Jump to content


Legal Threat Letter


style="text-align: center;">  

Thread Locked

because no one has posted on it for the last 3645 days.

If you need to add something to this thread then

 

Please click the "Report " link

 

at the bottom of one of the posts.

 

If you want to post a new story then

Please

Start your own new thread

That way you will attract more attention to your story and get more visitors and more help 

 

Thanks

Recommended Posts

Hi All,

 

I made the mistake of signing up for some free domains from eclipse in 2006.

 

They offered them free so I created an account and registered 6 domains, at the time i dont remember entering any card details since it was free and they had my work address not my home address.

 

Today i got a letter from them threatening legal action over a £100 debt, on the basis that they were auto renewed (every 2 years) after the free period ended (I assume this was in the fine print) and came as news to me.

 

Im just interested where i stand.. Im pretty sure they don't have my home address or my card details (not sure how i can check?) As far as im concerned anybody could have signed up under a false name/address or worse the address of somebody they didn't like.

 

What kind of proof does an online retail need to prove ive entered into some kind of contract with them.

 

I cannot have any kind of legal action going against the company as thats not fair really.

 

Just wondering if theres a way i can ring up and get it wiped off, I wouldn't mind if they had warned me they were going to bill me at the time of signing up.. but a legal threat out the blue 7 years on makes me :-x:-x

 

Just wondering where i stand really so any help would be appreciated

Edited by Furax
Link to post
Share on other sites

I suggest to fish through the The Consumer Protection from Unfair Trading Regulations 2008, to see what you can find that fits.

 

The validity of a contract is as unclear as your understanding of the circumstance. Basically, a contract exists in the minds of the parties who agree to contract. If, in good faith there was no reason to believe that there was a contract, there is therefore a case to be made of that. Alternatively, it may be said that it was daft to expect to get something for nothing.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Recently Browsing   0 Caggers

    No registered users viewing this page.


  • Have we helped you ...?


×
×
  • Create New...