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  1. Bank (HSBC) apparently can only dispute it after the transaction was done. Website where the ticket was bought: Trainline.fr - the homepage looks nice and is Web Accessible to a good standard, but once you go through the booking things change, even I can see that. Surely switching the departure station and destination station around is not a big fix for a ticket seller. The journey remains effectively the same.
  2. Hi, My relative attempted to book a train ticket from destination A to destination B in the EU. Instead she bought it in reverse from destination B to A, the prices are the same either way. Immediately after purchase she contacted the website to adjust the error. She was told she made a mistake and that the tickets are non-refundable entirely blaming her for the error. However, I am not sure the error on the ticket was entirely her fault. 1) She has a disability and found the website was confusing and difficult to use. There were web accessibility problems. Web accessibility problems will have a disadvantage to people with certain disabilities and it will cost them money in a situation like this one. 2) She had to keep on moving back or refreshing pages as they kept timing out. The error made in the purchase might have been the result of the poor website performance, or because she had to go back on the pages. 3) The information provided on the site was not clear enough, or was not delivered in a way that was clear enough, further increasing the possibility of the error being overlooked during the check out. 4) Despite reaching out to the seller immediately after making the purchase for a ticket for a journey that is to take place only in July, the seller refused to reverse the charge or fix the error on the ticket. 5) The seller blamed my relative for the error, when the fault could lie with the website itself. This would actually means that a seller can design a website that would deliberately lead some customers to make errors, thus making people buy two tickets instead of one, and in that way sell more tickets. It’s concerning. Do we have any rights in these situations? Or do the ticket selling sites do what they want more or less? Any views would be great. Thank you.
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