Jump to content


Wireless Access to Broadband


style="text-align: center;">  

Thread Locked

because no one has posted on it for the last 4323 days.

If you need to add something to this thread then

 

Please click the "Report " link

 

at the bottom of one of the posts.

 

If you want to post a new story then

Please

Start your own new thread

That way you will attract more attention to your story and get more visitors and more help 

 

Thanks

Recommended Posts

I am a customer with BT, been happy with them and into my 3rd year, I originally had a contract for 'unlimited' downloads, then in December decided that as my children where not often home and using their computers that I could downgrade to a 10megs/gig download package, lovely I thought, saving money at last!! :)

Everything was going fine until May when BT informed me that I had over used the downloads, but as it was the first time they would not charge me. I recently recieved an email from BT saying that our use for the month of July was a staggering 85 megs/gigs! I checked everything out, but a not very helpful BT could not tell me what I'd been downloading or when. I had noticed that my laptop and the hub seemed to be running slowly, so contacted BT Technical Services. They were as helpful as they could be and during the conversation I told the 'Techie' about the sudden increase in useage and when I told him how much I'd used he whistled. He told me that he would check my wireless connection and eventually turned it off, telling me that he understood why I had used the 85 megs/gigs, someone had hacked into my wireless signal.

On contacting BT they said that there was no evidence of that and we would have to pay, our usage for August had already exceeded 30megs/gigs, so I have had to change to unlimited again or face a big bill again. BT say thay can do nothing, the police say they can do nothing!!!!

I have asked BT to supply me with details of downloads, times and I.P addresses that accessed and recieved downloads from my line, they say they can't.

Can anyone tell me what I can possibly do to resolve this issue?

I will probably change internet provider, so anyone know of a good secure wireless system or alternatively a way to use my BT wireless without it being high jacked.

 

Thank you for any assistance.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes I had a 'key' in place, not sure what encryption level was used, I'm not a 'techie' by any stretch of the imagination, so wouldn't even know where to look for the information.

I have researched the issue of accessing a broadband wireless signal and have to say it appears easy if you have the right equipement. BT say it must be someone close by as the wireless signal is only good for up to fifty metres on a good day.

I do know that 85megs/gigs whatever is a great deal of information, having spoken to a guy who knows more than I do, but then thats not too difficult!! LOL

Link to post
Share on other sites

I think hacking in is quite widespread - and know schoolkids are doing it.

 

I have a friend who doesn't know anything about internet/PC's at all - she told me they didn't have any internet access at their home. I was somewhat baffled as I'd seen her 16 year old sitting on the doorstep using Facebook on his laptop!

 

Turned out he had a piece of equipment that enabled him to hack into the neighbours broadband but it only worked when he was sat on the doorstep or in the front bedroom window!! His mother was horrified and she immediately stopped it. He had actually got the equipment from someone at school.

 

My dad has had someone hack into his TalkTalk as well.

 

I'm lucky as I have mobile broadband that works well.

Link to post
Share on other sites

In your first post, you say that your laptop was slow - was this in general or just on web pages? Have you done virus and malware scans?

 

I have asked BT to supply me with details of downloads, times and I.P addresses that accessed and recieved downloads from my line, they say they can't.

Unfortunately, the only IP that BT will "see" will be the external one given to your home hub. The internal addresses are masked by this external one.

 

As for them knowing what was downloaded and when, ISPs now have to maintain records of the sites you visit and when. BT are also likely to have trafficc graphs that would show when the line was being used. Unfortunately, BT will not want to release this as it means more work for them.

 

However, the homehubs do list all clients that have recently been connected to them. So it might be worth a look.

 

 

Yes I had a 'key' in place, not sure what encryption level was used, I'm not a 'techie' by any stretch of the imagination, so wouldn't even know where to look for the information.

I have researched the issue of accessing a broadband wireless signal and have to say it appears easy if you have the right equipement. BT say it must be someone close by as the wireless signal is only good for up to fifty metres on a good day.

I do know that 85megs/gigs whatever is a great deal of information, having spoken to a guy who knows more than I do, but then thats not too difficult!! LOL

85 Giga Bytes (gig) a month is quite a large amount. However only a small constant usage (about 0.3 Mega Bits per Second 24 hrs a day every day) is enough to generate that amount. Do you leave any computers on all the time with something like Skype, BBC iPlayer, Windows Live Messenger, Yahoo messenger or an E-Mail client running? or a games console (x-Box with Live, Wii, etc.)?

 

 

Were you using the default wireless key supplied with the Home Hub? The sticker on the back of the home hub should tell you what version it is and what type of encryption it uses (WEP or WPA)

 

I ask because the BT Home Hubs come with a pre-defined key that is generated based on the default wireless network name(a.k.a. SSID) (BTHomeHub-ABCD). From the final 4 characters of the name, a person with a certain spreadsheet that is freely available can look up a list of one or more possible default keys.

 

From this, it is a short bout of trial and error in finding the correct key from the list and bam, instant connection.

 

 

As for the 50m limit, BT are talking tosh to be blunt. With "Standard" kit, I have maintained a useable connection at 100+ M in a built up area. With igher gain antennas, I have been able to connect to a network in a built up area over 200M away.

 

 

The most "secure" way to connect to the internet is by a cable. However, if you have/want to use wireless, then I would advise that you configure the following on your home hub:

Change the SSID (network name) to something non-standard

Turn off SSID broadcast (hide the network name)

Enable WPA2-Personal (might be WPA2-Pre Shared Key dependant on actual router) encryption, or WPA if WPA2 is not available, and use a complex key - e.g. use letters, numbers and uppercase. Try using a pass-phrase instead of a pass-word.

The Hub should be fairly easy to navigate to set this up. If you need any help, if you can post the home hub version, I might be able to write you dsome fairly detailed instructions. You will need to reconfigure your laptop to connect to the new settings.

 

 

 

I think hacking in is quite widespread - and know schoolkids are doing it.

 

I have a friend who doesn't know anything about internet/PC's at all - she told me they didn't have any internet access at their home. I was somewhat baffled as I'd seen her 16 year old sitting on the doorstep using Facebook on his laptop!

 

Turned out he had a piece of equipment that enabled him to hack into the neighbours broadband but it only worked when he was sat on the doorstep or in the front bedroom window!! His mother was horrified and she immediately stopped it. He had actually got the equipment from someone at school.

 

My dad has had someone hack into his TalkTalk as well.

 

I'm lucky as I have mobile broadband that works well.

More likely to be software. Anyone with a computer that has a wireless card can load up some freely available software and start trying to crack into wireless networks.

 

TalkTalk, BT and a few others that have serialised names generate the default encryption key from the partial serial in the name. There are pre-made spreadsheets out there that make the "hacking" more of a lookup task.

 

Even WPA can be cracked in a matter of minutes, MAC address lock down can be circumvented easily and hiding the SSID doesn't do much either. If someone is really determined, they will generally find a way into a personal wireless network (Enterprise class networks are different)

 

Ultimately, the aim of the game is to make your network the hardest to get into in the area. Most "hackers" are oportunists or so-called script kiddies, if it takes more than 10 mins to get into, or there are easier networks to break into than, your network they will likely go elsewhere.

 

 

 

Sorry it's so long - i'll get my coat and go back to the world of being a Systems Administrator :smile::p

 

Thanks,

H

  • Haha 1

I am not a lawyer - I'm an Engineer with an interest in law. Advice is given with out prejudice and is my opinion on the information I have been provided with based on my experience, understanding and interpritation of law. If you are in any doubt please seek the advice of a qualified and insured legal professional.

 

Victories:

Abbey (OH) - £680 ..... Barclaycard (OH) - £2200 ..... MBNA (OH) - £1800 ..... Shop Direct (OH) - £220

Brunell Franklin (a.k.a. Conkers) - Out of "contract" & no charge

:D

 

In Progress:

MBNA (OH) - PPI & bad default with premature termination

Capital One (OH) - ~£800 Penalty Charges

Suzuki Finance/Blackhorse (OH) - Commission, Unlawful removal, PPI, Charges

 

A Lightbulb Shop - "loss of bargain"

 

If i've helped, please feel free to hit the star ;)

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Recently Browsing   0 Caggers

    No registered users viewing this page.


  • Have we helped you ...?


×
×
  • Create New...