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Hi,

I live in a house with 5 other people. I have a tenancy agreement that basically covers my room (it has a lock on the door and I each member of the household has a separate tenancy agreement). If one of my flatmates caused ballifs to come over would they be able to come into my room and start levying my stuff?

 

I brought this discussion up with my flatmates last night and they seemed pretty sure that each persons room sort of counts as a 'mini-property' and that they couldn't come in.

 

Thank you for your time.

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Guest Happy Contrails

FWIW. In 2006 we had a flat in a converted victorian building we bought for use as an overnight crashpad for our airport stopovers, we are airline crew. It was visited by a bailiff who entered via an unlocked fire escape. He then forced open our backdoor to gain entry and was arrested for breaking & entering. The bailiff argued in his police interview that a certificated bailiff can break open internal doors once gaining peaceful entry to the building without using violence or criminal damage. The legal position at the time was the property was self contained and is a separatetely taxed accommodation and the bailiff was not entitled to break open any doors after gaining entry to the communal area of the building. If the accommodation had been a single dwellinghouse with individually lockable bedrooms having a single council tax account with shared kitchen & bathroom etc (seek advice on what constitutes a HMO - a House with Multiple Occupancy) then a bailiff can break open the internal doors to gain access to goods. The bailiff is still responsible for determining the identity of his debtor, so just say his debtor does not live there and ask him to leave quietly.

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Thank you very much for your reply. I'll keep that in mind.

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