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Found 6 results

  1. Post-Monarch review finds too many passengers flying unprotected READ MORE HERE: https://www.gov.uk/government/news/post-monarch-review-finds-too-many-passengers-flying-unprotected
  2. Got a Drone / Unmanned Aircraft and thinking of flying it in the UK or Abroad? Here we will explain to you the UK Law on using Drones / Unmanned Aircraft and the Drones Code for safe flying that you need to follow. Drones / Unmanned Aircraft have now become so popular in the UK and the laws relating to the flying of unmanned aircraft have evolved and there is now a UK Drone Code by the Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) which anyone flying a drone must adhere to. CAA Flying Drones: https://www.caa.co.uk/Consumers/Model-aircraft-and-drones/Flying-drones/ Drone Code: http://dronesafe.uk/drone-code/ Drone Code - 400ft (120m) SAFETY AWARENESS OF YOUR DRONE Always keep your Drone in line of sight Always stay below 400ft (120m) to comply with the drone code AWARE OF YOUR DRONE AT ALL TIMES Every time you fly your Drone you must follow the Manufacturers Instructions You must keep the right distance from People and Property --People & Properties - 150ft (50m) --Crowds & Built up areas - 500ft (150m) don’t overfly LEGAL Legal responsibility every time you fly a Drone lies with YOU and failure to fly responsibly could result in a Criminal Prosecution Stay well away from Aircraft, Airports & Airfields, if your Drone endangers the safety of an Aircraft it is a Criminal Offence REMEMBER Don’t fly near Airports or Airfield Remember to stay below 400ft (120m) Observe your drone at all times - stay 150ft (50m) away from People and Property Never fly near Aircraft Enjoy responsibly Sources of Interest for other Countries Australia Australian Government Civil Aviation Authority - Flying Drones Link: https://www.casa.gov.au/aircraft/landing-page/flying-drones-australia Austria https://www.austrocontrol.at/en/aviation_agency/licenses__permissions/flight_permissions/rpas Belgium http://mobilit.belgium.be/nl/luchtvaart Canada https://www.tc.gc.ca/eng/civilaviation/drone-safety.html Cyprus http://www.mcw.gov.cy/mcw/dca/dca.nsf/All/BBFF6A8BE57D3C07C2257F45002657CC?OpenDocument&highlight=drones Czech Republic http://www.caa.cz/letadla-bez-pilota-na-palube/prehled-zakladnich-pozadavku-na-bezpilotni-systemy Finland http://www.trafi.fi/en/aviation/unmanned_aviation France http://www.developpement-durable.gouv.fr/Drones-civils-loisir-activite.html Ireland https://www.iaa.ie/general-aviation/drones Italy http://www.enac.gov.it/servizio/info_in_english/courtesy_translations/info-1220929004.html Luxembourg https://dac.public.lu/actualites/2014/2/General-conditions-for-unmanned-aircraft-system-_UAS_-operations-within-the-Luxembourg-airspace/index.html Netherlands https://www.ilent.nl/onderwerpen/transport/luchtvaart/dronevliegers/index.aspx New Zealand https://www.caa.govt.nz/rpas/index-2/#CAR Norway http://www.luftfartstilsynet.no/selvbetjening/allmennfly/Droner/Use_of_RPASDrones_in_Norway Romania http://www.caa.ro/stiri/guidelines-for-the-remotely-piloted-aircraft-systems-rpas-operation-within-the-romanian-airspace Slovakia http://letectvo.nsat.sk/letova-prevadzka/lietadla-sposobile-lietat-bez-pilota/ South Africa http://www.caa.co.za/Pages/RPAS/Remotely%20Piloted%20Aircraft%20Systems.aspx Sweden http://www.transportstyrelsen.se/en/Aviation/Aircraft/UAS/ United States of America https://www.faa.gov/uas/ Drones - Unmanned Aircraft Guidance.pdf
  3. Lord Mayor of Copenhagen accuses Ryanair of 'social dumping' and bans staff from flying with company on official business In a plot twist worthy of a Nordic Noir serial, the Lord Mayor of Copenhagen has dented Ryanair’s plans to make a killing with its new base in the Danish capital. Frank Jensen, a Social Democrat who has been the city’s Lord Mayor for five years, has banned staff from flying with Ryanair while on official business - even if it means paying much more on the Scandinavian airline SAS. Copenhagen has 45,000 municipal workers. Mr Jensen told the Berlinske newspaper: “We require all of those who deliver services to the municipality, including those who would sell us plane tickets, to offer their employees proper salaries and working conditions.” On his Facebook page, he described Ryanair’s practices as “social dumping.” Ryanair responded by tweeting a picture of Mr Jensen’s face superimposed on Marie-Antoinette’s body, with the slogan: “Let them eat cake!” and “Let them pay high fares!” The Dublin-based airline has a long history of striving to avoid what it sees as onerous labour laws by employing crew on contracts written under Irish law. The Danish trade-union movement is seeking to have this practice overturned, with a case set for next month. Ryanair, which is the biggest budget carrier in Europe, set up a base in Copenhagen this year. It had previously offered flights to the city, though rather than landing in the Danish capital they actually touched down at Malmo in Sweden - on the other side of the bridge between the two nations. Copenhagen is already experiencing strong low-cost competition, with Norwegian and easyJet taking on SAS. Ryanair’s schedule from the capital serves a dozen cities, including London Luton, Madrid and Milan Bergamo.
  4. BT has installed flying cables outside my hotel, whereby the sea views have been severely obstructed. I have exhausted all the higher complaint levels within BT and written to both the private secretary and CEO twice via recorded delivery. They fail to reply. I need now to pursue a legal course of action. I believe BT has breach the Telecommunications Act 1984, whereby there is a clause which prohibits BT flying cables which interferes with the carrying on of any business. Our whole business hinges on our views which are now obstructed and guests are complaining. I could issue a writ for say £9k under the £10k limit, whereby I would not be pursued for legal cost should I fail to win such case. On the other hand, I might lose, simply because I may find it hard to justify such financial losses. I understand how to issue a writ for the claim of monies, but how do I go about getting a District Judge to rule that BT has acted unlawfully? What Court process options can I adopt? Thank you
  5. A major study by consumer group Which? found that Tuesdays are the cheapest day of the week to fly out of Britain, and travelling midweek can save people a significant sum of money. For outbound flights Tuesday was, on average, the cheapest day to fly with the three biggest airlines in the UK. Flights with EasyJet from London Gatwick to Alicante on a Friday were, on average, 35 per cent or £28 more expensive than a Tuesday. Which? found flying on a Sunday was, on average, the most expensive day to return home. Return flights with EasyJet from London Gatwick to Alicante on Sundays were, on average, 45 per cent or £56 more expensive than Thursdays. The study also revealed that as well as cheaper days, there were cheaper times of the day to fly, though this varied across different airlines. BA's cheapest outbound flights were before 7.30am in the morning. However, outbound flights with EasyJet between 5.45am and 11am in the mornings were their most expensive. http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/aviation/9501573/Flying-Its-cheapest-to-catch-a-plane-on-a-Tuesday.html#
  6. That really is sad, one of my favourite groups of all time: R.I.P. Big boy - you brought a lot of pleasure to a lot of people and will be sadly missed not least by me.
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