Jump to content


DHL Smashed my goods- not our fault


style="text-align: center;">  

Thread Locked

because no one has posted on it for the last 4149 days.

If you need to add something to this thread then

 

Please click the "Report " link

 

at the bottom of one of the posts.

 

If you want to post a new story then

Please

Start your own new thread

That way you will attract more attention to your story and get more visitors and more help 

 

Thanks

Recommended Posts

i may be going back a bit but last year DHL took my sink basin to be delivered to a nice lady in London. Yes they dropped it and smashed it, it was in the original packaging from the supplier in Europe.

Dhl said not our fault because packaging was not up to standard.

Whos standard it came across Europe to me in leeds via a company in lancashire. all they had to do was get it to London.Dhl would not accept any fault on their part.BB""""""""""DS.

DO NOT USE DHL THEY ARE [email protected]

Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry, but you do not have any grounds for compensation.

 

It is reasonable to assume that a certain amount of knocking about will happen in their care, and it is your responsibility to ensure that it is properly packaged.

 

Kind regards,

Link to post
Share on other sites

yes i was intouch with them as soon as it was returned to me .... within 2 minutes.

 

sneakisms dont be so stupid,,,

an item comes by carrier across europe no problem!

yorkshire to london by dhl problem?

Link to post
Share on other sites
sneakisms dont be so stupid,,,

an item comes by carrier across europe no problem!

yorkshire to london by dhl problem?

 

sneaksms is correct. It doesn't matter how it's been transported previously - if something is being sent with a courier you need to ensure it is adequately packaged to avoid any damage. If it's been damaged then the most likely explanation is that it wasn't packaged sufficiently.

 

Out of interest, how was the item packaged?

Opinions given herein are made informally by myself as a lay-person in good faith based on personal experience. For legal advice you must always consult a registered and insured lawyer.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Have since risked sending out another by a local courier, one big result - no problems.

Only problem i have now is they keep pestering me for more work.

Should have used them 1st.

I guess its better to stick with a local small company they care more.

Link to post
Share on other sites
but correct :rolleyes:

correct how?

 

The item was sufficiently packaged for transport.

 

Surely the fact that it'd managed transport across europe is pretty much empirical evidence of this!

 

 

unless you're saying everything should be sent in a fireproof water and chemical resistant safe. (just in case it's dropped/driven over/emmersed in water etc)...

Link to post
Share on other sites
The item was sufficiently packaged for transport.

 

Surely the fact that it'd managed transport across europe is pretty much empirical evidence of this!

 

Not necessarily.

 

How was the item packaged?

Opinions given herein are made informally by myself as a lay-person in good faith based on personal experience. For legal advice you must always consult a registered and insured lawyer.

Link to post
Share on other sites
correct how?

 

The item was sufficiently packaged for transport.

 

Surely the fact that it'd managed transport across europe is pretty much empirical evidence of this!

 

Correct because it's broken...

 

Imagine sending a Fabergé egg in a Jiffy bag from Sydney to London, it makes it all the way to our shores intact, but the post office dares to put it in with a post bag with other jiffy bags and it breaks - would you consider it properly packed because it lasted most of the journey? Probably not.

 

unless you're saying everything should be sent in a fireproof water and chemical resistant safe. (just in case it's dropped/driven over/emmersed in water etc)...

 

Would you expect a package to bet set alight, dunked in the Thames and immersed in caustic soda? No.

 

Could you expect that at some point in the process of handling many thousands of packages it would be dropped a little? Yes.

 

If you'd paid £hundreds to get it couriered on its own on a feather cushion and it broke, you'd have a claim.

 

UNLESS of course there's evidence that it had been dropped from some height.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Correct because it's broken...

 

Imagine sending a Fabergé egg in a Jiffy bag from Sydney to London, it makes it all the way to our shores intact, but the post office dares to put it in with a post bag with other jiffy bags and it breaks - would you consider it properly packed because it lasted most of the journey? Probably not.

 

 

 

Would you expect a package to bet set alight, dunked in the Thames and immersed in caustic soda? No.

 

Could you expect that at some point in the process of handling many thousands of packages it would be dropped a little? Yes.

 

If you'd paid £hundreds to get it couriered on its own on a feather cushion and it broke, you'd have a claim.

 

UNLESS of course there's evidence that it had been dropped from some height.

the OP managed to get it couriered from across Europe to the north of England, one would assume that this is what is required of a courier service, not that the original courier was paid thousands to transport the basin on a feather pillow. -I don't know I assume not

 

and I would expect that the basin was put into the back of a lorry and was transported in a normal fashion with other goods being couriered at the time.

 

and that it was packaged well enough to manage a journey over both land and sea.

 

yet the same packaging was not good enough to get it to London?

 

sounds more like the courier was careless, and have dropped something which it would be reasonable to assume was packaged well enough, since it already managed to be couriered hundreds of miles in the same packaging...

 

as for saying don't I expect that it'd be dropped a bit?

 

absolutely not, I'd agree that you'd expect it to rattle around a little in a van/lorry, but being dropped absolutely not, I'd say that's careless.

 

 

the point of my post above was that no, I wouldn't expect my package to endure fire water and chemical attack, but I'd also expect that my package wouldn't be dropped from any significant height, and that my package would be sufficiently secure in transit so that it didn't rattle around on it's own in the back on an HGV...

 

 

Perhaps if the OP could say how it was packaged?

 

in any case, I'd still believe that the OP should have their claim against DHL's insurance upheld, DHL don't offer guidance on how to package your items, nor do they say that they will be exceptionally careless and drop the item from height! and as I said, and the OP said, the packaging was good enough to ship the item, it's already been shipped once over a much greater distance with no issues what-so-ever.

 

 

note that the post subject is DHL SMASHED my goods, not that they were chipped, or cracked, but actually smashed, so it's either been dropped, thrown, or something has fallen on it and crushed it. all of these would show massive negligence by the courier.

Link to post
Share on other sites
sounds more like the courier was careless, and have dropped something which it would be reasonable to assume was packaged well enough, since it already managed to be couriered hundreds of miles in the same packaging...

 

I think it would be wrong to make such an assumption. Just because a package has made it from A to B doesn't mean it will make it from B to C.

 

To give you an actual example - many energy suppliers send out free energy saving lightbulbs to their customer - which is just a lightbulb (or a number of lightbulbs) in a box. They take no effort to protect the bulb whatsoever - it's all a numbers game, they know that the majority of bulbs will get their without being damaged and it's not economically viable to invest in more robust packaging just to protect the few that get damaged. Just because the lightbulb gets to you in one piece - if you send it on to somebody else that does not mean that it was packed correctly. (Appreciate this is a little different but just wanted to illustrate the point)

 

 

Perhaps if the OP could say how it was packaged?
Indeed. It may have been packaged well, but unless we know how it was packaged, we can't comment either way.

Opinions given herein are made informally by myself as a lay-person in good faith based on personal experience. For legal advice you must always consult a registered and insured lawyer.

Link to post
Share on other sites

specially packed in heavy cardboard, several layers, as you would expect a pocelain basin would be.

come on now peeps leave it , life goes on.

i was just making a statement

DONT USE DHL THEY ARE CRAP AND THEIR AFTERSALES IS EVEN WORSE..

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi, I had to start court procedures against DHL a little while ago.

Sent a computer via them, they decided to play football with it, Smashed the contents and the box, left it in the customers garden and said the customer signed for it in good condition!

But they had put a card through the customers door saying they had left it in the garden.

At first I had the same trouble as above but once I produced the 'left' card and started the court process they backed down and paid my expenses.

I send a lot of computers and other IT equipment over the Uk and further and have only ever had trouble with DHL.

Link to post
Share on other sites

The sink was most likely transported from its manufacturer to the UK with many other sinks in a container or lorry especially commissioned for that journey to reduce handling for obvious reasons.

 

The packaging you refer to is NOT designed for individual transportation and especially not through the courier system! It is designed to prevent damage when stacked with other identical units and to make that stacking easier.

 

Sending a porcelain sink through DHL using the bare carboard packaging it is stored in at the warehouse is nothing short of inept. It should have been extensively wrapped in polystyrene and bubblewrap so it could be dropped from 6ft without breaking. Then and only then would it be suitable.

 

Lets look at Eggs. They are also in cardboard boxes. They make it from their farm in Poland to Tesco's fine. So why not send them to Auntie Alice in Cornwall by DHL too? Because they WILL get broken.

 

Whilst this site is here to offer advice for hard done by consumers, this is simply ridiculous and anyone who thinks a bit of cardboard will protect a porcelain sink being slung in and out of vans by DHL needs to learn from thier mistake and move on rather than slating a the company on a public forum, which could result in libel by said company!

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 weeks later...

Having worked as a multi drop driver, and having witnessed parcel depots working, you have to accept that the parcels may get dropped etc, its your job to make sure they're packaged securely, it was my job to make sure they reached their destination. I treated the parcels carefully as best as I could, although I couldn't vouch for the 20 or so other people that may have handled your parcel on its journey. It is worth bearing in mind though, that multi drop drivers have a fair bit of stress. My route was reasonably large, covering up to 250kms a day, anything up to 60 drops, and 5 collection, with a good hours drive from the depot before I started my round. I didnt work for DHL, although I have done in the past for an agency, but they dont have the nickname Drop it, Hurl it, Lose it, for no reason.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Recently Browsing   0 Caggers

    No registered users viewing this page.


  • Have we helped you ...?


×
×
  • Create New...