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    • HB, is the Kent/France issue related to current arrangement with French border officers in Kent and UK border officers in France ?   Not sure whether this  arrangement will change from 1/1/21, if there is no deal.   Given previous actions by French farmers and industrial action by others, then with UK out of the EU, I can see problems ahead. Could there be blockades at French ports, with UK unable to exert much pressure through EU ?      
    • Very good, UB.   I'm not clear on the status of Kent now. People are talking about it being part of France, etc, but how is tht when the 'border' only applies to lorries?
    • Campaign starts ? Independence for Kent, so it becomes a separate customs area and can charge a tariff on goods transported through its territory.  With the money raised, citizens of Kent might then have little or no income taxes to pay.   I could see this campaign being started and it could grow in popularity.   Would be funny if Brexit led to break up of UK and break away by some English counties. 
    • SERCO seem to be a default company that Government use to perform contact centre type tasks. So any department faced with a problem, say a sudden increase in incoming phone calls, which they cannot handle, because they are dealing with more immediate issues such as making payments to the public, may in the short term involve SERCO.   SERCO seem to employ a lot of security cleared, DBS checked, financial checked etc employees, so they seem to be equipped and ready to manage tasks on behalf of Government departments.   No idea just how much work SERCO does on behalf of Government, but I should imagine it makes up a sizeable chunk of their business.   Public Health departments may want to perform the work themselves, but given the number of employees required, the recruitment process involved, the hours of work 24/7 and just how quick they need to be set up to perform the work, I question whether they are better placed to do so.   I would always prefer public sector employees over outsourced contracts, but I can understand why Government uses companies such as SERCO. 
    • Well, we’ve found something we agree on.   you’ve described the unfairness, but haven’t said what (realistically!) you feel your options are.
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    • @curryspcworld @TeamKnowhowUK - Samsung 75 8K TV - completely broken by Currys. https://www.consumeractiongroup.co.uk/topic/426151-samsung-75-8k-tv-completely-broken-by-currys/&do=findComment&comment=5069075
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    • @skinnyfoodco Skinny Foods. https://www.consumeractiongroup.co.uk/topic/426130-skinny-foods/&do=findComment&comment=5068996
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    • I’m in desperate need of help
       
      I bought some clothes online in may through Evans and paid through PayPal
      returned them all seven days later
       
      I waited the 14days for my refund and no refund came
      I put in a dispute through PayPal but I didn’t get any emails to escalate the case - PayPal closed it. 
      evans said they couldn’t refund the money because PayPal have cancelled the refund because of the open dispute
       
      I contacted PayPal
      they said the dispute had been closed but Evans at no point had attempted a refund.
      fast forward to today
       
      I’ve got copies of numerous messages sent to and from twitter messages as it’s the only way I can contact them
      I’ve also contacted their customer service too
      all I get is PayPal have cancelled refund because dispute is still open.
       
      I have proved that the dispute is closed
      I have got an email saying that if Evans sent the refund they would accept it
      but up until the date I got the email they have not once attempted a refund .
       
       I have sent them a letter before court email
      I have even offered to have the full refund as a gift card just to get this sorted !
       
      I’m literally at the end of my tether and don’t know where to turn next !
       
      i suffer with mental health issues and this is affecting my health and I’d saved the money for a year to buy these clothes as I’m on a low income .
    • In desperate need of help. https://www.consumeractiongroup.co.uk/topic/425244-in-desperate-need-of-help/&do=findComment&comment=5067040
      • 29 replies

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Any help on this issue would be appreciated. I have copied and pasted below a draft of a letter I will be sending to T Mobile. Basically, my mobile broadband stick was stolen without my knowledge and used to make phone calls totalling £600 which I am now apparently liable for. The full detail is in the text below - any comments/ideas/similar experience/abuse welcomed. Cheers.

 

 

 

Dear Sirs,

 

I am writing to express my disapointment in T-Mobile's response to the recent theft of my mobile broadband USB stick. I have called T Mobile on three separate occasions to explain the circumstances surrounding the theft and have been referred only to the following point included in T Mobile's terms and conditions:- 'report your lost or stolen phone right away. Until you notify T-Mobile you're liable for the cost of any services used on your missing handset'.

 

By way of detail, the mobile broadband stick in question was stolen alongside my flatmates laptop in mid-July. As the stick was not used by myself or my flatmate, neither of us realised this at the time. As it was never used, it was not noticed missing until I received a bill of £105 for the period up until the 20th July. It appears that when stolen, the SIM card was removed from the USB and used to make a number of international calls to Iraq and Pakistan, amongst other places. The additional charges incurred in the period 20th July until the point I reported the stick stolen are £484 (as per my discussions with my T-Mobile colleague). As per your terms and conditions, I am apparently liable for those charges, even though common sense clearly indicates that they were clearly not incurred by myself. I have a police report detailing the date that the theft took place should you wish to see further proof of this.

 

Under normal circumstances, should I have had my mobile phone knowingly stolen and neglected my responsibility to report it, I would reluctantly accept liablity in accordance with your terms and conditions. However, given the specific circumstances listed below, I cannot accept that I can be held liable for these charges.

  • As you may have record of, I previously had a number of discussions with T-Mobile where I expressed my displeasure in the way in which the mobile broadband package was sold to me. I was called by a T-Mobile operator and offered a 'loyalty bonus'. I was informed that my usage of the service would be 'capped', never costing more than £10 and 'would work out about 30p a day if you used it for one day'. As I am sure you will agree, to express something as being 'capped' is grossly misleading in this context, and you can imagine my surprise when having never used the service, I received a bill of £10. At this point I attempted to cancel the service on the grounds I had been mis-sold the service. I was informed that I could cancel should I wish to pay up the remainder of the 24 month contract. I did not opt to take the matter any further and continued with the contract. My annoyance led to me switching my mobile phone operator for the first time.
  • I was never made aware at any point of how this product could be used. Whilst it may seem obvious to people in your industry that what I actually had was another phoneline, there should be no assumption that your customers have similar knowledge. As far as I was aware, I had a 'capped' service that allowed me to access mobile broadband, hence my apparent disregard for its value. That this product should then be fraudulently used in a manner I was not aware possible only adds to my annoyance.
  • I find it difficult to accept that when T-Mobile sell me a service 'capped' at £10 a month, you would then not notify me/cap the service when the usage has reached approximately 60 times what the normal charges in any given period would be. Not only this, it was being used for a purpose that it was not intended to make international phone calls to countries which I have absolutely no ties. It appears that T-Mobile were more than happy for charges to continue to be incurred in his fashion.

As I am sure you will appreciate, the fact that I am being told that I shall be liable for the full amount of the charges incurred has left me angry and disapointed. I have unknowlingly been the victim of crime that I had no knowledge there was a risk of, all in relation to a service that I still maintain I was deliberately misled into agreeing to purchase. As I have explained, I understand the contractual point which I have been referred to previously. Given my above comments, I cannot accept that it should apply in this case. As such, I have instructed my bank to suspend any further payments to T-Mobile until this matter is resolved, as I will be willing to take the complaint further should you not agree to rescind the charges. I would request that this amount is not passed on to any debt collection agency while these monies are in dispute.

I look forward to receiving your comments in due course.

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Any help on this issue would be appreciated. I have copied and pasted below a draft of a letter I will be sending to T Mobile. Basically, my mobile broadband stick was stolen without my knowledge and used to make phone calls totalling £600 which I am now apparently liable for. The full detail is in the text below - any comments/ideas/similar experience/abuse welcomed. Cheers.

 

 

 

Dear Sirs,

 

I am writing to express my disapointment in T-Mobile's response to the recent theft of my mobile broadband USB stick. I have called T Mobile on three separate occasions to explain the circumstances surrounding the theft and have been referred only to the following point included in T Mobile's terms and conditions:- 'report your lost or stolen phone right away. Until you notify T-Mobile you're liable for the cost of any services used on your missing handset'.

 

By way of detail, the mobile broadband stick in question was stolen alongside my flatmates laptop in mid-July. As the stick was not used by myself or my flatmate, neither of us realised this at the time. As it was never used, it was not noticed missing until I received a bill of £105 for the period up until the 20th July. It appears that when stolen, the SIM card was removed from the USB and used to make a number of international calls to Iraq and Pakistan, amongst other places. The additional charges incurred in the period 20th July until the point I reported the stick stolen are £484 (as per my discussions with my T-Mobile colleague). As per your terms and conditions, I am apparently liable for those charges, even though common sense clearly indicates that they were clearly not incurred by myself. I have a police report detailing the date that the theft took place should you wish to see further proof of this.

 

 

Under normal circumstances, should I have had my mobile phone knowingly stolen and neglected my responsibility to report it, I would reluctantly accept liablity in accordance with your terms and conditions. However, given the specific circumstances listed below, I cannot accept that I can be held liable for these charges.

  • As you may have record of, I previously had a number of discussions with T-Mobile where I expressed my displeasure in the way in which the mobile broadband package was sold to me. I was called by a T-Mobile operator and offered a 'loyalty bonus'. I was informed that my usage of the service would be 'capped', never costing more than £10 and 'would work out about 30p a day if you used it for one day'. As I am sure you will agree, to express something as being 'capped' is grossly misleading in this context, and you can imagine my surprise when having never used the service, I received a bill of £10. At this point I attempted to cancel the service on the grounds I had been mis-sold the service. I was informed that I could cancel should I wish to pay up the remainder of the 24 month contract. I did not opt to take the matter any further and continued with the contract. My annoyance led to me switching my mobile phone operator for the first time.
  • I was never made aware at any point of how this product could be used. Whilst it may seem obvious to people in your industry that what I actually had was another phoneline, there should be no assumption that your customers have similar knowledge. As far as I was aware, I had a 'capped' service that allowed me to access mobile broadband, hence my apparent disregard for its value. That this product should then be fraudulently used in a manner I was not aware possible only adds to my annoyance.
  • I find it difficult to accept that when T-Mobile sell me a service 'capped' at £10 a month, you would then not notify me/cap the service when the usage has reached approximately 60 times what the normal charges in any given period would be. Not only this, it was being used for a purpose that it was not intended to make international phone calls to countries which I have absolutely no ties. It appears that T-Mobile were more than happy for charges to continue to be incurred in his fashion.

As I am sure you will appreciate, the fact that I am being told that I shall be liable for the full amount of the charges incurred has left me angry and disapointed. I have unknowlingly been the victim of crime that I had no knowledge there was a risk of, all in relation to a service that I still maintain I was deliberately misled into agreeing to purchase. As I have explained, I understand the contractual point which I have been referred to previously. Given my above comments, I cannot accept that it should apply in this case. As such, I have instructed my bank to suspend any further payments to T-Mobile until this matter is resolved, as I will be willing to take the complaint further should you not agree to rescind the charges. I would request that this amount is not passed on to any debt collection agency while these monies are in dispute.

I look forward to receiving your comments in due course.

 

 

I've highlighted in bold the portion of the letter that worries me. T-Mobile can default you easier than any bank can. They have the best (or worst depending on your viewpoint) of both worlds. I'll explain a bit further, A bank has to subscribe to the rules and regulations of "the customer credit act" whereas T-Mobile don't give credit, so thats a whole set of rules they can ignore, so letting your bill go unpaid for any period of time can ruin your credit score (depending on the criteria searched, it can ruin it as much as a county court judgement!)

 

Also playing devils advocate a little here, they will state that the terms and conditions were sent out with the dongle, and it is up to you to read them, and using the service is accepting the terms and conditions.

If in doubt, contact a qualified insured legal professional (or my wife... she knows EVERYTHING)

 

Or send a cheque or postal order payable to Reclaim the Right Ltd.

to

923 Finchley Road London NW11 7PE

 

 

Click here if you fancy an email address that shows you mean business! (only £6 and that will really help CAG)

 

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Unfortunately, the buck will stop with you if you did not take reasonable care of the dingle, which includes PIN protracting it from unauthorised use. Issues of being miss old are of no help here, nor of hem owing you any duty od care. If you cancel your DD or net make the complete payment due, this will be flagged on your credit file. Even if you enter into an arrangement to pay it off, T mobile will still report this as a delayed settlement, do watch out got his.

 

It is a pain that most folk do not realise how vulnerable they are until it is too late, but the networks has done nothing wrong, and unless you have insurance to cover the misuse, you'll be left high and dry.

 

Your arguments that you do not call these countries don't help. Until you report the loss, only calls made after you advise them will be their responsibility. Remember, the the if would simply take the dongle SIM and put it in a standard handset to run up the calls. Easy!

 

At more conciliatory approach is a better bet. Asking for any consideration in reducing the debt might just get it lowered a bit to minimize the hardship if you don't have insurance. Going in with guns blazing will not get you far, and cost more in the long run.

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