Jump to content


Can I be made to go into work?


style="text-align: center;">  

Thread Locked

because no one has posted on it for the last 4058 days.

If you need to add something to this thread then

 

Please click the "Report " link

 

at the bottom of one of the posts.

 

If you want to post a new story then

Please

Start your own new thread

That way you will attract more attention to your story and get more visitors and more help 

 

Thanks

Recommended Posts

I have just worked 6 days on the trot,today off, then work again tomorrow. My other day off would be Thursday, but I am booked down for a all day training at work(compulsory) for then.Then no more days off again for 13 days, I should have next Wednesday and Thursday off also, but they have also been booked down for me to go in for 2 full days of training(compulsary), I work in a care home. Is this allowed, I know I have to go to these trainings and all, but from tomorrow, if I attend all those training days plus my work days inbetween, I will not get a proper day off again till nearly 14 days away.

 

I get up at 5am leave at 6.20 and walk the 2 miles to work(no buses that early round here) work at 7am. I have worked a few 12 hour shifts this week and I am literally b!!!!!!ed.

 

oh and by the way, they know that I look after my pensioner mother, she is disabled and cannot go shopping herself and all that,she will be stuck in the house all that time.She is dodgy on her feet and well, you just think b!!!!!! it "my moms health comes first".

Link to post
Share on other sites

Is the care home private or LA owned. How are they treating the patients/residents in the home. Is there enough activities for residents and is there enough staff employed to interact with the residents.

 

I am interested as I have family in a care home and I know how some of these place treat residents which can be something shocking to say the least. If they are exploiting staff then it follows they will do the same to their residents.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello, I will just copy what I have wrote on another forum.....

 

To tell you the truth I have just started last week. I have all my certificates which are valid till next year, manual handling, first aid etc, you name it. But being in a new care home, I suppose I am still required to do these trainings.

So I am still on trial(3 months) no contract. My last job I was there for 10 years, only left to relocate here, I have visions of it being my shortest job yet.

I am still learning the ropes so to speak, about the residents and all, but that does not seem to make any difference, I was slow getting them to bed Monday night and the senior said, I should know things by now, and only being there a week is no excuse for not getting your work done. She said she was going to mention this to the manager. So probably going to be called in to the manager tomorrow.

 

Just got up. The 14 hour shifts, you do get a 2 hour break,yes, between 1-3pm. But, it must be all the new hours are just tiring me, what with having to do all the stuff in the house for the mother, cooking,cleaning etc. Remember, no buses to work so early, and instead of waiting 30 mins for a bus home at 9pm at night, another 2 mile walk back home. By the time you get back home, it is knocking on 10pm, have a sit down and something to eat, usually a sandwich, then to bed, then back up at 5am again. I have never known anything like it, and no, I am not work shy or anything, I have worked ever since leaving school at 18, 22 years, only 3 jobs in all that time. This I feel though may be my shortest ever, I usually make it to 6-7 years at least in a job.

 

 

Compared to where I have worked before, I do seem to be askinng a lot of questions here, should you be doing it like that or this way, their manual handling is way different to how I was taught. I am looking at the other members of staff, and thinking "God, look how they are handling them, like a bag of potatoes". But being new, you do not want ot get off on the wrong foot, so just say nothing. Most of the staff seem to live there, well in the short space of time I have been there, it is always the same staff, I hope they do not expect me to work all hours God sends. I will gladly do a fair days work for a fair days pay, but I will not be taken for a mug.

 

Oh the care home is private (dementia mainly), the owners own another home also.

Link to post
Share on other sites

"God, look how they are handling them, like a bag of potatoes".

 

Oh the care home is private (dementia mainly), the owners own another home also.

 

These greedy home owners are in it just for the money. You should report this to Age UK there are many organisations to report these home to.... you do not have to give your name but explain how frail residents are been handled like a sacks of potatoes and you are concerned about this. Also explain that you are expected to work so many hrs and that you feel that residents/patients are suffering as a result.

You can report this in confidence to the authorities and say that you do not want give your name. Get inspector to call to the home to make assessment they should not tell the home that they will making inspection. Also tell the authorities how you are concerned about what happens during night time as some staff do a day job and work in care homes doing night shifts as they are able to sleep during their night shifts and night time staff turn off emergency bells or put them out of reach of the patients. This is prevalent in home and should be reported immediately.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Sarah - you are entitled under the working time regulations 1998, to one day off per week - it can be averaged over two weeks, and it can in some circumstances be deferred (but not withdrawn).

ACAS are usually very good, and will be able to advise you whether this is acceptable or not, given the nature of the job and whether training can be considered "work".

 

If you are being made to physically lift residents who cannot weight bear, most of these manoeuvres are condemned and for very good reason too - it can cause serious injury to both you and the resident concerned. You are within your rights to refuse to do this. These types of lifts can only be carried out where there is an immediate and serious risk to a patient if it is not done - getting them out of the building in the event of a fire, for example. They are not permissible in every day care of a patient/resident. I'll post below some of the lifts that are condemned, when and why - you might find it a useful tool to shove under the boss' nose if needed, or indeed if these lifts are being carried out and you want to report the matter. If you do a search on google of "contriversial manual manoeuvres" you will likely find more which are not condemned but thought high risk and banned in many areas, such as the NHS.

The drag lift

 

Condemned by the RCN in 1981. Involves carers placing a hand or arm under the patient's armpits.

 

Risks:

 

Damage to the carer’s spine, shoulders, wrist and knees. For the patient, there is risk of injury to the shoulder, soft tissues in armpit, dislocation of the shoulder and fractures to the humerus. It can also be a very painful experience for a patient.

 

Orthodox (also known as "cradle" lift)

 

Condemned by the RCN in 1987. Any modification of this lift using handling slings is also banned. Using two plastic handling slings - one under the patient's back and one under the patient's thighs- is still an orthodox lift and mustn't be carried out. The original method used to lift a patient where a handler stood on either side, clasped their wrists under the patient's thighs and behind their back.

 

Risks:

Because this manoeuvre involves the carer lifting at arms length whilst twisting at the trunk and holding the load away from the carer’s centre of gravity, it is considered extremely dangeroud for a carer to perfom as it can cause many injuries to spine, trunk, knees and arms, and is also likely to cause injury to the patient's knees and shoulders

 

Autralian (also known as "shoulder") lift

 

Condemned by the RCN in 1996. Two carers. Both face in the opposite direction to the patient. The carers have their inner knee on the bed and their outer foot on the floor. They then bend forward to place their inside shoulders under the client’s upper arm, prior to carrying out the lift.

RisksFor the carer, this is an uneven load, with force being applied to one shoulder only. Danger of damage to muscle, injury to spine. For the patient, this lift can result in soft tissue damage and injury to sternum. Again, this lift in itself can be uncomfortable for the patient. Being dragged up a bed in such a manner can cause friction burns which is easily done to the infirm.

 

Hope this helps a little.

My advice is based on my opinion, my experience and my education. I do not profess to be an expert in any given field. If requested, I will provide a link where possible to relevant legislation or guidance, so that advice provided can be confirmed and I do encourage others to follow those links for their own peace of mind. Sometimes my advice is not what people necesserily want to hear, but I will advise on facts as I know them - although it may not be what a person wants to hear it helps to know where you stand. Advice on the internet should never be a substitute for advice from your own legal professional with full knowledge of your individual case.

 

 

Please do not seek, offer or produce advice on a consumer issue via private message; it is against

forum rules to advise via private message, therefore pm's requesting private advice will not receive a response.

(exceptions for prior authorisation)

 

 

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Risks:

 

Damage to the carer’s spine, shoulders, wrist and knees. For the patient, there is risk of injury to the shoulder, soft tissues in armpit, dislocation of the shoulder and fractures to the humerus. It can also be a very painful experience for a patient.

 

Orthodox (also known as "cradle" lift)

 

Condemned by the RCN in 1987. Any modification of this lift using handling slings is also banned. Using two plastic handling slings - one under the patient's back and one under the patient's thighs- is still an orthodox lift and mustn't be carried out. The original method used to lift a patient where a handler stood on either side, clasped their wrists under the patient's thighs and behind their back.

 

Risks:

Because this manoeuvre involves the carer lifting at arms length whilst twisting at the trunk and holding the load away from the carer’s centre of gravity, it is considered extremely dangeroud for a carer to perfom as it can cause many injuries to spine, trunk, knees and arms, and is also likely to cause injury to the patient's knees and shoulders

 

Autralian (also known as "shoulder") lift

 

Condemned by the RCN in 1996. Two carers. Both face in the opposite direction to the patient. The carers have their inner knee on the bed and their outer foot on the floor. They then bend forward to place their inside shoulders under the client’s upper arm, prior to carrying out the lift.

RisksFor the carer, this is an uneven load, with force being applied to one shoulder only. Danger of damage to muscle, injury to spine. For the patient, this lift can result in soft tissue damage and injury to sternum. Again, this lift in itself can be uncomfortable for the patient. Being dragged up a bed in such a manner can cause friction burns which is easily done to the infirm.

 

Hope this helps a little.

It also causes broken bones to patients which happened to a close relative of mine. The private home did not bother to tell any family member about the broken bones and of course patients with dementia do not remember what has happened therefore cannot themselves tell relatives.

This private home was charging over 40k a year for this kind of treatment to residents/patients. Got my relative moved with great difficulty, but the new home is not much better, never enough staff to interact with residents, I cannot bear to think what happens to residents/patients at night time.

 

These homes take residents in to their care on the basis that they will care for them but they do not know how to do it. The homes do not have any outside secure space for active residents to get outside in the sun in the summer time. If residents have no family then they never get outside the home. How can that be caring for residents being locked up 24/7 never getting outside the home?

 

Staff that see patients not been cared for then they should report it as soon as possible as the residents cannot report it themselves. These homes are places where some residents will have to stay there for the rest of their lives. I can assure you, I would rather be brought out and shot then go into one of these places. Sadly it is a great fear for most elderly people to think that they will have to end their rest of their life in one of these uncaring home. :sad:

Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok,

 

From what you have told me, the residents are potentially being abused. This needs reporting NOW.

 

Have you signed anything to say you will work over 48hrs in a week? If so, then I'm afraid you're stuck. :???:

 

Im assuming that you work 12hr shifts? Most nursing homes do and it is accepted practice in terms of providing continuity of care during the day, especially with dementia patients. They also often have teams of staff who work say, for example, three days on, three days off.

 

Can you speak to the manager and ask to defer the training until another time? They may not have realised that you are doing so many days on the trot. (A long shot but worth a try).

 

I have managed a nursing home and worked in loads of them so do know what goes on in them when management arent around - people get into routines which are simply a case of doing things a certain way because its always been done that way. Until someone new comes in and challenges the practice that is...........

"In this situation, you know what you have to do? Just keep swimming, swimming, swimming." Dory - Finding Nemo.:wink:

Link to post
Share on other sites

Can we please keep the thread on topic? The OP has asked for advise on her rights as an employee. There is no doubt in my mind that some homes are not offering an acceptable level of care and I'm sure from the OP's posts she doesn't dispute this either. Of course she should report bad care practices. However, this is an employment subforum and the lady is asking for employment advice.

 

You are more than welcome to start a discussion in a new thread about bad care practices, in fact I would recommend it. You can input further information that might lend help to other relatives who find themselves in the awful situation of witnessing bad care practices. Many relatives are completely unaware of guidelines that care homes have to follow; a new thread discussing this can bring important matters out into the open for those seeking more information and help from those who have been there.

My advice is based on my opinion, my experience and my education. I do not profess to be an expert in any given field. If requested, I will provide a link where possible to relevant legislation or guidance, so that advice provided can be confirmed and I do encourage others to follow those links for their own peace of mind. Sometimes my advice is not what people necesserily want to hear, but I will advise on facts as I know them - although it may not be what a person wants to hear it helps to know where you stand. Advice on the internet should never be a substitute for advice from your own legal professional with full knowledge of your individual case.

 

 

Please do not seek, offer or produce advice on a consumer issue via private message; it is against

forum rules to advise via private message, therefore pm's requesting private advice will not receive a response.

(exceptions for prior authorisation)

 

 

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 Caggers

    • No registered users viewing this page.

  • Have we helped you ...?


×
×
  • Create New...