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Found 4 results

  1. Bailiffs from 'Can't Pay We'll Take It Away' throw car park firm out of Huddersfield site for not paying its bills A national car park firm has been dramatically evicted from its Huddersfield site by bailiffs seen on television’s ‘Can’t Pay We’ll Take It Away’ show. Euro Car Parks was abruptly turfed out of its Lord Street site and the entrance chained over. It has now been claimed that the huge international firm, notorious for giving shoppers parking tickets, has itself failed to pay its bills. The Examiner understands it has not paid the past three months rent on the site, which was purchased by a private landlord recently for more than £700,000. The Examiner has asked Euro Car Parks for a comment but it has so far not responded. This morning a new firm, Simple Intelligent Parking, was busy installing its equipment and signs at the popular town centre car park. A spokesman said the landlord had become tired of waiting for payment and had recruited bailiffs from DCBL Ltd, who feature on the Channel 5 TV show, Can’t Pay We’ll Take It Away, to come and reclaim the site. He said he had assisted in dealing with the confused and upset employees of Euro Car Parks and customers, whose cars were locked in. And he revealed plans to improve the car park with a new surface and better markings were underway. Link
  2. A business standing in the way of Tottenham Hotspur's £400m stadium redevelopment has lost its High Court challenge against a compulsory purchase order being used to force it out. Archway Sheet Metal Works, in Paxton Road, Tottenham, north London, asked a judge to quash the order. The firm argued the order was "unlawful and invalid". But Mr Justice Dove ruled there was "no legal flaw" in the decision-making process. If Archway - the last objector to the purchase order - had won it could have thrown plans for the new 56,000 capacity stadium into disarray. Instead, unless there is a successful appeal against the ruling, it is believed the way is now clear for Tottenham Hotspur to go ahead and build a "world-class" football venue. Josif Josif, 46, who runs the family business producing metal items for the catering and hospitality industry, was in court with other family members to hear the judge's ruling. In November a mystery fire gutted the Archway premises, located yards from the White Hart Lane ground.
  3. Fifteen out of 50 payday lenders have thrown in the towel after being given a deadline by the trading watchdog to prove their business practices were up to scratch. The Office of Fair Trading (OFT) said that 14 of the lenders have told it that they are leaving the payday market and another firm which failed to meet the deadline has said it is no longer operating as a lender. The watchdog has been carrying out a probe into "deep-rooted" problems within the industry, such as lenders encouraging struggling borrowers to roll over loans they cannot afford so that the debt balloons. Last month it referred the sector for a full-blown investigation by the Competition Commission. A 12-week cut-off point set by the OFT for 50 lenders, which account for 90pc of the market, to show they are acting responsibly has now passed for all firms. The OFT said that of the 14 lenders who are leaving the payday industry, three have surrendered their licences completely. The other 11 continue to operate in other areas where they still need a consumer credit licence to trade, such as pawnbroking or debt collection, for example. The watchdog is going through reports provided by 46 firms in total, including the 11 firms who are pulling out of the payday market but still need to have a consumer credit licence. More: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/personalfinance/borrowing/10212065/Dodgy-payday-lenders-throw-in-the-towel.html
  4. Bosses preside over 'moral quagmire', says business secretary, as Barclays chief Bob Diamond is summoned to face MPs. Vince Cable has urged shareholders in UK banks to rise up and purge their companies of corrupt executives, who he says have allowed "systemic abuse" to take root in the banking system. The business secretary, writing in the Observer, says it is now clear that no one at Barclays Capital, the investment bank that triggered the market-rigging scandal, is prepared to take responsibility for endemic corruption, so the ultimate owners of banks must take matters into their own hands. Describing the problems in UK banking as "a moral quagmire of almost biblical proportions", Cable says the government is taking urgent action, including creating a clearer separation between "casino-style investment banking" and retail banking on the high street. Ministers will this week begin a review into the Libor system under which banks lend to each other and Cable hints that US-style criminal sanctions, such as the threat of prison terms, could be considered against those who abuse it. But he says shareholder power will be crucial. "Regulators are a backstop: they don't own banks," he writes. "The governance at the top of our leading banks has been shown to be lamentably weak. No one at the top of Barclays will take responsibility for systemic abuse. "Shareholders, the owners, have a major responsibility here. I am bringing in legislation to strengthen their control over pay and bonuses, through binding votes, but shareholders have to get a stronger grip on weak boards and out-of-control executives." Shareholders have already opposed the pay package of Sir Martin Sorrell, the head of advertising giant WPP, while Trinity Mirror boss Sly Bailey and Aviva's chief executive Andrew Moss quit following opposition from investors. Some shareholders were also unhappy with the remuneration package offered to Tesco's senior management in light of the supermarket's recent performance. Cable says he is determined to encourage "cultural change" throughout the system. He cites the takeover by the not-for-profit Co-operative Bank of a large chunk of the Lloyds bank network as a model for a future system. More: http://www.guardian.co.uk/business/2012/jun/30/vince-cable-shareholders-bank-cheats
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