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Found 16 results

  1. Bank account holders who are tricked into transferring money to fraudsters could be entitled to reimbursement if they have acted with the "requisite level of care" under proposed new rules. Latest figures show consumers lost £92.9m to authorised push payment (APP) sc@ms in the first half of 2018 - but unlike victims of other types of fraud such as credit or debit card [problem]s they are currently not entitled to be repaid by payment providers. A body set up to address the issue has now proposed changing this, though it has yet to resolve who will pay for the compensation in cases wh
  2. Sexual abuse of cadets 'was covered up by officials who urged victims not to tell police' READ MORE HERE: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/07/04/sexual-abuse-cadets-covered-officials-urged-victims-not-tell/
  3. Britain’s most senior police officer has been accused of attempting to shift blame on to victims of online fraud after he suggested consumers should not be refunded by banks if they fail to protect themselves from cybercrime. Sir Bernard Hogan-Howe, the Metropolitan police commissioner, said customers who had fallen foul of online fraudsters were being “rewarded for bad behaviour” instead of incentivised to update anti-virus software and improve passwords. His comments in the Times come as police brace themselves for an expected surge in overall crime figures when cybercrim
  4. Hello, in the last few days have I discovered that Vanquis Credit Card company are [problem]mers. I already have credit cards with Barclays and Capital One, and manage them perfectly well, am not in debt to them. I apologise, here, for the length of this post. In June this year, I received (junk mail....) an envelope from Vanquis, offering me a credit card with them. Because I was in need of a bit more cash at the time, I stupidly filled in the online application form, and then received a phone-call from them. They approved me for one of their cards. I did NOT then know
  5. Banks are refusing to pay compensation to card fraud victims based on nothing more than a "hunch", while others are forced to wait longer than four weeks to get their money back. An investigation by Which? showed that banks are “inconsistent” when it comes to handling fraud claims. Worryingly, banks appear to be refusing compensation to genuine fraud victims. The FOS said that while it had seen some improvements, in many cases banks have based their decisions “on a hunch”, without conducting a full investigation. http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/personalfinance/b
  6. Just saw this on the news... An accident on the M9 was reported on Sunday 5th July - Police failed to investigate until yesterday, 8th July. They found two people, one dead, one critically injured (and who has since been placed in an induced coma). The couple had already been reported missing, so you would have thought the Police would have clicked when whoever reported the accident advised it was the same vehicle the missing couple had been using !!
  7. http://www.bournemouthecho.co.uk/news/11451963.Police_tell_crime_victims_to_carry_out_their_own_investigations__watchdog_says/?ref=rss
  8. The Royal Bank of Scotland and NatWest are offering borrowers a three-month mortgage repayment holiday for people affected by the floods. The bank will also send specialist business support teams to affected areas to help small and medium-sized businesses with short-term financial problems, to help them as they carry out urgent repair work and deal with loss of trading income. More: http://www.mortgagestrategy.co.uk/news-and-analysis/mortgages/rbs-offers-flood-victims-three-month-mortgage-holiday/2006568.article
  9. http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b006mg74/features/wonga-fraud-complaints-continue
  10. At least 1,400 soldiers have received unfair sanctions, including dismissal and missed promotion, because the Army spent several years wrongly disciplining anyone who received a police caution. Minutes and briefing notes from two Army Justice Board meetings show that the Adjutant-General, the Army’s most senior personnel officer, knew as early as 2011 of the problem, which is related to changes in the law on rehabilitating offenders. It is unclear, however, whether those affected by the mistake have been informed that potentially career-ending penalties should not have been enfor
  11. From today many more criminals will be made to pay towards supporting victims of crime. Currently offenders only contribute around one sixth of the funding that supports victims’ services. Hard-working taxpayers provide the rest. In a massive overhaul to the way services for victims and witnesses of crime are funded, the 'Victim Surcharge' is being increased and extended to apply to a far wider range of sentences. Extending the 'Victim Surcharge' is the next step in the Government's drive to see offenders provide up to £50 million more each year for victims services. This is on top of
  12. http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-northern-ireland-19432497
  13. Victims are seeing their bank accounts emptied after fraudsters set up fake accounts to take out Wonga loans and use stolen card details to push the debt onto unsuspecting consumers, a This is Money investigation has found. In a series of cases raising concerns about the payday lender's security checks, the first victims know is when they notice that money has been taken out of their account by Wonga. When they call their banks to report the crime they are told to contact the payday lender directly, yet those who have come to This is Money for help have typically found it to be slow to
  14. Judge criticises Farepak's bank HBOS for continuing to collect deposits after it knew Christmas savings club was in trouble. Savers who lost money when the hamper firm Farepak collapsed are to receive compensation totalling £8m from Lloyds Banking Group. More than 116,000 families lost money when the firm – which offered consumers the opportunity to spread the cost of Christmas by making regular payments which were converted into vouchers or hampers – went into administration in 2006, wiping out almost £40m in the process Farepak's bank HBOS, which is now part of the Lloyds Banking group,
  15. The losses of £37million incurred by the 116,000 people who were left high and dry when Farepak collapsed in 2006 may look trivial in the greater scheme of things. But when one considers that among this group – disparaged by their bankers as Doris’ – are some of the least well-off in the country, who scraped and saved for a wonderful family Christmas, it is hard not to feel the most enormous sympathy. What is really disturbing about this sorry tale is the role played by Halifax Bank of Scotland (HBOS), the rotten bank that was saved from the knackers’ yard by Lloyds TSB and then th
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