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Found 17 results

  1. Simpler Internal Dispute Resolution Procedures for the AFPS READ MORE HERE: https://www.gov.uk/government/news/simpler-internal-dispute-resolution-procedures-for-the-afps
  2. Concerning the issue of whether we are a casual worker or a an employee there is many criteria to consider for example the time we work for the employer, our skills, whether he employs us only in case of shortage or during peak time or he uses us in the normal running of our business...etc. However I would like to know if the conclusive evidence is not when the P45 has been issued because if it has been issued one year after the start of employment this means that we are now an employee. It is up to the employer to decide if he need us anymore or nor and as a consequence if he send us our P45 or not. If the employer decides because it is not convenient for him not to issue a P45 at the end of each project we could be consider as an employee There is also the issue of HMRC and in order the employer not to pay tax maybe a worker has to work only for a small period of time and not come back for a long time There is also the issue of the difference between temporary employee and a casual worker
  3. My problem with NatWest started in October 2013. I saw I was overdrawn by £16K I only have an overdraft limit of £1,600. As it was a weekend I transferred money from my savings account and called them as soon as I could to find out what had gone wrong. The bank told me that my account had not been overdrawn and in fact had a healthy balance - I was confused? When I saw the statement for this time period I saw that for the first time ever in 30 years my statment transaction and processing dates were out of order and in some cases transactions had taken over 8 days to process! I also noticed that the £16K I had transferred from my savings account to my current account to cover the overdrawn balance had in fact been moved back and forth a few times (which I had not done). I knew something had happened but I just could not figure out what? I decided to put my statment transactions into date order and discovered that my account had gone -£16K at the time I had seen it on the screen. I started to complain again. Eventually I was given the following explanations. 1. The moving £16k was probably due to a bank ping back - normally caused by not having enough funds in your account to transfer in the first place. I checked this and at the time my savings account had £40k. But I was not able to continue to complain about this as the bank claimed that interbank account transfers could not be tampered with and that it was either a ping or I had done this. 2. The explanation given by the bank regarding the overdrawn amount I had seen, was that they had no record of my account being overdrawn during this month and my statment showed this. I told them the transaction dates were out of order and they told me that the transaction can only be processed when the merchant claims their money and they were not going to put them into date order. I explained that I had used my debit card to make these transactions and that I had seen the available balance lower by the amount at the same time of the transaction. It was around this time I had a very disturbing piece of information from NATWEST. When you use your debit card and authorise your payment the money leaves your available balance. The merchant then has 6 months to claim their money, HOWEVER, if they do not claim the money within 2 days the funds are returned to your available balance and can be respent. It is down to the customer to ensure they have funds to cover the transaction. I looked in the Terms and conditions and all sales literature I had from Natwest but there was nothing about this. I checked their on line Q & A but this was not explained there either. Natwest told me that it was not in their terms it was a banking process they follow. How can this be right? How can money you have already spent be returned to your available funds without your knowledge? How can you check your account without knowing this key information. I always thought that once you had made the transaction the money was gone. The only way to have the money returned would be if something had gone wrong and the transaction cancelled and/or a claim made to the bank! The Financial Ombudsman said that they had suggested that the bank should inform their customers about this process but could not enforce them to do so only the FCA could do that. They also said that the bank had followed their procedure correctly and there was no case to answer. I said I wanted to see which transactions had been returned and then processed so I could check myself. The FOS said that there is no record of this it is all done by an automated system. I asked how the FOS knew they had folllowed the procedure correctly and got no answer. The FCA told me that they do not take on individual cases. I have lost £16K through this but dont know how or if I can do anything about it! I would like to warn as people about this so people dont find themselves with unwelcome bank charges. I would welcome any advice or help anyone can offer.
  4. Yesterday morning I went to work without a care in the world. I was told by my manager then at 10am that an 'investigation' was being carried out as I had forgotten to lock a loaded vehicle overnight on Friday, thankfully it had been spotted and wasn't actually left unlocked. Then at 4:30 as I was leaving I was told that I had been dismissed and would be paid until the end of the week. I had no meetings (other than the initial 'we're investigating, did you do it chat), no chance to give my side across, and no letter or anything advising of my right to appeal. My manager had given me a sheet of paper to sign earlier in the day and said 'just sign it, it basically says you've been a numpty and you're sorry'. It basically said I admitted I had left the vehicle unlocked and I was sorry, as I had just had the investigation bombshell dropped on me I didn't question it I just signed it. Then at the end of the day again I was asked to sign a hand written paper and told it says I've told you you'll be paid until the end of the week and you're no longer employed by us. To be honest I was so shell shocked I just signed it without reading it. Some information: I have worked there for 6 months. I have a contract however disciplinary procedures are outlined in an employee handbook which I wasn't given and when I just went and asked for a copy I was told no. I know the same thing has happened by other staff members (and the mistake was not picked up until the next day when the vehicle had actually been left unlocked overnight) and they were basically told off, no formal disciplinary action was taken against them. When I got home last night I checked the jobcentre and found my job already advertised. I have written a letter of appeal and spoke to the HR person who apologised that I was told in the warehouse around other staff members that I had been dismissed and asked me to go back tonight for a meeting with her and the 2 top bosses. I don't want to take them to court I just want my job back. I made a genuine mistake which I held my hands up for immediately however my punishment is much harsher than anyone else has received. Is there anything I can do or say to encourage them to change their minds and overrule the decision? Have they followed procedures correctly? Thanks in advance for any advise.
  5. Hi all....theres lots to this but I work for a company that within just over 15 months has grown from approx 8 personnel including the MD to now over 180 with three directors in functional positions. We have...ABSOLUTELY. no policies or procdeures for anything....and I really do mean nothing at all. recently they have tried to discipline 2 people...they had Union reps with them and the procedures had to be stopped. We have no..first aid kits, no first aiders, no fire wardens, no evacuation procedure, No Equality and diversity policy, no staff handbooks etc the list goes on and on. our fire alarms are never checked and there are no evacuation practices. I am about to become the focus of a complaint and plan to use the opportunity to hopefully...wake them up to a few things. Our HR and legal department are a young girl who has a bout as much experience and indeed the qualifications of a lollipop stick. Please help.
  6. Hi, Just a quick question regarding following works procedures. If you do your job and the company accept the way you (and others) have carried out your duties over a long period of time, can they all of a sudden say you have not followed the procedures laid out and dismiss you for gross misconduct ? Having never been told/warned or had any discipline about it previously. Or is it a case of tough luck. Thanks
  7. Hello. I have come to this forum as a result of already having gleaned a lot of useful information from other posts on this website. I am seeking advice from anyone who is or has had trouble with Sherrif Officers due to unpaid parking fines. Before I ask for specific adice though, I will provide a background to the situation. My girlfriend (Sue), or rather her address, is getting targetted by Sherrif's Officers working under the jurisdiction of Perth Sherrif court (Scots Law). They are chasing after her ex-boyfriend (Tom) for an unpaid parking ticket and have served an 'Attachment Schedule', threatening to uplift a vehicle, which is now owned and mainly driven by Sue. Although Tom still has contact with my gf, he is obvioulsy no longer with her and the car in which he incurred the parking ticket, was passed onto Sue quite some time ago. The story behind who the registered keeper is, who the owner is, and who insures the car, is convoluted, but: Tom was the owner, and the driver of vehicle when ticket was issued. Sue has been the owner of the vehicle for some 8-9 months. Tom is still the main insurer of the vehicle, with Sue as named driver (for Sue to insure herself it would cost twice as much). The vehicle was registered in Tom's name until (surprise/surprise, oh what a coincidence) just a few days before the 'Attachment Schedule' when his mother became the registered keeper of the car. Tom has never permanently lived at Sue's address, but somehow these (Edit) have tracked the car down to her home. The first visit of the Sherrif officers, was dealt with by Sue. They issued her with the 'Attachment Schedule' addressed to Tom, threatening to uplift the car if the fines + add-on expense are not paid. She relies on the car for everything (lives in the countryside) and in typical female fashion, feels so intimidated by the Sherrif officer's authority, that she is wanting to pay the fine plus all additional costs, some 350 GBP by now! I am of course absolutely shocked and disgusted by this prospect and know for a fact that since the vehicle does not belong to Tom, there is no way that the Sherrif's men have the right to do this. Tom was contacted, and he duly got his mother to write a letter, countersigned by him, stating that the vehicle (very recently registered in her name even though she dont even drive), is her property and that any attempt to uplift the vehicle would be unlawful....property, 9/10ths of the law n all that. Yesterday however, i answered Sue's front door to greet a couple of the Sherrif's men. My personal policy when dealing with these people is to give them absolutley no information whatsoever. This is what I done yesterday in addition to being pretty rude towards them (the least I could do). They clearly believed that I was Tom, and served me with another brown envelope with 'Tom' written on the front of it. I refused the envelope and threw it back in thier faces. I found it this morning laying sodden wet next to Sue's front door. I am therefore wondering if anyone could fill me in on what the correct moves to make here would be. My instinct tells me not to open the envelope to find out what the Sherrif Officers next move is. So could anyone tell me what this would likely be? If my girlfriend has already told the Sherrif's officers that Tom does not live with her, and Tom's mother has sent them a letter stating that she owns the vehicle, could the Sherrif's mens persistence in visiting Sue's address and issuing bits of paper to people who do notlive there, not be construed as 'Harassment'? I know that according to the written letter of the law, that the Sherrif's men have no right to uplift Sue's car. But I also have zero faith in Scottish justice and suspect that they may well go ahead and do this. Could anyone suggest any measures, which in the event that the Sherrif's men did unlawfully execute the Attachment Schedule, would provide a very strong case for the owner and the registered keeper of the car in the subsequent civil court case? THX.
  8. Hello all I have a lot of practical experience of the Charging Order process from the creditor's perspective, and I'd be more than happy to provide advice and guidance to anyone who is faced with the prospect of having an application issued against their property. If you need any info on the process itself, the documentation, Court hearings etc. then please ask away and I'll do my best to help
  9. New rules about appeal rights and making appeals against benefit decisions are due for widespread implementation from 28 October. Overview From 28 October 2013, new appeal rules and procedures that already apply to universal credit (UC) and personal independence payment (PIP) are due to be extended to benefits administered by the DWP. Housing benefit is not included – the appeal arrangements for that benefit will remain the same. It is understood that for benefits (child benefit and guardian’s allowance) and tax credits administered by HMRC, the new rules and procedures will be introduced from April 2014, although this is not yet confirmed. The changes are: a requirement to have had, on request, a revision of the benefit decision before the right of appeal arises: so-called ‘mandatory reconsideration’; where mandatory reconsideration applies, the appeal is to be made directly to HM Courts and Tribunals Service, and not to the decision maker: so-called ‘direct lodgement’; time limits for DWP responses to appeals sent to HM Courts and Tribunals Service – but not until October 2014. What is mandatory reconsideration? This clumsy term is the official name given to the requirement that before appeal rights arise a request for the decision to be revised must be made, and that the decision maker then accepts that request so as to consider a revision. If the revision is considered, the claimant is sent a decision on the result of that in a ‘mandatory reconsideration notice’. If the claimant is still unhappy, s/he may then appeal. For example, the revision decision may refuse to change the original decision, in which case the claimant may remain unhappy and so wish to appeal. The usual time limit for appeal applies, from the date the decision in the mandatory reconsideration notice was sent. Note that a revision is required: a supersession will not do. The overall effect is to end the right of direct appeal against an initial benefit decision. The DWP is clear that if the request for revision is late and is not accepted by the decision maker, there is no revision, and there will be no right of appeal. In effect, therefore, the mandatory reconsideration notice is the official recognition of a right of appeal. 1The actual rules that apply to UC and PIP do not read quite as clearly as that. They say that under mandatory reconsideration a claimant has the right of appeal ‘only if the Secretary of State has considered on an application whether to revise the decision...’ (emphasis added).2 The official line is that if there has been a request for a revision, but it is late and the request is not then accepted for consideration, then the decision maker will not have gone on to ‘consider whether to revise’ the decision. Consequently, there is no revision, no mandatory reconsideration notice and no right of appeal. The government has pointed out that it has eased the late revision rules by removing the requirement that the application has ‘merit’ and removing the provision that the fact that the claimant was ignorant of, or misunderstood, the law cannot be taken into account.3 Disputes about whether there has been a mandatory reconsideration will be decided by HM Courts and Tribunals Service, but in practice it will normally look for a mandatory reconsideration notice – ie, a revision decision. The requirement to have a revision (even if that does not actually change the original decision) means that revision grounds and time limits will become especially important in retaining appeal rights. Standard advice is to request a revision within one month of the sending of the decision wherever possible, to ensure a revision on ‘any grounds’ and guaranteeing that there will be a mandatory reconsideration. Otherwise, a request for a statement of reasons for the decision can slightly extend the time allowed for revision (if the DWP accepts that reasons were not already included in the decision, which is rare), a late request for an any grounds revision can be made, or a revision can be carried out ‘at any time’ on limited grounds (usually restricted to cases of official error). But all of those depend on the DWP accepting the request and going on to consider a revision – if not, then there is no right of appeal. Late requests for any time revisions are likely to be the most important route here. Rules currently differ slightly for UC and PIP (and contribution-based jobseeker’s allowance (JSA) and contributory employment and support allowance (ESA) under the UC system) and other benefits, but in essence involve a 13-month time limit, a requirement to show why late revision is sought, why it is ‘reasonable’ to grant it and how ‘special circumstances’ meant it was not practicable to meet the one-month time limit.4 Official guidance says that this should be applied broadly, and the claimant should not be required to show ‘unexpected’ or ‘exceptional’ circumstances.5 When does mandatory reconsideration apply? Mandatory reconsideration has applied to UC and PIP since April. It is expected that mandatory reconsideration will apply to other DWP benefit decisions dated on or after 28 October 2013. That includes decisions about JSA and ESA. The original benefit decision should include a statement to the effect that there is a right of appeal only where the decision maker has considered on an application whether to revise the decision. (If there is no such statement, then mandatory reconsideration does not apply.) Also, the decision should include the one-month time limit for an ‘any grounds’ revision and of the possibility for requesting a statement of reasons where that is not already included. If mandatory revision applies but the claimant attempts to appeal straight away, that may be treated as a request for a revision.6 How is a mandatory reconsideration requested? There are no new arrangements for requesting a revision. It is simply a matter of requesting a revision (or at least asking that the decision is looked at again or be reconsidered) in the normal way, within the standard one-month time limit wherever possible. There is no official form. The request does not have to be in writing but it is better that it is, especially if the standard one-month time limit has not been complied with. The mandatory reconsideration process will involve a decision maker contacting the claimant by telephone before the revision is made, to ‘talk through’ the disputed decision and invite her/him to submit any additional evidence.7 Making an appeal Following the mandatory reconsideration, the appeal must be lodged directly with HM Courts and Tribunals Service and not, as before, with the decision maker.8 This is called ‘direct lodgement’. HM Courts Service has produced a new appeal form (Form SSCS1 – How to appeal against a decision made by the Department from Work and Pensions) and guidance about the process. Its use is not mandatory but is recommended (in any case certain basic requirements including reasons for the appeal remain mandatory). It is understood that if the current appeal form (GL24) is inadvertently used where mandatory reconsideration applies, that will not in itself invalidate the appeal. In England and Wales, ‘direct lodgement’ appeals should be sent to HMCTS SSCS Appeals Centre, PO Box 1203, BRADFORD BD1 9WP. In Scotland, they should be sent to HMCTS SSCS Appeals Centre, PO Box 27080, GLASGOW G2 9HQ. The standard time limit for the appeal is that it must be received at HM Courts and Tribunals Service within one month after the date on which the claimant was sent the result of the mandatory reconsideration – ie, the revision decision in the mandatory reconsideration notice.9 Late appeals remain possible – ie, the tribunal can waive the one-month rule. The tribunal rules require that a copy of the mandatory reconsideration notice is included with the claimant’s notice of appeal.10 It is understood that to facilitate that, claimants will be sent two copies of the mandatory reconsideration notice. However, it should also be noted that the tribunal has the power to waive the requirement to include a copy (as with any other requirement under the tribunal rules)11 – so that a claimant who identifies her/his revision decision well enough might have her/his appeal accepted even without a copy of the mandatory reconsideration notice. If a claimant attempts to lodge an appeal with HM Courts and Tribunals Service without having had a mandatory reconsideration, the appeal will be returned with advice that it is not valid and that a mandatory reconsideration from the DWP should be sought.12 Time limits The DWP has undertaken ‘to introduce time limits to stipulate how long [it] has to respond to an individual appeal’ from October 2014.13 It says that will mean that the DWP will have 28 days to provide an appeal ‘response’ (ie, a set of appeal papers) to be sent to HM Courts and Tribunals Service. Note that there is no intention to introduce any time limit for carrying out a mandatory reconsideration. Note also that at time of writing the relevant rule is unamended (including for UC and PIP), and merely requires the decision maker to provide a response ‘as soon as reasonably practicable’.14 Personal Remarks The DWP denies that mandatory reconsideration involves an extra step in the appeals process or that it constitutes an important change in appeal rights.15 Very arguably, it is both. If revisions are (as the DWP says) carried out anyway it is difficult to see what extra value in terms of dispute resolution there is in requiring one. Someone who wishes to dispute a decision more than a month after the original decision is currently (apart from in UC and PIP cases) able to request a late appeal, even if a late revision is refused. Under mandatory reconsideration s/he cannot. If her/his request for a late or an ‘any time’ revision is refused, then (on the official approach) s/he will not have the right of appeal at all. Judicial review is the only legal redress. Furthermore, claimants will be without the benefit claimed pending the outcome of their request for a mandatory reconsideration. In ESA cases (currently the majority of appeals), it remains that ESA pending appeal is only payable when an appeal has been made – ie, not while a mandatory reconsideration is pending. The very real concern is that many claimants will abandon their dispute because of the simple need to sustain themselves and their families. 1. See, for example, ‘Detailed Lines to Take for Customer Representative Groups’, and Advice for Decision Makers, A3015 and A5043, 2. Reg 7(2) The Universal Credit, Personal Independence Payment, Jobseeker’s Allowance and Employment and Support Allowance (Decisions and Appeals) Regulations 2013 No.381 (the ‘UC, PIP etc D&A Regs’) 3. DWP, Mandatory consideration of revision before appeal, Government response to public consultation, September 2012 (DWP), p16. At time of writing, only the UC, PIP etc DA Regs late revision rule was in this form. 4. Reg 6 UC, PIP etc (D&A) Regs; reg 3 Social Security and Child Support (Decisions and Appeals) Regulations 1999 No.991. It is assumed that reg 3 of the latter regulations will be aligned with regulation 6 of the UC, PIP etc (D&A) Regs, in particular to remove the requirement that the late application has ‘merit’ and that the claimant’s ignorance of or misunderstanding of the law cannot be taken into account. 5. Advice for Decision Makers, A3016 6. Reg 7 UC, PIP etc D&A Regs 7. DWP, Appeals Reform: an introduction, April 2013, 8. Rule 22 The Tribunal Procedure (First-tier Tribunal) (Social Entitlement Chamber) Rules 2008 No.2685 (the ‘Tribunal Rules’) 9. Rule 22(2)(d)(i) Tribunal Rules 10. Rule 22(4)(a)(i) Tribunal Rules 11. Rule 7 Tribunal Rules 12. ‘Detailed Lines to Take for Customer Representative Groups’ at 13. DWP, Appeals Reform: an introduction, April 2013, 14. Rule 24(1)(b) Tribunal Rules 15. ‘Appeals Process Changes – Customer Representative Group Questions and Answers’ , V1.0a, DWP, December 2012,
  10. HI, What happens if a tenant doesn't submit a Defence and Counterclaim by the due date the courts have set out
  11. Hi, praticaly all correspondence I receive from my respondent's solicitors is liberally peppered with quoted sections from various procedures and legislation. So much so it does induce a certain amount of word-blindness and unease (which I think is part of the reason it is included!). Are there a few basic pieces of legislation and/or guidance notes that I should be looking at in order to appreciate the overall business of the Tribunal and the responsibilities of both the claimant and the respondent. The tribunal service sent me a few very basic booklets - but nothing that covers the procedural tomfoolery of my respondent's solicitors. Any pointers would be most useful.
  12. Hiya All I have a very Basic Question concerning Policies/Procedures. If a Employer has acted under various policies and procedures [in a way that targetted/excluded individuals/groups] which turn out not to exist - how would that affect a potential employment tribunal case? How would you explain the non-existance to a Judge? I am sure there will be some in interesting replies so fire away people. Cheers
  13. Thanks for taking the time to read my thread, much appreciated. I am currently researching disciplinary procedures over the internet because I have been suspended over gross misconduct (theft) and I wanted some advice. I know what I have done is wrong, but I have looked on the ACAS website and called helplines and they are telling me that the company has not followed the procedure properly. I was called into a room for questioning, without a witness and without a recording taking place. The interviewer concluded that disciplinary action has to be taken forward. However the people I have contacted have told me that I should have had someone with me in the room at the time. But according to my own companies policies, that stage was considered "informal" but in the eyes of those who I spoke to said that it is formal because they are making a complaint against me. I also have filed a grievence to the company prior to this and have been told that the company must resolve this before disciplinary. My friend said that legally, they has to veto this problem because they havent followed the law. Also I paid back the money, before the outcome has be determined and my friend said that should not have happened. I know its a lot but I really need help. I really want to keep my job and I have shown remorse to my employer but they are still adament. I work in retail. Thank you.
  14. Posting this with thanks to madpriest I don't know whether anyone else has posted this - I couldn't see it - This information supercedes all information regarding county court Actions etc. (1) You can no longer take your completed N1 to the local county court. You either have to do it online as MCOL or you have to send your N1 in to a central processing office. Note well that MCOL only allows around 1500 characters so if you have a long Particulars of Claim (POC) then you will need to send it in. (I personally think this is a better idea as a completed blue N1 naming the bank as a 'defendent; is a thing of great beauty !!) (2) Your N1 should not state a county court in the top right hand corner but it should contain "CC MCC NORTHAMPTON". All Money claims are now nominally issues from Northampton (3) On the new N1 there are the words "You must indicate preferred court for hearings here" ---- At this point insert the name of your local county court. What happens is that the case gets formally 'transferred' from Northampton to your local county court. (4) You can get the most up to date N1 here http://hmctsformfinder.justice.gov.u...s/n001-eng.pdf (6) Payment - You either have to send a cheque for the fees, or a postal order. If you want to pay by card, you need to send a covering letter, in LARGE TYPE, asking them to contact you and give them a phone number. (This if course is the governments very well thought out plan !) (7) Allocation. I haven't got here yet. My understanding is that you get a communication from the County Court Money Claims Centre telling you about allocation and where you can get the form. They no longer send the allocation questionnaire to you. (8) Addresses as follows: (8.1) ENGLAND County Court Money Claims Centre POBOX 527 Salford M5 0BY (8.2) WALES POBox 552 SALFORD M5 0EG (8.3) SCOTLAND (Totally foreign country - I have no idea) PHONE for both 0300 123 1372 (9) Now there is an e-filing email ccmcce-filing@hmcts.gsi.gov.uk but this is not to be used for filing money claims. I've got no idea what its for but it could be for filing your allocation questionnaires. (10) Upon allocation, the case is then 'transferred' to your local court. Good Luck everybody - I hope this has been helpful Madpriest
  15. I don't know whether anyone else has posted this - I couldn't see it - This information supercedes all information regarding County Court Actions etc. (1) You can no longer take your completed N1 to the local county court. You either have to do it online as MCOL or you have to send your N1 in to a central processing office. Note well that MCOL only allows around 1500 characters so if you have a long Particulars of Claim (POC) then you will need to send it in. (I personally think this is a better idea as a completed blue N1 naming the bank as a 'defendent; is a thing of great beauty !!) (2) Your N1 should not state a county court in the top right hand corner but it should contain "CC MCC NORTHAMPTON". All Money claims are now nominally issues from Northampton (3) On the new N1 there are the words "You must indicate preferred court for hearings here" ---- At this point insert the name of your local county court. What happens is that the case gets formally 'transferred' from Northampton to your local county court. (4) You can get the most up to date N1 here http://hmctsformfinder.justice.gov.uk/courtfinder/forms/n001-eng.pdf (6) Payment - You either have to send a cheque for the fees, or a postal order. If you want to pay by card, you need to send a covering letter, in LARGE TYPE, asking them to contact you and give them a phone number. (This if course is the governments very well thought out plan !) (7) Allocation. I haven't got here yet. My understanding is that you get a communication from the County Court Money Claims Centre telling you about allocation and where you can get the form. They no longer send the allocation questionnaire to you. (8) Addresses as follows: (8.1) ENGLAND County Court Money Claims Centre POBOX 527 Salford M5 0BY (8.2) WALES POBox 552 SALFORD M5 0EG (8.3) SCOTLAND (Totally foreign country - I have no idea) PHONE for both 0300 123 1372 (9) Now there is an e-filing email ccmcce-filing@hmcts.gsi.gov.uk but this is not to be used for filing money claims. I've got no idea what its for but it could be for filing your allocation questionnaires. (10) Upon allocation, the case is then 'transferred' to your local court. Good Luck everybody - I hope this has been helpful Madpriest
  16. http://www.independent.co.uk/money/loans-credit/victory-for-campaigners-as-ripoff-lenders-face-instant-closure-8223242.html One hope that the Office of Fair Trading will show a robust approach to the illegal business practices shown by certain payday lenders. I am sure that many CAGgers will have a great deal of information to send to the OFT in Spring.
  17. My partner's employer has started disciplinary action against him for alleged gross misconduct (which he did not do). He is faced with an informal fact-finding meeting next week and the person who will be conducting the meeting is the accuser as well as an alleged witness to the situation. Does anybody have any idea about whether this is acceptable or not as it would seem that having an involved party conduct the investigation means that it won't be heard fairly.
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