconds to think of something and it’s better than going ‘Errr…’

 

If trying to learn answers word for word just gets confusing, have a plan of action that gives you some headings. If you’re asked about Customer Service for example; instead of coming up with and trying to memorise a huge longwinded answer, have a list of key words or ideas you can use.

 

It might be easier to remember four or five words than fifty.

 

A big hint is to slow down, people always talk to quickly at interviews (interviewers included) and look at the person you’re speaking to – getting your chin up makes it less likely that you’ll mumble or talk to the floor, makes it easier for the other person to understand you and displays a bit of confidence and belief in what it is you’re saying.

 

Like I said before, only you can make yourself feel confident and some of it is a case of ‘Fake it to make it’. The longest you’re likely to be in an interview situation is a few hours, so even if you don’t feel especially confident, you can play at looking it.

 

Let’s be fair, you’re unlikely to ever see the people interviewing you again, even if you do get the job and especially if it’s a big company. Wearing a smile and walking a little taller for a few hours helps put across a positive image and actually will make you feel a bit better too.

My views are my own and are not representative of any organisation. if you've found my post helpful please click on the star below.

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Joe,

 

I honestly can't say that you'll get into a job without some form of interview. Put yourself in the employers' shoes for a moment and ask if you would employ someone without meeting them first?

 

What help do you think would work when it comes to interviews? No-one can make you feel confident, that you have to do for yourself.

 

So it's down to preparation. Your advisor at Ingeus WILL be a good source of help on this but you may not always like what they say.

 

Interviews are structured, contrived and false - simple really... They're designed to put you, and the other applicants, in a stressful situation to see how you react. They're designed to test suitability and knowledge, they're also used to see if you fit in with the existing team dynamics.

 

I’ve never interviewed anyone I didn’t feel was capable of doing the job based on what I’d seen on an application / CV. To do so is a complete waste of everyone’s time, effort and money. So, if you’re being interviewed it’s because the employer WANTS to give you the job, they just need to check you’re the person you’ve said you are.

 

This might be by asking structed, competency based questions “Tell me about a time…”, it might be asking you to explain past experiences or asking the really awkward questions like “What is your biggest weakness?” (my answer is: Chocolate…).

 

All these questions are set out with one purpose in mind. To see if you really are the person you’ve said you are on the CV, or if it’s been written for you and you don’t have the slightest clue what’s on there.

 

Your advisor can help you prepare, ask them to give you sample questions and think about what your answer would be.

 

I know you’re probably thinking that they don’t know anything and I’m sure someone will reply about how they’re not qualified to professorial level in CBT, ABC or Interviewology. But, they can give you the resources that will help YOU to prepare.

 

It’s well known what questions you’re likely to face dependant upon the type of role you’re applying for so by knowing what to expect (or at least having some forewarning) you can hopefully take away some of the anxiety related to uncertainty.

 

Equally, interviewers are human (well, the last time I checked I still had a pulse…) and can see that someone is nervous and make some allowance for this. However, if I’m interviewing for a role that requires a strong personality in the face of the public then I expect resilience in the controlled environment of an interview.

 

So, in the face of all that, what aspect of the interview is your downfall? Is it nerves, drying up, appearance, language etc etc etc? Your advisor will need to know what you feel will help you succeed. But, avoidance won’t work – it’s like any other issue. I’m arachnaphobic but I can’t eliminate spiders from my house so I learn to deal with them. I make sure that I’m able to deal with them despite the fact they are my downfall by just getting it over and done with.

 

So, what’s your thing? What would make the difference when your ‘spider’ walks out across the floor? Is it accepting that it’s just a spider, probably hasn’t realised I’m even there and certainly doesn’t want to eat me? Because, it’s just an interview, the only reason the employer wants you there is to give you the job and they certainly don’t want to eat you…

 

A very good post and along the lines I am thinking of.

 

Key points extracted by me:

 

Avoidance as a technique is a lose-lose scenario. Unless you want avoidance as a way of life. Not recommended.

 

Resilience is something to try and attain. When people undergo a crisis and a loss of confidence, the objective (my view) is try to develop the resilience, which some people may say is strength or confidence.

 

Whereas confidence can only be attained by your own efforts (beware of adversaries), resilience may need a support group.

 

One thing that the Work Programme advisors do not help with is attaining resilience.

 

There is another factor that comes into play and is ignored. That is the suitability of personalities to the jobs they are looking for. Trying to get jobs which you are unsuited to does nothing for confidence or resilience, nothing for the employer either, and is generally a waste of time.

 

Therein is an interesting study of how to get people into work, trying to match their aptitudes (rather than skills) to their best jobs. I would thought this would be careers advice. But the work programme does not do this. It matches skills only. I am trying to think my way around this.

 

Resilience has been shown to be more than just the capacity of individuals to cope well under adversity. Resilience is better understood as the opportunity and capacity of individuals to navigate their way to psychological, social, cultural and physical resources that may sustain their well-being, and their opportunity and capacity individually and collectively to negotiate for these resources to be provided and experienced in culturally meaningful ways. (wiki)

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Addenda: the way that some work advisors browbeat their clients is counter productive to some clients. There personalities do not respond this way. It may work for some people.

 

Itis a dog eat dog world, sometimes, especially in retail in sales. Some adverts for job advisors ask for experience in sales. Not my forte and I am not impressed. It may actually suit about 45% of the working age group, so they are not wrong. Just a little bit less than half right.

 

I think the Job Shop initiative may work better for some out of work people. For those people who are shy rather than avoidant?

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its everything really, i get very nervous about interviews and it shows..i mumble and stammer and even though i do loads of preparation to plan how im going to answer questions when it comes to the interview i always mess up. basically i plan what im going say and how im going to answer questions but when it comes to the actual interview it doesn't come out the way i had planned if that makes sense.

 

I have employed someone like this. With confidence in his own field, his stammer goes away completely. A star in his own right. He plans it, of course. I think he gets too detailed but I just let him get on with it, cause it works.

 

I do not attempt to baulk his style. I just try to support his efforts as far as possible. He is good with children.

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Joeski, the definition of insanity is...

 

So next time try this:

 

1. Prior research well in advance, don't fret the night before.

 

2. Don't make anxious predictions; ie. don't try to guess what you'll be asked. This way things won't seem like they're not going to plan.

 

3. Go into the interview not giving a £$%^ if you succeed or not; as has been said you effectively have nothing to lose.

 

4. Think about your answers, smile if you get thrown a 'trick' question and adopt the attitude that you're selling the best version of yourself, almost as if you're assuming the identity of a confidence trickster.

 

5. No interview is ever perfect, everyone ums and ah's, a lot of people stutter occasionally, most applicants will have difficulty with some of the questions. You don't have to be perfect because no-one else will be. By getting to the interview stage the employer thinks you have the skills, so as long as you're polite and don't have an attitude problem you're already most of the way there.

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I have employed someone like this. With confidence in his own field, his stammer goes away completely. A star in his own right. He plans it, of course. I think he gets too detailed but I just let him get on with it, cause it works.

 

I do not attempt to baulk his style. I just try to support his efforts as far as possible. He is good with children.

 

You’re spot on, a good performance at interview doesn’t mean they’re the best person for the job. However, as said above the role being applied for tends to dictate the character traits that are most important. Retail Sales really is dog eat dog (plenty of personal experience…) as if I was recruiting for that I’d place a massive amount of importance on someone’s ‘gift of the gab’, if it was a non-public facing, non competitive role then less so.

 

There is one route that might work here and it depends entirely upon Joe.

 

Relying solely on the WP, especially as it seems that he doesn’t have much faith in his advisor, might not be prudent in the long run.

 

Perhaps exploring some opportunities in volunteering might help build up resilience and confidence and, as I’ve seen happen in the past – may open up the door to a role that’s offered rather than recruited for. I worked in the third sector for 6 or 7 years and on occasion, took volunteers onto the payroll for very specific projects where they’d already proved themselves over a longer term. So, in fairness they’ve still been interviewed but perhaps over several months.

 

That said, massive disclaimer here – don’t rely on getting a job with a charity just because you’ve volunteered there.

My views are my own and are not representative of any organisation. if you've found my post helpful please click on the star below.

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Retail Sales really is dog eat dog (plenty of personal experience…) as if I was recruiting for that I’d place a massive amount of importance on someone’s ‘gift of the gab’, if it was a non-public facing, non competitive role then less so.

 

Sometimes the term "horse****" is used. If you think your fellow employees are crazy and you don't want to be driven crazy yourself ...

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My approach to an interview is to just play it by ear and not take it too seriously - after all, you're walking in with no job so anything else is pure bonus, you certainly won't walk out with less.

 

I've never liked the whole 'suit and tie, firm handshake, etc' bit. Any fool can wear a suit but it doesn't mean they're going to be a wonderful human being to employ. When I had interviews for graphic design jobs the whole thing was totally 'anti- interview'; you turned up in jeans and shirt and had a very informal chat with someone equally casual. They were looking for personality, rather than qualifications or vast experience. Very laid back and not at all stressful.

 

I've always maintained that an employer makes up his mind one way or the other very quickly and if your 'face fits' then you have a massive advantage. I've had jobs in the past based on 2 mins actual 'job talk' and 30 mins chatting away about sport, pubs, etc. I don't think there are any hard and fast rules about interviews - despite what the WP's will tell you. They're all individual and being the 'right face at the right time' plays a big part. A lot of it is down to fate or luck or whatever you would call it.

 

Don't forget that often the interviewer has absolutely no idea what they're looking for. We assume they want the most skilled and qualified person but that's not always the case. For example, they may have an office full of people with a great sense of humour and a happy atmosphere, so your skills and experience won't count if you come across as a serious person - they may employ someone less skilled but who has a cheery disposition and will fit in better. It's all pot luck.

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I've always maintained that an employer makes up his mind one way or the other very quickly and if your 'face fits' then you have a massive advantage. I've had jobs in the past based on 2 mins actual 'job talk' and 30 mins chatting away about sport, pubs, etc. I don't think there are any hard and fast rules about interviews - despite what the WP's will tell you. They're all individual and being the 'right face at the right time' plays a big part. A lot of it is down to fate or luck or whatever you would call it.

 

 

The 30 second judgement is something well all do as humans, we quite often send one of the non-interviewing managers to go and make the candidate a coffee while they’re waiting and have a chat with them in a far less formal manner, that’s as much a part of the interview for our place as the structured questions, finding out if someone can not only do the job but also fit in with your existing team is vital. Getting it wrong can be a nightmare for the company and the individual.

 

 

I don't think there are any hard and fast rules about interviews - despite what the WP's will tell you.

 

You’re right, I’ve found that your ability to adapt to the situation is as important as sticking to ‘the rules’ but until you feel confident enough to start experimenting then having a framework like the WP suggest isn’t a bad place to start. It’s certainly better from an interviewer’s perspective than someone who comes across as not-bothered.

 

I remember well two stand out candidates out of god-only-knows how many people I’ve interviewed.

 

The first was a guy applying for a job as a driver, he called me the day before the interview and told me that he was sorry but he couldn’t afford a suit and tie and wondered if I would mind if he came in wearing his ‘normal’ clothes. Of course I agreed and his interview went brilliantly as I already had a slight insight into his personality. He was working for us by the end of the same week.

 

The second was for an administrator. We asked if he’d ever found a process that he thought he could adapt to make easier or more efficient and then gone on to make those changes. He sat back in his chair, laughed and said ‘No’. So, always the optimist, I asked if he had even seen something he thought might have been made simpler but wasn’t able to implement it. He leant over the table and asked ‘are you a manager?’, ‘Yes’ I said. ‘Well, that’s YOUR job now isn’t it…’ was his reply.

 

Needless to say his interview didn’t go any further, what made us smile the most was that he phoned later that day to ask when he was starting.

My views are my own and are not representative of any organisation. if you've found my post helpful please click on the star below.

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Interviews and interviewers come in numerous states from employers who just want the face to fit to employers that cannot make up their mind.

 

There is only two tendencies I have observed over above the random, that young pretty girl get certain jobs with certain managers even though they are not the best at doing the job (arguable) and women managers employing single mothers and the secondary demands of their children mean they do not provide a very reliable service to customers.

 

Both are extremely annoying, the second one much more so.

 

I also really dislike it when interviews are obviously lines from a script and that there is no opportunity to be informal. I have received lots of job applications, mostly speculative, over a thousand in total, when I was in business. They were all very much the same and most people were overqualified. I was looking for intelligence not realms of qualifications.

 

As an employer, I have learnt not to work on emotional reactions, the face fits, as it can go horribly wrong. Not sure what the best way to go about choosing employees but it is not the single interview. Psychological profiling might be better. This happens and can be off-putting because the interviewer might be working to a script and boxes are ticked.

 

For administrative jobs, I have found that you are excluded for initiative. It is just not wanted nowadays.

 

I never put down disabled just to get an interview. I did that twice and I thought I got messed about. I want too get a job on merit, not charity.

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Addenda: skilled professional interviewers with big firms are to my taste. Bosses of small businesses and it is all personalities. His personality usually.

 

I do not usually try and fit my act towards the job on offer as the recruitment specialists are most keen on. Maybe I am wrong as I am out of work? I just try to be myself.

 

The thinking is that I just say what I am and what I can do and hope they can fit a square peg into a round hole. Adaptability is not a weakness nor a strong point. My reasoning is that I have done too many jobs that I have been unhappy in.

 

Do others try and tailor the job application and interview towards the job in question? I do research as far as possible and quite often quite a lot, even as much as getting a street opinion of the firm from someone who has worked there.

 

I would not normally go as far as reducing my qualifications or experience on my job appplication form to give me better chances. I have done so without success.

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You're right, again, in very many respects.

 

The structured (read scripted) interview has it's place due to companies wishing to measure everyone with the same 'yard stick' when it comes to selection. It lessens the chance of managers leaning towards a certain candidate due to appearance or family situation - but only when used properly by the employer...

 

I've been for a number of roles where psychometrics and personality testing have been factored in and the issue with this is that with practice, it's possible to throw the results in your favour.

 

One of the more effective recruitment tools is the 'assessment centre' that gives employers the chance to spend the day with potential candidates and see how they perform over a number of tasks. However, fortune still favours the brave on these days because if you don't speak up, you don't get noticed.

 

-------------------------------

 

I must admit, altering my application to meet the requirements of the job has given me the most success and, is something I now look for when recruiting. With respect to anyone, if I'm recruiting for job X then I want to know how your experience in your previous roles will help you in the role I'm advertising.

 

There's a lot to be said for using the same language the employer is using. They've chosen those traits and abilities as the best description of the person that they're looking for. So, to demonstrate how you meet those demands, in my own experience, works well.

 

I've seen this to the extent (especially in the 3rd Sector) where employers will ask for a personal statement about how you feel you match the requirements of the role, using the job description and person spec as a basis for your writing.

 

I do however completely agree that you should never dumb down your achievements, they're something that you've worked to attain and you should feel rightly proud of them. However, I would take a moment to think about how these apply to the job I was applying for. My private pilots licence has nothing to do with the desk that I drive now... But, I do use it as an example of working in line with very strict regulations, prioritising workloads, managing multiple demands etc etc etc...

 

The issue of lack of informality is something we address by the 'lets have a coffee / chat while the interviewers get ready for you' with one of the other managers. It gives us as much insight as the structured questions do but, as you say there is a massive component of luck / right place, right time involved. So, take control of the bits that you can influence like appearance, preparation, personality and confidence and the rest will, sooner or later follow.

My views are my own and are not representative of any organisation. if you've found my post helpful please click on the star below.

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-------------------------------

 

I must admit, altering my application to meet the requirements of the job has given me the most success and, is something I now look for when recruiting. With respect to anyone, if I'm recruiting for job X then I want to know how your experience in your previous roles will help you in the role I'm advertising.

 

 

Correction. I have several CVs and I choose which one is most approrpiriate.

 

Jobs with application forms ask how previous experience fits in with roles demanded of the job. I treat this bit as important.

 

It all tricky though. e.g. I think I am reasonably good at dealing with the public, but if I was doing it all day, it would wear me out. Interviews are OK, public speaking, TV, presentations Ok, but if you want me to waffle on all day like a radio presenter, or expect me to have the stamina of a teacher all day. Think again, it would wear me out. Some people are extraverted and some people are introverted and with the best will in the world, I am not an ideal salesman.

 

Work Programme advisors often comes from a sales/recruitment background. Some of their clients are not of this type and do not naturally get on together and it can be a rather difficult relationship.

 

PS: my approach to an interview is do some groundwork to respond to any awkward questions and reduce the inevitable bit where I have to perform on my feet. All good fun like an actor in a play with a very loose script and I can adapt my words to circumstances. I try to be precise and clear. The only thing that throws me is if the interviewer repeats the same question I have already answered. This just puzzles me. It is like he has not understood my first answer.

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Can anyone answer this question is it mandatory to go to a WP appointment. If the appointment was made by telephone and I wasn't given a written MAN can their sanction me for it if i don't turn up as I did not receive a proper written notification?

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Can anyone answer this question is it mandatory to go to a WP appointment. If the appointment was made by telephone and I wasn't given a written MAN can their sanction me for it if i don't turn up as I did not receive a proper written notification?

 

They must issue a MAN with the appropriate wording. If they have not done so, you should not be sanctioned. However, don't be surprised if the WP provider refers you anyhow and you have to argue the point with JCP.

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Hi

 

My son has to attend ingeus appointments he failed to show up at his last one and now has a sanction against him, The last one he attended was the 13 of december and was told in that interview that she would be busy until after the xmas period.

 

My son was calm at this as christmas is a hard time for him bein an anxiety and depression sufferer we go to the interview via a taxi arranged by ingeus and a private room with his mum.

 

we record convos and have not signed anything in ingeus to pass on data etc.

 

The appointments was usually once every 6 weeks but now the advisor the last time he was there booked the next one on the 18th on December 7 days later! yet she explained how busy she was with 200 clients a week on a 3 day shift and said it won't be after christmas! my son was panicking as he's got to then do a spec letter and build himself up to go again so soon, he could not even leave the house that day with panic but the advisor was having non of it and sanctioned him straight away as it was not a valid reason for being worked up ever xmas and not being well to come.

 

We filled out a reasons letter explaining all this that he's struggling getting out the house and can't cope and he's been issued diazepam by his doctor to help but still the job centre gave him the sanction!

 

So today we called ingeus to get another appointment and will try to get him to the next, they have changed his advisor for the 3rd time! My son gets to know someone there and they change again its all very stressful.

 

What would be the best advise in dealing with this sanction? I really don't think its fair!

 

They said they would not make him apply for any jobs nor would he have to seek work but them doing a CV out of what he used to by like by using his past experience in work (how he felt back then) and sending him home to do a spec letter surely is actively seeking a job?

 

I am sick of these bully tactics the last advisor he had on the 13th december let him into a false sense of security saying she understands, she's currently on anti depressants, been homeless has post traumatic stress and was left after domestic violence bring up a kid on her own!

 

Is that really appropriate for someone advising my son on his mental health and supporting him?

 

I find all this disgusting and would like any additional help to get this sanction lifted I am so worried for my soon its left him in tears!

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thanks antone for the info it just that i have a weekly appointments with the JCP and i ask my adviser (whose an old friend of mine) to make the appointments on the same day and around the the same time as my WP appointments and i think its peeing my WP adviser off a little:-D

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Just thought this might be useful.

 

Of course you would have to tell them where you are applying and who offers you employment for the changes to be of any use to them. And remember you do not have to tell the job centre why you are ending your claim, just need to supply and end date.

 

http://refuted.org.uk/2013/12/29/cashforconsent/

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Larbour Party announces plans to replace back to work scheme

 

Don't forget who was responsible for handing out contracts to these big companies in the first place. It was Labour that gave us the New Deal programme and the Flexible New Deal - The only real difference between the old versions and the new is the payment model. The content has remained the same, as has the scope for fraud.

 

If Labour do scrap the current scheme and leave it to councils to provide local programmes, who do you think will staff them ?

If the current providers don't subcontract to the councils, in all probability, the same people will be employed all be it with a different paymaster.

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Hi

 

My son has to attend ingeus appointments he failed to show up at his last one and now has a sanction against him, The last one he attended was the 13 of december and was told in that interview that she would be busy until after the xmas period.

 

My son was calm at this as christmas is a hard time for him bein an anxiety and depression sufferer we go to the interview via a taxi arranged by ingeus and a private room with his mum.

 

we record convos and have not signed anything in ingeus to pass on data etc.

 

The appointments was usually once every 6 weeks but now the advisor the last time he was there booked the next one on the 18th on December 7 days later! yet she explained how busy she was with 200 clients a week on a 3 day shift and said it won't be after christmas! my son was panicking as he's got to then do a spec letter and build himself up to go again so soon, he could not even leave the house that day with panic but the advisor was having non of it and sanctioned him straight away as it was not a valid reason for being worked up ever xmas and not being well to come.

 

We filled out a reasons letter explaining all this that he's struggling getting out the house and can't cope and he's been issued diazepam by his doctor to help but still the job centre gave him the sanction!

 

So today we called ingeus to get another appointment and will try to get him to the next, they have changed his advisor for the 3rd time! My son gets to know someone there and they change again its all very stressful.

 

What would be the best advise in dealing with this sanction? I really don't think its fair!

 

They said they would not make him apply for any jobs nor would he have to seek work but them doing a CV out of what he used to by like by using his past experience in work (how he felt back then) and sending him home to do a spec letter surely is actively seeking a job?

 

I am sick of these bully tactics the last advisor he had on the 13th december let him into a false sense of security saying she understands, she's currently on anti depressants, been homeless has post traumatic stress and was left after domestic violence bring up a kid on her own!

 

Is that really appropriate for someone advising my son on his mental health and supporting him?

 

I find all this disgusting and would like any additional help to get this sanction lifted I am so worried for my soon its left him in tears!

 

Hi Caspa,

 

I have to admit I've read your post a few times before I've come to typing this.

 

Is your son claiming the correct benefit? If he's been sanctioned would I be right in thinking that he's a JSA claimant? I'd have thought that perhaps, given your explanation of the severity of his anxiety, that he might be more appropriately claiming ESA.

 

Actively seeking work is doing just that, searching for and applying for jobs. If your son is being asked to start that process by making a CV and spec letter but not send them, then no - he's not actively seeking work but he is partaking in work related activity.

 

Mental health issues impact at least one in four people in the UK over the course of a year, me included a few years ago. It doesn't mean I'm any less capable of advising others or making good decisions, just as hopefully in time, your son may well be in a better place and be able to do the same. It doesn't make anyone less capable if they've been affected themselves. I can't think of anything that someone who has experienced such issues herself wouldn't be able to offer in terms of advice that someone who'd read a book on the subject could.

 

The biggest piece of advice that I can give is to speak with an adviser at your local CAB, ask them to review the sanction and if needs be, assist your son in making an appeal if you don't agree with the reasons provided.

 

WP advisers can only 'raise a doubt' to be reviewed by the DWP. By that they explain what the claimant has been asked to do and demonstrate how they failed to meet the requirements. It's the DWP that decide on the 'merits' of the doubt and apply the sanction. Hence any appeal must be logged with them and show any mitigating circumstances, for example did your Son call the provider that morning and ask to re-arrange / cancel or did he simply not attend? Perhaps his GP would be willing to retrospectively provide a 'fit note' in light of his condition.

 

I hope you get things sorted out...

My views are my own and are not representative of any organisation. if you've found my post helpful please click on the star below.

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I was 'chosen' to go on to the work programme after Christmas (I know how lucky am I!).

I have got myself an interview and was told by the job centre that when I get an interview I can go to them for help with a suit for said interview, which was great being a single parent without a penny to spare!

I called the job centre to tell them about the upcoming interview and was told, that because I am now on the work programme I have to go through them.

Ok I said, gave them a call and was told their budget is £20............!!!

 

Now I'm no super model, I have some junk in my trunk (so to speak :razz:) and so can't really go to the advised Primark for a suit (I didn't even know the slave labour that made Primark clothes stretched to suits but whatever....)

 

I called the job centre back and spoke to someone else and explained this, only to be told the same 'You have to go through the work programme" blah blah blah.

 

Now am I the only one who finds this totally unfair. Those who haven't had the 'luck' of being 'chosen to go on work programme' get to go to the BHS group and choose an interview outfit that is going to fit and not look like you dragged it out the bin, where as us lucky enough to be chosen have and have actually got off our butts to get a damn interview are being kicked again.

 

I'm going to be calling to speak to a manager tomorrow, but I'm afraid I'm going to get the same answer. Has anyone else had this problem as I really need help.

 

ALSO I now have to sign on at the job centre AS WELL as going to the work programme. Two people doing one persons job - how clever!

 

P.s sorry if this makes no sense, I am absolutely fuming!!!! :-x:-x:-x

Edited by duffydion
forgot some info
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Now I'm no super model, I have some junk in my trunk (so to speak :razz:) and so can't really go to the advised Primark for a suit.

 

The following suggestion may not (excuse the pun) suit everyone, but.... Have a rummage around in your local charity shops - I found a half decent suit a couple of years back for a fiver with a bonus of some loose change in one of the pockets. If you're lucky, you may even find some designer labels that would have cost a fortune when new.

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No... you can't eat my brain just yet. I need it a little while longer.

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