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Retailer to Manufacture?


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Can some one possibly point me in the right direction, I am looking for information on how things work between retailers and manufactures. If a customer returns that i faulty(?) then can the retailer refer it back to the manufacture?

 

Secondly is this the same for the EU? Trying to find the correct legislation is beginning to be a bit of a head ache!

 

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Soga is the legislation regarding faulty goods in UK, EU regs similar but slightly different.

Retailer is totaly responsible for any faults, unless ther is an extended warranty from manufacturer, but that only supplements you statutory rights and does not replace them.

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  • 2 weeks later...

If you return faulty goods to the retailer, you get a refund. The retailer therefore loses his profit (which he may well have fairly earnt, had the manufacturer made the goods properly). The retailer also gets back the faulty goods from you , which may be fairly valueless to him. Unless he can easily return them to his supplier who may even be the manufacturer. The manufacturer may or may not replace or credit the faulty goods. On the other hand, the manufacturer may have gone bust or be in the Far East. So, the consumer is protected by consumer law, but the retailer has no protection and can lose the full value of the broken item. It can be tough being a retailer when faced with a request for a refund.

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Secondly is this the same for the EU? Trying to find the correct legislation is beginning to be a bit of a head ache!

 

:sad:

 

The short answer is Yes, it is exactly the same for the EU in so far as an issue is covered by European Directives or Regulations, for the European Directives and Regulations are the correct legislation because of the Treaty on European Union.

 

Any divergence on the part of national legislation intended to implement a Directive is subject to the Ultimate authority of the European Court of Justice, with the authority to appropriately correct a local version.

 

The first port of call with regard to consumer goods and associated guarantees is thus the EU Directive 1999/44/EC. The recitations to a directive, i.e. (1) to (26), are supposed to count above all else, if in doubt.

 

What might be called differences occur when and where a Directive specifically allows as much. There should therefore be no chance of being mislead by referring yourself directly to the European Legislation in the first instance, which is typically a good deal easier to assimilate than the horribly confused mess of statutory provisions supposed to implement the relevant rights on your behalf, in the UK.

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