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Found 11 results

  1. I guess there is always the telephone book? I have Yellow Pages and a local directory delivered every year. For the full story :- http://www.mirror.co.uk/money/great-118-rip-could-end-10410058
  2. Woah!!! Wonga will not face a criminal investigation after sending out fake legal letters to pressure customers into paying back their debts. City of London Police said that, after a ‘thorough review’ it has concluded ‘there is not sufficient evidence to progress a criminal investigation’.
  3. The Royal Bank of Scotland has agreed to pay $100m (£61m) after US investigations into illegal transactions with Iran, Sudan, Burma and Cuba. The bank has entered into agreements with the US Federal Reserve, the US Treasury Department and the New York State Department of Financial Services. In a statement, the bank said it "acknowledges and deeply regrets these failings". The bank also said it has committed almost $490m (£300m) since 2010 to improve its sanctions controls. Criminal authorities at the US Justice Department and the District Attorney of New York have closed their relate
  4. The Serious Fraud Office is considering criminal allegations that Royal Bank of Scotland defrauded companies by forcing them into default so it could make a profit. The Financial Times reports the SFO has interviewed former executives of UK businesses affected by RBS’ Restructuring Group, which is responsible for the bank’s riskier loans. The SFO is looking to find out whether RBS behaved within the law and whether it was guilty of bad business practice. This week RBS appointed law firm Clifford Chance to carry out an inquiry into allegations it systematically defrauded companies. Th
  5. Scottish Power is to pay customers £8.5m after an investigation by industry regulator Ofgem into its doorstep and telephone selling. Ofgem said customers were misled during sales approaches due to Scottish Power's failure to "adequately train and monitor" staff. Consumers on the "warm home discount" will receive about £50 each. Money will also go to those who were misled. The company has apologised for the errors between 2009 and 2012. "Today's announcement is a clear signal to energy suppliers of the consequences of breaching licence obligations," said Ofgem's senior partn
  6. City regulator to investigate whether insurers 'drag heels' when it comes to paying claims. The new City regulator will investigate whether insurers are "dragging their heels" when it comes to settling valid claims, and relying on the small print of policies to avoid paying customers. Martin Wheatley, the chief executive of the Financial Conduct Authority said this investigation would form part of a wider "thematic" review into the insurance industry. Announcing this investigation he said that the number of complaints against insurance companies was rising "and more [of these complaints
  7. Hong Kong is to investigate possible Libor rigging by UBS, a day after the Swiss bank agreed to pay £940m to regulators for trying to manipulate the key rate on an "epic scale" and two former traders at the bank were charged with conspiracy. The Hong Kong Monetary Authority, the city's de facto central bank, said it has received information from overseas regulators about "possible misconduct" by UBS involving submissions for the city's interbank rate, known as Hibor, and other reference rates in Asia. UBS was fined by Swiss, British and US regulators on Wednesday after an investigation r
  8. HSBC is expected to pay more than $1.5bn (£933m) in fines to US authorities within weeks to settle money-laundering investigations into its business. HSBC is expected to pay more than $1.5bn (£933m) in fines to US authorities within weeks to settle money-laundering investigations into its business. The bank could be fined the sum as early as next week as part of a settlement with federal prosecutors, according to reports yesterday. HSBC has put aside $1.5bn to meet the cost of the fines, but admitted at its latest results presentation that the eventual penalty could be “significantly high
  9. Royal Bank of Scotland could be fined up to £300m later this year to settle allegations traders sought to manipulate the libor interest rate, according to reports. The British bank is said to be in talks with the Financial Services Authority in the UK and the Department of Justice and the Commodity Futures Trading Commission in the US, The Financial Times reported. Stephen Hester, the chief executive of RBS, warned in the summer that the state-owned bank was one of several global lenders being investigated over the alleged manipulation of an interest rate used as the benchmark for billio
  10. Standard Chartered has said it is not involved in the Libor-rigging investigations. Standard Chartered has disclosed that it is not being investigated over the Libor-rigging scandal that has hit the banking industry as it reported its 10th consecutive record set of financial results. Peter Sands, its chief executive, said the bank was not in the frame over rigging of either Libor or Euribor, unlike several other British banks, and that no staff had been suspended. The lender, which focuses on emerging markets, reported a 9pc rise in pre-tax profits for the first six months of the year to
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