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Acer Aspire 5536 and the goading to go legal


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I feel i have to share my displeasure at the treatment i have experience, i'd normally say customer service but it was non-existent so i can only categorise it as treatment.

 

I purchased said laptop at the tail end of September 2009 from Currys in Braehead, Glasgow as i needed the laptop for my course work as i'm a student and things started smoothly but gradually have gone on a big slipperly slope. One day the laptop froze and restarted to a black screen advising there was no operating found, i held the power button in and it loaded windows vista no problems so i dismissed it as a one off and maybe the laptop had overheated

 

A few weeks later i upgraded to Windows 7 and things were ok til around a month ago when the same issue happened again and has got to the point where it is happening a couple of times per week. On Sunday it happened and when it restarted the screen appeared scrambled and this carried on for 20 mins of powering on and off, eventually it returned to normal. This i felt i had to deal with asap as its clearly getting worse as i have some very important course work due in the next few weeks and fear that i'll lose work if the fault occurs whilst i'm doing it so i took it back with the aim of getting an exchange as i cannot afford to be without my laptop as at this time of year its a serious inconvenience to any student to be unable to do their coursework.

 

Yesterday evening i had a rather non-eventful attempt of returning to the store and was told in no unnecessary terms that there was "no chance i was leaving the store with an exchange" and was told to call customer services which opened a whole new can of worms.

 

The call to customer services started by me being advised that the store should have dealt with it - a clear pass the buck attempt. Eventually i was passed to the duty manager - a Mr Else - who listened to my explanation and advised me that he would offer me a repair and as the fault i had was intermittent i would have to expect to be without the laptop for the full 28 day period as they would need to replicate it but he was sure it could be repaired eventually. When i explained my predicament about coursework being due in the next couple of weeks and into late march and that being without the laptop was an inconvenience to me and under the sale of goods act i have a right to an exchange if this is the case he informed me that i had to options

 

1. The offer of repair that he had offered me

 

2. That i take Currys to court on a small claims action and that i hope the court sides with me and they award me a replacement or refund

 

this took me a bit by surprise, why would anyone not want to resolve an issue without going to the extreme of court action?

 

I advised him i felt at this juncture that there was no desire on my part to go the lengths of taking them to court and that surely there was other avenues available, i was told again my options and was told "if i dont like it, take us to court". I asked for contact details of a higher level to complain to and was told that the head office wouldn't speak to me and that the only department i could take it up with was Currys litigation department who he was happy to give details of but i would have to get a lawyer/solicitor or barrister to contact as they wouldn't speak to me as i am not qualified to do so, i am a law student so know what i am qualified and not qualified to do and informed him of this at this juncture and he told me he didn't feel i was qualified to deal with them and to get a solicitor to call.

 

I asked him if the call was being recorded - i was informed the call to the first person was, however, the call with him wasn't...convenient. I asked him why he was so adamant that i take them to court when it wasn't necessary and he said "take it to court and you'll find out".

 

i'm now stuck with a laptop that is growing increasingly faulty and as it stands now i am within the 6 month period where i have a decent set of rights under the sale of goods act but fear this dragging on.

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Unfortunately, and whilst I think the for-mentioned Mr Else should consider a lesson in manners, I do agree with the resolution that they have offered. I don't see how it would take 28 days to repair a laptop (Overheating faults I could do in an hour tops... in fact I did last week).

 

The act does state that a repair or replacement must be done within a reasonable amount of time, without significant inconvenience taking into account the type of product. Even though it is a laptop, in respect for retailers I don't see up to 21 days being beyond a reasonable amount of time (28 really is pushing it), remember that the act is there for both retailers and consumers. Just be glad that the Law Commissioners are looking to opt out of some of the new EU consumer directive that is being proposed (No right to instant refund from day one.)

 

Taking that into account I would more push for a courtesy laptop whilst yours is away for repair,

Ex-Retail Manager who is happy to offer helpful advise in many consumer problems based on my retail experience. Any advise I do offer is my opinion and how I understand the law.

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If you're a law student you probably already know this, but:

 

48A Introductory

 

 

(1) This section applies if -

 

 

    (a) the buyer deals as consumer or, in Scotland, there is a consumer contract in which the buyer is a consumer, and
     
    (b) the goods do not conform to the contract of sale at the time of delivery.
     

(2) If this section applies, the buyer has the right -

 

 

 

    (a) under and in accordance with section 48B below, to require the seller to repair or replace the goods, or
     
    (b) under and in accordance with section 48C below -
     
     
      (i) to require the seller to reduce the purchase price of the goods to the buyer by an appropriate amount, or
       
      (ii) to rescind the contract with regard to the goods in question.
       

     

(3) For the purposes of subsection (1)(b) above goods which do not conform to the contract of sale at any time within the period of six months starting with the date on which the goods were delivered to the buyer must be taken not to have so conformed at that date.

 

(4) Subsection (3) above does not apply if -

 

 

 

    (a) it is established that the goods did so conform at that date;
     
    (b) its application is incompatible with the nature of the goods or the nature of the lack of conformity.
     

48B Repair or replacement of the goods

 

 

(1) If section 48A above applies, the buyer may require the seller -

 

 

 

    (a) to repair the goods, or
     
    (b) to replace the goods.
     

(2) If the buyer requires the seller to repair or replace the goods, the seller must -

 

 

 

    (a) repair or, as the case may be, replace the goods within a reasonable time but without causing significant inconvenience to the buyer;
     
    (b) bear any necessary costs incurred in doing so (including in particular the cost of any labour, materials or postage).
     

(3) The buyer must not require the seller to repair or, as the case may be, replace the goods if that remedy is -

 

 

 

    (a) impossible, or
     
    (b) disproportionate in comparison to the other of those remedies, or
     
    © disproportionate in comparison to an appropriate reduction in the purchase price under paragraph (a), or rescission under paragraph (b), of section 48C(1) below.
     

(4) One remedy is disproportionate in comparison to the other if the one imposes costs on the seller which, in comparison to those imposed on him by the other, are unreasonable, taking into account -

 

 

 

    (a) the value which the goods would have if they conformed to the contract of sale,
     
    (b) the significance of the lack of conformity, and
     
    © whether the other remedy could be effected without significant inconvenience to the buyer.
     

(5) Any question as to what is a reasonable time or significant inconvenience is to be determined by reference to -

 

 

    (a) the nature of the goods, and
     
    (b) the purpose for which the goods were acquired.

 

You could argue since the goods were acquired for the purposes of doing your coursework (and although most universities and colleges have computer rooms you need one these days) being without one would cause you too much inconvenience to accept a repair - which it seems you have already done.

 

Just don't communicate by phone. You've tried the store, you've tried the customer services, you should try and put most of your conversations in writing, send a letter to head office by a signed-for service explaining the situation, your rights and the need for a replacement (there are plenty of templates) and see what happens from there - if it doesn't you can file, but all this time you're still without a laptop (looks like the mainboard's failed anyway).

 

As for the 6 month thing, in reality it only affects whether or not the fault is by default considered inherent - once it has been ascertained it is (outside the 6m) or can't be ascertained it is not (inside) the remedies are still the same - unless you can show the goods were not "accepted".

The above post constitutes my personal opinion on the facts in the post compared with my personal knowledge of the applicable legislation. I make no guarantees of its legal accuracy. If you are in doubt seek advice of a legal professional specialising in the area concerned.

 

If my post has helped you please click my scales!

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Unfortunately, and whilst I think the for-mentioned Mr Else should consider a lesson in manners, I do agree with the resolution that they have offered. I don't see how it would take 28 days to repair a laptop (Overheating faults I could do in an hour tops... in fact I did last week).

 

The act does state that a repair or replacement must be done within a reasonable amount of time, without significant inconvenience taking into account the type of product. Even though it is a laptop, in respect for retailers I don't see up to 21 days being beyond a reasonable amount of time (28 really is pushing it), remember that the act is there for both retailers and consumers. Just be glad that the Law Commissioners are looking to opt out of some of the new EU consumer directive that is being proposed (No right to instant refund from day one.)

 

Taking that into account I would more push for a courtesy laptop whilst yours is away for repair,

 

I did ask for a laptop to use whilst i was in store and was advised i should have taken the whateverhappens cover, i was offered this at point of sale and the sales person told me that i had to pay the full year in one go which i couldn't afford which now appears was misinformation.

 

Any other time of the year and i could probably been able to manage sending it away, however, with a few essays due and others about to be given out i can't afford to take the risk that it doesn't come back quickly and is the reason i am looking for the exchange.

 

He said that as the fault appeared to be intermittent that it could take the full period of time as they'd have to see it happen first hand to sort the issue. I asked Mr Else for a replacement to use and was told it was out of the question, i advised him again of the inconvenience and he told me to prove it inconvenienced me and then went back to his take us to court stance which i really have no desire to do as i feel its not necessary at this stage.

 

here are some photo's of the screen when the problems happened

 

img0047hh.jpg

img0057q.jpg

img0047qf.jpg

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If you're a law student you probably already know this, but:

 

 

 

You could argue since the goods were acquired for the purposes of doing your coursework (and although most universities and colleges have computer rooms you need one these days) being without one would cause you too much inconvenience to accept a repair - which it seems you have already done.

 

Just don't communicate by phone. You've tried the store, you've tried the customer services, you should try and put most of your conversations in writing, send a letter to head office by a signed-for service explaining the situation, your rights and the need for a replacement (there are plenty of templates) and see what happens from there - if it doesn't you can file, but all this time you're still without a laptop (looks like the mainboard's failed anyway).

 

As for the 6 month thing, in reality it only affects whether or not the fault is by default considered inherent - once it has been ascertained it is (outside the 6m) or can't be ascertained it is not (inside) the remedies are still the same - unless you can show the goods were not "accepted".

 

Those are the sections i tried to explain over the phone last night and got the lines about taking them to court.

 

There are computer facilities to use on campus, my problem with that is that as a student i need to work around my course so i need to find time to travel the 10 miles to get there to use them and the labs close at 8pm which means after that time i have no access to PC's to finish off the work.

 

The fault has happened on vista and w7 so its hardware related and from looking at google there are numerous reports of the same fault so its something that's not a one off.

 

I sent an email to an address i found on another forum last night for John Browett the CE of DSGi but as yet i've not had a reply and i doubt i'll get one. If i don't get a response from that i'll be going down the recorded delivery written letter route.

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Well, you're already doing the right thing really, so just wait and see what you get back. You had a plausible point about the undue inconvenience.

 

Regarding the pics, the first one is when it's trying to boot into something, it has a (changeable) order where it goes through hard drives, CD drives, network (hence the PXE Agent) looking for an operating system. Normally, this means there's nothing on the hard drive or it can't be detected... usually a fail of the drive itself, but it can be the controller... The 2nd looks like some sort of graphics glitch (and is inside windows because of the circling disc) which could also be some MB issue if the chip is faulty or something. If it's the HD, it's a pretty simple repair, the mainboard is more costly, but they'd probably have spares... if it's *not* the drive, then what's the chance of it happening again (though that also applies to a replacement).

The above post constitutes my personal opinion on the facts in the post compared with my personal knowledge of the applicable legislation. I make no guarantees of its legal accuracy. If you are in doubt seek advice of a legal professional specialising in the area concerned.

 

If my post has helped you please click my scales!

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Well, you're already doing the right thing really, so just wait and see what you get back. You had a plausible point about the undue inconvenience.

 

Regarding the pics, the first one is when it's trying to boot into something, it has a (changeable) order where it goes through hard drives, CD drives, network (hence the PXE Agent) looking for an operating system. Normally, this means there's nothing on the hard drive or it can't be detected... usually a fail of the drive itself, but it can be the controller... The 2nd looks like some sort of graphics glitch (and is inside windows because of the circling disc) which could also be some MB issue if the chip is faulty or something. If it's the HD, it's a pretty simple repair, the mainboard is more costly, but they'd probably have spares... if it's *not* the drive, then what's the chance of it happening again (though that also applies to a replacement).

 

on sunday the second one happened, the first screen came up and as usual i held in the power button and went to restart...instead of the bios and into windows that screen came up and when i tried holding in the button again it kept coming up, i had to end up putting the laptop on my kitchen worktop to cool down as the underside was really hot...usually when the first one happens the fan goes like the clappers and is really noisy then it locks up and the screen goes grey and get (not responding) on the window and then eventually the restart occurs to the OS not found screen

 

having seen other folk have the same problem i don't think a bookie would take a bet on it not happening again

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Not trying to derail the whole process here, but lets assume for the sake of argument he has to send a minimum of two letters to get this sorted. They have 14 days to reply to each one. Wouldn't it just be easier to accept the repair at a maximum of 28 days?

 

I understand the principle of the situation, but realisticaly currys will not relinquish their right to repair the product, no matter how many letters you send them, and threatening legal action will just get you the "get your solicitor to talk to litigation" response and reguardless of what course your studying (no offence btw) but your not a yet a qualified solicitor. Not to mention they will probably just argue that many other students have accepted a repair and used college facilities for the repair period without an issue.

 

The long and short of it is, if conveniance really is an issue here rather than just wanting to get a new laptop, the repair is the more conveniant option because as most regulars to this board know, currys are not going to exchange it until your practicaly at the courtroom door. And by then you could have gone without a laptop for several months.

Edited by Renzokuken

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Not trying to derail the whole process here, but lets assume for the sake of argument he has to send a minimum of two letters to get this sorted. They have 14 days to reply to each one. Wouldn't it just be easier to accept the repair at a maximum of 28 days? I understand the principle of the situation, but realisticaly currys will not relinquish their right to repair the product, no matter how many letters you send them, and threatening legal action will just get you the "get your solicitor to talk to litigation" response and reguardless of what course your studying (no offence btw) but your not a solicitor. Not to mention they will probably just argue that many other students have accepted a repair and used college facilities for the repair period without an issue.

 

Ok, say i do accept the repair and go use the facilities...are currys going to compensate me from being unable to work as i need the money from working to live. I could always handwrite the courseworks, but as they are required in typescript i could hire a typist to type up my written coursework and pass the bill to Currys but i doubt they'd pay that. Other students likely accept the repair as they are not aware of their rights and just accept it.

 

would you be happy to accept a repair if you were in my situation? a laptop just shy of being bought 5 months ago and you need it to carry out work that has a deadline which can have detrimental consequences to your career

 

If i did go down the legal route it could potentially be a very expensive route, i could fail my coursework and in turn not pass my course as this is my final year - they'd then be looking at lost earnings, resit costs, compensation for emotional loss. Also with a small claims action i would be representing myself so i don't see why a solicitor is required to discuss the matter with a litigator as it would be myself they'd come up against - to link back to earlier, if its utterly necessary then they'd have a bill for a solicitor to pay for too - and in a small claim the decision is based on the balance of probabilities and the court would look at the following 2 questions to reach their decision:

 

would leaving the pursuer, a student, without a laptop which is required to carry out their study be of significant inconvenience? - yes

 

would it be of detrimental financial loss to the defenders to replace the laptop? - no, as they'd send it to the manufacturer and claim money back from them

Edited by thatdavieguy
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Ok, say i do accept the repair and go use the facilities...are currys going to compensate me from being unable to work as i need the money from working to live. I could always handwrite the courseworks, but as they are required in typescript i could hire a typist to type up my written coursework and pass the bill to Currys but i doubt they'd pay that. Other students likely accept the repair as they are not aware of their rights and just accept it.

 

would you be happy to accept a repair if you were in my situation? a laptop just shy of being bought 5 months ago and you need it to carry out work that has a deadline which can have detrimental consequences to your career

 

If i did go down the legal route it could potentially be a very expensive route, i could fail my coursework and in turn not pass my course as this is my final year - they'd then be looking at lost earnings, resit costs, compensation for emotional loss. Also with a small claims action i would be representing myself so i don't see why a solicitor is required to discuss the matter with a litigator as it would be myself they'd come up against - to link back to earlier, if its utterly necessary then they'd have a bill for a solicitor to pay for too - and in a small claim the decision is based on the balance of probabilities and the court would look at the following 2 questions to reach their decision:

 

would leaving the pursuer, a student, without a laptop which is required to carry out their study be of significant inconvenience? - yes

 

would it be of detrimental financial loss to the defenders to replace the laptop? - no, as they'd send it to the manufacturer and claim money back from them

 

I'm not looking for an argument, all I'm saying is, right now, you've got a broken laptop, if you give it to currys now, a maximum of 28 days later you'll have a working laptop and can get on with whatever your doing.

 

Go down the litigation route, you'll be stuck with a non-working laptop until you practicaly get to the courtroom door assuming currys choose not to defend. Either way your going to end up with a working laptop, it's just a matter of how long you want to wait. The longer you leave it, the more likely currys will turn around, should it actualy get to court, and say "we offered him a repair months ago and he refused it, we could have had it repaired for him months ago"

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simple ans to this is go get another hardrive reinstall win7.

they are under no obligation to 'pay' for you inco. simple.

whatthey are sayingis true, 28days.

 

dx

please don't hit Quote...just type we know what we said earlier..

DCA's view debtors as suckers, marks and mugs

NO DCA has ANY legal powers whatsoever on ANY debt no matter what it's Type

and they

are NOT and can NEVER  be BAILIFFS. even if a debt has been to court..

If everyone stopped blindly paying DCA's Tomorrow, their industry would collapse overnight... 

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I'm not looking for an argument, all I'm saying is, right now, you've got a broken laptop, if you give it to currys now, a maximum of 28 days later you'll have a working laptop and can get on with whatever your doing.

 

Go down the litigation route, you'll be stuck with a non-working laptop until you practicaly get to the courtroom door assuming currys choose not to defend. Either way your going to end up with a working laptop, it's just a matter of how long you want to wait. The longer you leave it, the more likely currys will turn around, should it actualy get to court, and say "we offered him a repair months ago and he refused it, we could have had it repaired for him months ago"

 

i'm not looking for an argument either, a maximum of 28 days by which time i have 3 courseworks due with no laptop which means i have to either ask for extentions or take the hit on grades...extentions mean i have those to do plus anything assigned during that time which inconveniences me more

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simple ans to this is go get another hardrive reinstall win7.

they are under no obligation to 'pay' for you inco. simple.

whatthey are sayingis true, 28days.

 

dx

 

why should i? i'll then ihave paid £450 for a laptop which i'll have then had to buy a new 500gb HDD for when the laptop is only 5 months old, why should i have to pay out of my own pocket when the sale of goods act states i am legally entitled to a repair/exchange or refund within 6 months as the goods are not fit for purpose and i'm being inconvenienced as i bought the laptop for my course and i can't use it for its purpose.

 

would you be happy to do that?

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the first point yes.

the 2nd point no, it does not state that anywhere in soga.

 

500Gb HDD , yea ok.

 

dx

please don't hit Quote...just type we know what we said earlier..

DCA's view debtors as suckers, marks and mugs

NO DCA has ANY legal powers whatsoever on ANY debt no matter what it's Type

and they

are NOT and can NEVER  be BAILIFFS. even if a debt has been to court..

If everyone stopped blindly paying DCA's Tomorrow, their industry would collapse overnight... 

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blimey so it does!

 

500Gb, now thats prob why its failed,

bet its a toshiba drive!

 

dx

please don't hit Quote...just type we know what we said earlier..

DCA's view debtors as suckers, marks and mugs

NO DCA has ANY legal powers whatsoever on ANY debt no matter what it's Type

and they

are NOT and can NEVER  be BAILIFFS. even if a debt has been to court..

If everyone stopped blindly paying DCA's Tomorrow, their industry would collapse overnight... 

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the first point yes.

the 2nd point no, it does not state that anywhere in soga.

 

500Gb HDD , yea ok.

 

dx

 

have a look at post 3 of this thread at the highlighted sections it does state that in the sale of goods act

 

and yes it does have a 500gb HDD

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i'm not looking for an argument either, a maximum of 28 days by which time i have 3 courseworks due with no laptop which means i have to either ask for extentions or take the hit on grades...extentions mean i have those to do plus anything assigned during that time which inconveniences me more

 

Once again you've missed the point, if you go down the litagation route it's going to take way LONGER than 28 days.

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tbh: i think you will have a hardtime convincing a judge of this.

if it were a freezer and defrosted food involved etc etc then that has worked.

but a laptop, ...urm thats another matter.

 

dx

please don't hit Quote...just type we know what we said earlier..

DCA's view debtors as suckers, marks and mugs

NO DCA has ANY legal powers whatsoever on ANY debt no matter what it's Type

and they

are NOT and can NEVER  be BAILIFFS. even if a debt has been to court..

If everyone stopped blindly paying DCA's Tomorrow, their industry would collapse overnight... 

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Once again you've missed the point, if you go down the litagation route it's going to take way LONGER than 28 days.

 

i'm not, i simply can't afford to send it away and take the risk that it will be gone for the 28 days

 

my legal rights are that i can have it exchanged, currys have to recognise my rights - i'd be happy to send it away if they give me a laptop to use to save me the inconvenience and was told that i couldn't have one

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tbh: i think you will have a hardtime convincing a judge of this.

if it were a freezer and defrosted food involved etc etc then that has worked.

but a laptop, ...urm thats another matter.

 

dx

 

i dont see how, i bought the laptop for the purpose of using it for my course and the work involved in it. It's faulty therefore its not allowing me to use it for that purpose = its not fit for its purpose

 

within 6 months of purchase i have the right to go back to the seller if there is a fault as its seen as an inherent fault that has been there since day 1 and the onus is on the seller to prove the fault is there - i have posted proof of the fault above to show that which i have gone beyond what is required of me. the seller has to offer a remedy (repair/replace or refund) in this case a repair which due to the nature of my purchase is not satisfactory to my needs as i bought the item for my course and by not having it for up to 28 days significantly inconveniences me as it stops me from being able to do my coursework in my free time as i have to work when i am not in lectures.

 

section 48 covers me in these aspects and the seller has to recognise my rights, i have recognised theirs by allowing them to try to resolve the matter and not seek to go straight to court action - i see no reason to at this juncture when they can simply exchange it as going to court will cost them more as they will have to exchange the laptop and pay the costs which will amount to more than the cost of the laptop when i bought it

 

a small claims action is based on the balance of probabilities as i said before they would look at:

 

would leaving a student, who bought the laptop for their course purpose, be a significant inconvenience - yes it would as its now going into the final months of term and approaching exams

 

would there be a financial detriment to the seller by exchanging the laptop - no, they would get recompensed by the manufacturer upon return of the goods in question

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i'm not, i simply can't afford to send it away and take the risk that it will be gone for the 28 days

 

my legal rights are that i can have it exchanged, currys have to recognise my rights - i'd be happy to send it away if they give me a laptop to use to save me the inconvenience and was told that i couldn't have one

 

Ok..

 

Laptop is broken

Send it away for 28 days

-Time without working laptop: 28 days or less-

 

Laptop is broken

Send two letters or more to litigation taking about 14 days per letter. 28 days

handle court proceedings average 30 - 60+ days

-Time without working laptop: 58 - 88 days or more-

 

Your legal rights are you can have it exchanged if it causes significant inconveniance, it's your job to prove that it causes significant inconvenance, and the only way currys will accept that is once you take them to court, which as you can see above leaves you stuck with a broken laptop for two months or more.

Edited by Renzokuken

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no, an inherent fault is one regonised by the manu, to cause multiples of the same item to fail, then its a direct replacement & there is no time limit, it could be 6yrs, if that is as loing as the unit would be 'resonably' expected to last.

sadly HDD's fail, esp 500Gb laptop ones. butthats not the laptop makers problem,

 

now, we are all ofcourse being rather unfair to 'whomever' at curry might carry this workout.

if it were me, and i knew a punter with a screwed hdd was coming in, i'd get it ready and could swop it in

 

you can argue all you like, but a U/S laptop is not going to get you any compensation.

 

oh and another point. have you had the fault varified by an independent eng? if not, you'll need to do that first.

 

dx

please don't hit Quote...just type we know what we said earlier..

DCA's view debtors as suckers, marks and mugs

NO DCA has ANY legal powers whatsoever on ANY debt no matter what it's Type

and they

are NOT and can NEVER  be BAILIFFS. even if a debt has been to court..

If everyone stopped blindly paying DCA's Tomorrow, their industry would collapse overnight... 

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With regards to the length of time to take a small claims action, according to my local sheriff court the earliest date they could give me is early April, and in the mean time I could communicate with any departments within Currys as is necessary, litigation or otherwise.

 

An inherent fault is ANY fault with an item which has always been there, your referring to a manufacturing defect which then would cause product recalls, this is not what I'm talking about.

 

Q1. What is an inherent fault?A fault present at the time of purchase. Examples are:

• an error in design so that a product is manufactured incorrectly

• an error in manufacturing where a faulty component was inserted.

The "fault" may not become apparent immediately but it was there at the time of sale and so the product was not of satisfactory standard.

 

Sale of Goods Act Fact Sheet - BIS

 

Taken from the above website, a government website fact sheet about the Sale of Goods Act.

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At the end of the day, Curries are doing everything they legally have to do, there is no other way to force them to do it quicker, provide you with a replacement or courtesy laptop.

 

Its at an impasse, it might be worth trying to borrow a laptop off somewhere else friend/family and have it repaired. As it has been highlighted above its going to take a lot longer down the litigation route.

Ex-Retail Manager who is happy to offer helpful advise in many consumer problems based on my retail experience. Any advise I do offer is my opinion and how I understand the law.

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At the end of the day, Curries are doing everything they legally have to do, there is no other way to force them to do it quicker, provide you with a replacement or courtesy laptop.

 

Its at an impasse, it might be worth trying to borrow a laptop off somewhere else friend/family and have it repaired. As it has been highlighted above its going to take a lot longer down the litigation route.

 

they have an obligation to offer a resolution - they offered the repair which is not suitable and i am exercising my right to an exchange as per SOGA

 

why should i have to inconvenience a family member by taking their laptop or computer? i could realisitically be without a laptop for the 28 days and that would mean it's not just me thats being inconvenienced

 

i'm not being difficult or chancing my arm, i'm being realistic here - why should i forgo my legal rights just to suit a massive retailer, if we just roll over and accept what they want we might as well just give up our consumer rights and accept any old rubbish that retailers throw at us

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