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*Twinkle*

How long must is a fridge freezer covered for under the sales of ggods act?

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Hi All,

 

My Mum bought a new fridge freezer from Curry's in July 06 for £249.95. She does not have extended warranty on it and it has just stopped working, neither the fridge or freezer are getting cold.

 

My question is, who decides whether a product is of satisfactory quality or fit for its purpose and where can we go from here?

 

Thanks in Advance,

 

Twinkle :D

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I meant goods not ggods

Edited by *Twinkle*
can't spell!

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A reasonable length of time.

 

Sorry, but that's the shor and curlies of it. There is no definition of that, nor could there be really.

 

In terms of who decides what is reasonable, it is the court. You need to get evidence to show that you expected it to last more than 3 years. Price, how described, quality etc will all play a factor. You could also get an independant report, and if you are successful, claim the cost back.


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For something that has worked flawlessly every day for nearly 1000 days, I'm assuming there has been no maintenance in that period? To succeed under SoGA you would have to prove there was an inherent fault with the design or operation of the appliance, and from whay uoi describe this wasn;t an issue.

 

An extended warranty would have provided this peace of mind for an additional fee (up to 5 years) and with hindsight, this might have been a cost-effective option.

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To succeed under SoGA you would have to prove there was an inherent fault with the design or operation of the appliance,

OR that the goods were not of satisfactory quality as regards price paid/brand/life expectancy, which is quite obviously what OP would have to rely on in this instance. :rolleyes:

 

 

An extended warranty would have provided this peace of mind for an additional fee (up to 5 years) and with hindsight, this might have been a cost-effective option.
Thus speaks someone intent on seeing statutory rights eroded further and further. :-(

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An extended warranty would have provided this peace of mind for an additional fee (up to 5 years) and with hindsight, this might have been a cost-effective option.

I've always taken the view that if a retailer or manufacturer is prepared to offer an extended warranty on a product, then by inference, the period of what is the expected reasonable lifetime must be at least equal to - but more likely a lot greater than - the offer of extended warranty.

 

Or to put it another way, the seller is banking on you not claiming from the warranty and hence pocketing the cost of an extended warranty - therefore, in order to offer the extended warranty in the first instance, he must have confidence that the product will outlast his commitment. Simple economics of risk.


Disclaimer...

All advice, information, views, opinions or statements, etc. offered by '
Turtle1000
' is taken at a readers 'own risk & responsibility' and 'Without Prejudice'.

 

Should a reader wish to undertake action following advice, information, views, opinions or statements, etc. by '
Turtle1000
', it is recommended that full & proper legal consulation be first made before any implimentation or undertakings.

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Thus speaks someone intent on seeing statutory rights eroded further and further. :-(

 

Hmm - that's right, insurance is evil and you should never contemplate it. Do explain how 'statutory rights' are worth a fig if the people invoved in the chain refuse to comply. Tell Trading Standards? Gordon Brown? Kermit the Frog?

 

We lve in an age where we are told we have 'rights' but not the ability to enforce them (except at out own cost). So keep fooling yourself that it amounts to something, because unless you are going to fund it and use it as part of your legal action, it might as well be written on candy floss.

 

Further, whilst I enjoy your ongoing tantrums, general rudeness and the like, I bet you bore the pants off everyone else. :-|

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Hmm - that's right, insurance is evil and you should never contemplate it. Do explain how 'statutory rights' are worth a fig if the people invoved in the chain refuse to comply. Tell Trading Standards? Gordon Brown? Kermit the Frog?

 

We lve in an age where we are told we have 'rights' but not the ability to enforce them (except at out own cost). So keep fooling yourself that it amounts to something, because unless you are going to fund it and use it as part of your legal action, it might as well be written on candy floss.

 

Further, whilst I enjoy your ongoing tantrums, general rudeness and the like, I bet you bore the pants off everyone else. :-|

I'm with Bookworm... if people don't defend their rights, then retailers will continue to ignore them. Which places the power straight at the retailer and not at the consumer, which is in deference of the point of this forum!


The above post constitutes my personal opinion on the facts in the post compared with my personal knowledge of the applicable legislation. I make no guarantees of its legal accuracy. If you are in doubt seek advice of a legal professional specialising in the area concerned.

 

If my post has helped you please click my scales!

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When an extended warranty can almost double the price of the item it is NOT good value.

 

That argument aside a fridge should last longer than this has & whilst I do think you have case for some compensation you will have to expect that you will not receive full reimbursement as fair wear & tear will be taken into account

 

PS Buzby our fridge/freezer has been working perfectly since 2000 & it ain't an expensive one:p

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I've always taken the view that if a retailer or manufacturer is prepared to offer an extended warranty on a product, then by inference, the period of what is the expected reasonable lifetime must be at least equal to - but more likely a lot greater than - the offer of extended warranty.

 

Or to put it another way, the seller is banking on you not claiming from the warranty and hence pocketing the cost of an extended warranty - therefore, in order to offer the extended warranty in the first instance, he must have confidence that the product will outlast his commitment. Simple economics of risk.

 

 

Quite right they don't offer an extended warranty because they think it will fail they offer an extended warranty because the think it won't which must mean they have determined the life of the fridge to be at least the same if not greater than the term of the warranty

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Thanks for all your replies!

 

A miracle has happened, in frustration my Mum give it a clout on the side (in line with manufacturers guidelines of course! ;)) and it just started working again!!

 

She's going to get someone out to look at it anyway in case it happens again!!

 

Twinkle :D

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Hmm - that's right, insurance is evil and you should never contemplate it. Do explain how 'statutory rights' are worth a fig if the people invoved in the chain refuse to comply. Tell Trading Standards? Gordon Brown? Kermit the Frog?

 

We lve in an age where we are told we have 'rights' but not the ability to enforce them (except at out own cost). So keep fooling yourself that it amounts to something, because unless you are going to fund it and use it as part of your legal action, it might as well be written on candy floss.

Thank you for confirming my earlier comment:Thus speaks someone intent on seeing statutory rights eroded further and further.

 

Further, whilst I enjoy your ongoing tantrums, general rudeness and the like, I bet you bore the pants off everyone else. :-|

Awww bless. :-D

pram.jpg

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Oh FFS.

 

I'm sick and tired of repeating myself about this subject (and I refer to the posts by Buzby, Turtle and Forest).

 

I read a statement during my research for my dissertation, which went:

"Consumer education is largely a wasted effort"

 

I'm beginning to truly believe it. And it faults do not lie with consumers or traders - it's the whole damned bloody system. And trying to explain that, as I have attempted once on this forum to much admonishment, is not a good idea on a forum.

 

I despair.


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Oh FFS.

 

I'm sick and tired of repeating myself about this subject (and I refer to the posts by Buzby, Turtle and Forest).

Bad day gyzmo :?

 

I would love to know exactly what offended you in my post above. In no way did it allude to there being a set or defined reasonable length of time, merely speculated as to what could be used as a guide thus enabling some form of evidence to present to a court.

 

If you were insinuating my support of extended warranties in-lieu of consumer rights, then I am afraid you would be gravely mistaken.

 

I read a statement during my research for my dissertation, which went:

"Consumer education is largely a wasted effort"

If I have missed the point, please 'educate', I for one will listen to your efforts.

 

I'm beginning to truly believe it. And it faults do not lie with consumers or traders - it's the whole damned bloody system. And trying to explain that, as I have attempted once on this forum to much admonishment, is not a good idea on a forum.

 

I despair.

Try not to loose faith. (in the consumer, not the system - thats shot to hell ;))

Disclaimer...

All advice, information, views, opinions or statements, etc. offered by '
Turtle1000
' is taken at a readers 'own risk & responsibility' and 'Without Prejudice'.

 

Should a reader wish to undertake action following advice, information, views, opinions or statements, etc. by '
Turtle1000
', it is recommended that full & proper legal consulation be first made before any implimentation or undertakings.

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1. consumer education is poor, and a little knowledge can be dangerous. This reflects on companies who often are not trying to avoid rights, they just don't understand them themselves as they are really only consumers themselves.

2. extended warranties are a con.

3. you have excellent rights but it can take time to understand them and substantial effort to claim them.

 

Not sure what the solutions are to 1 & 3.

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Stop providing 2 as an expensive replacement to 1 & 3, and come down heavily on companies which keep on promoting 2 and deny 1 & 3? ;-)

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1. consumer education is poor, and a little knowledge can be dangerous. This reflects on companies who often are not trying to avoid rights, they just don't understand them themselves as they are really only consumers themselves.

2. extended warranties are a con.

3. you have excellent rights but it can take time to understand them and substantial effort to claim them.

 

Not sure what the solutions are to 1 & 3.

 

Oh so right

 

Though we may try we'll never be able to protect the some I'm afraid cos anyone who today has no inkling of their rights either lives in a cave or is stupid

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2 a con? Never, it is a consimer choice! At least it is being clarified as to what it is, an insurance policy and not an 'extended guarantee'. You work out whether the term offer (deducting the year you get free anyway) and work out if you think the fee to be paid is worth the price. Ofent it isn;t, but with some kit, it can be an excellent hedge against future ails, especially if you have a machine that makes it successfully to the end of its initial coverage without a problem, THEN stat's to exhibit problems.

 

My personal choice is to find out what the policy would cost, and self-insure myself, putting the same amount of money away in a savings account, one that will fund the repairs if and when required. That way, you've got the money to pay for it, and if you don't need to pay out - you're quids in.

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