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Found 4 results

  1. The internet activity of everyone in Britain will have to be stored for a year by service providers, under new surveillance law plans. Police and intelligence officers will be able to see the names of sites people have visited without a warrant, Home Secretary Theresa May said. But there would be new safeguards over MI5, MI6 and the police spying on the full content of people's web use. Mrs May told MPs the proposed powers were needed to fight crime and terror. Follow the latest developments on our live page The wide-ranging draft Investigatory Powers Bill also contains proposals covering how the state can hack devices and run operations to sweep up large amounts of data as it flows through the internet, enshrining in law the previously covert activities of GCHQ, as uncovered by whistleblower Edward Snowden. The draft bill's measures include: Giving a panel of judges the power to block spying operations authorised by the home secretary A new criminal offence of "knowingly or recklessly obtaining communications data from a telecommunications operator without lawful authority", carrying a prison sentence of up to two years Local councils to retain some investigatory powers, such as surveillance of benefit cheats, but they will not be able to access online data stored by internet firms The Wilson doctrine - preventing surveillance of Parliamentarians' communications - to be written into law Police will not be able to access journalistic sources without the authorisation of a judge A legal duty on British companies to help law enforcement agencies hack devices to acquire information if it is reasonably practical to do so Former Appeal Court judge Sir Stanley Burnton is appointed as the new interception of communications commissioner BBC
  2. taken from this link: https://www.gov.uk/government/news/surveillance-camera-code-of-conduct-comes-into-force New guidance in place over police and local authority use of CCTV and Automatic Number Plate Recognition. Public authority use of surveillance cameras will be subject to a new code of practice published by the Home Office today. The code will set out new guidelines for CCTV and Automatic Number Plate Recognition (ANPR), encourage transparency in their use and ensure public bodies such as local authorities and the police consider whether they are proportionate before erecting new cameras. It follows Andrew Rennison’s appointment as the first Surveillance Camera Commissioner last year. The commissioner’s role is to encourage all operators to comply with the code, review how the code is used in practice and provide advice and information about it. Surveillance by consent The principle of surveillance by consent is at the heart of the new legislation – meaning the public can be confident cameras are not there to spy on them but to protect them. Minister for Criminal Information Lord Taylor of Holbeach said: "CCTV and ANPR are crucial tools for cutting crime and protecting the public, but for too long we have seen these systems grow without proper oversight". "Through this code - and with an independent commissioner - there will be a framework in place for the first time that helps police and local authorities in the fight against crime and anti-social behaviour, while reassuring the public that cameras in public places are used proportionately and effectively". The surveillance camera code of practice, which has been laid before Parliament for approval, is part of the Protection of Freedoms Act 2012. Here is the New Surveillance Camera Code of Practice its in PDF:
  3. I don't know for sure if this is going to happen I just over heard a dept team leader mention while some one joked and asked why there is a 47" flatscreen tv in the office where we work. His answer is that it's going to be used to monitor workers. Again he could of been joking but what are my rightsaccording to this? I know cameras can be used to monitor people by the management(even the toilets) but surely granting access to this information to every one who walk pass the office to get the next bit of work or just going through? Anyone know if this is legal?
  4. I'm going through a tribunal at the moment for disability discrimination and harassment. I am off work due to various health problems. I have this morning found out that my employer's solicitor claims to have video evidence but has so far failed to disclose it. My solicitor has applied for a disclosure order. I know for a fact there is no video evidence from my workplace and in any case, if there was it would support my claim. I feel this evidence has to have been obtained covertly of me at home or shopping as these are the only places I go with the exception of the doctors and the hospital. I have struggled to find useful info about the law regarding employers doing this. Does anyone know about this or have any resources which may be useful?
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