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George563

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About George563

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  1. The death penalty will not bring the victim back to life, under the assumption that the victim of the crime had died as a result of being murdered or had indirectly died as a result of the suspect's actions. I have always said that you can't put a fire out with a flammable liquid, and so therefore you can't bring the victim back by killing the perpetrator. The way I look at is that only living people can serve life sentences - when they die, it is the equivalent of that person being released from that sentence, and so justice cannot be done in that respect. If suffering is part of a person's punishment than it's better that a person is alive as part of that punishment - dead people don't suffer. What if there are future charges coming to light and the person responsible has already been executed? It means that the person has got away with it, ironically enough. The old "Wanted Dead or Alive" concept - better alive than dead. Justice can be done better if the suspect is alive. Regarding serial killers - after sentencing, the probability is that they may have killed dozens more, so perhaps it might be easier for the police and the courts to have the suspect kept alive so that they can be tried for any future charges that could possibly come to light? Dead people don't go to court and dead people are not found guilty - only living people are.
  2. Well, when I send my Christmas cards in the post at the start of December I often choose a charity at random and send a cheque for £5 to that charity inside a Christmas card. In recent years, my Christmas donations has been to Stonewall, Parkinson's UK, and Caring at Christmas. Last year's donation was to the Great Ormond Street Children's Hospital, and this year, I have decided to make my donation to the ManKind Initiative - they seem to be an organisation that would benefit me more personally than the others that I have donated to so far. I am very impartial when it comes to donating - I believe that one donation each to six different charities helps more people than six donations to just one charity. Merry Christmas.
  3. I have always thought that the names of storms seem slightly daft. I know that I believe its an American thing, probably because they have them a lot more often than in Britain - I mean, the 1987 storm didn't even have a name, did it? I don't remember one being used, although I would have named it Michael after Michael Fish. The names always seem to be dated names such as Gladys or Doris, probably due to the fact that the tradition of giving storms and hurricanes names go back to when those names were fashionable.
  4. Very strange that we have storms on 16th October on the 30th anniversary of the hurricane we had in 1987. We don't even have these coincidences regarding the probability of snow on 25th December. I remember Michael Fish misleading the nation about it, and I also remember going to school on the Friday morning, and I felt as if I was being lifted off the pavement as I walked to school, and despite most of the kids living more local to school then I did, very few of them turned up that morning. I suppose that we felt the very mild side of it as I was in the East Midlands, although I know that in the South East, where it was all happening and all hell had broke loose there. It's not to be confused with the very little remembered storm from January 1990, in which Allo Allo's Gorden Kaye, (who we lost in January this year), nearly lost his life exactly 27 years before when a plank from an advertising board had smashed against his windscreen as he was driving in the South East.
  5. I wanted to move to the suburbs, and I spent a few years advertising in the classifieds of local newspapers, as well as HomeSwapper, Gumtree, and the local council offices. Eventually got a move, mostly because a family member works for a Housing Association. Searching for a precise match on a Mutual Exchange is like trying find your doppelganger - it can be almost impossible at times! My own situation was the fact that my parents passed away nearly 20 years ago, and so was left on my own in a two bedroom property - at least I wasn't told to get out when they passed on despite what the previous council had told my parents back in the early 1990s as to continuing to live in the house if anything happened to them. As I wanted to move from inner-city to suburb (I am a sensitive type), and also the Bedroom Tax looming, it allowed me to kill two birds with one stone with the move. Now I have made the move, I feel that I have stepped over a hurdle that I would have regarded as almost impossible five years ago.
  6. It will be my birthday on Wednesday (30th). I won't go into too many details, but I have never really had many friends in order to have birthday cards from - in some years, the postman doesn't even deliver to my address on my birthday. A couple of days ago, I wrote a tweet on Twitter to say that it is my birthday on the 30th. It would be nice if members could click on it and then click "Like" and "Retweet", just to see that people know and care. You don't need to do anything else such as comment. I would love it to get to at least double figures! I did the same thing last year, and only three people responded. If the late Winnie Blagden can get 16,000 birthday cards on her 100th birthday, then surely I can get at least 10 Likes and Retweets to a special tweet that I have written? My birthday tweet is at: https://twitter.com/George30August/status/901265794935533569 Many thanks!
  7. Very sad to hear the news - he will be missed. Just couldn't imagined it happening for some reason, but I knew it would eventually. Fond memories of 1980s Friday nights (i.e. no school tomorrow) watching Play Your Cards Right, and Brucie doing his opening gambits of his lower catchphrase list of "what a lovely audience - you're so much better than last week" and "you really have cheered me up", and "she's full of gin" etc. Watched a few PYCRs on YT as a tribute this evening. I only remember his 1990s Gen Game, but I enjoyed it - miles better than Jim Davidson. I think that Bob Monkhouse was better at hosting game shows, but Brucie had a good go of the genre a few times. RIP Brucie.
  8. I just cannot imagine David Cameron being a smoker. Come to think of it, how many former Prime Ministers since the War have smoked? Harold Wilson was Pipe Smoker of the Year in around 1976 (and also for that decade as well), and perhaps Callaghan enjoyed a good puff as well. I am certain that Churchill was a cigar man, etc.
  9. Two months down the line, and I have only just seen this. Yes, there is a lot of truth in the article. My late mother smoked so much throughout her life, and it claimed her life when she was in her mid 50s - (she gradually became very ill, went to the hospital, doctors diagnosed terminal lung cancer and a week later she was gone). I believe that my mother's smoking caused the fact that I was starved of oxygen at birth and I had a below average Apgar score - (according to my birth notes, my skin was closer to blue than pink at birth), it has made me have the problems that I have had in the years to come such as Asperger Syndrome and social anxiety. Back then of course, in 1978 when I was born, although there were already the dangers of smoking that Sir Richard Doll had 20 years previously, we were still a while away from the discoveries and finding dangers that mothers smoking causes to unborn babies. It's almost like a form of abuse in a way. It does harm babies before they are born, and I believe that even a mother who has given up smoking years previously, can also have babies affected as well.
  10. I remember when I was at school, (and we are going back 25 to 30 years here), holidays were permitted during term time but it needed the approval by the Headteacher or senior member if teaching staff for a special form to be filled in. I think I remember that being mentioned in the parent's handbook that the school gave out when I was in Year 7. Mind you, I suppose that the current rules prevent the envy and resentment of one pupil enjoying himself on the beach on the other side of the world while his peers have to attend normal lessons at school and so on. I am someone who has an August birthday, sand so therefore because of English term times, I never had to go to school on my birthday - in other words, I was able to do something special on that date without school getting in the way of it - I don't know how lucky I was to have my birthday at that time of year. I remember there was a school Referendum to change the school terms and to have the school work all the way through August, and obviously hardly anyone supported it - I bet that the amount of truancy that would have gone on in August would have caused a U-turn in those plans as a result. And, that would have frustrated families who wanted to take holidays at that time of year as well. As Eric's Brother has just said, there isn't and compulsion to send children to school, but school is the default legal way of a child being educated - unless plans are officially made, it would be regarded that as a child is absent from school, they are not being educated, and so the EWO would be brought in, visiting parents and so on. I hated school when I was a pupil, and I often wished that I was home educated, and that my parents were rich enough for me to spend two weeks on the other side of the world, forgetting the misery if being bullied and so on.
  11. This story reminds me of when I was around 13 years of age. I always enjoyed riding on the buses in my local area (still do in fact). We are going back 25 years or so here. At the start of Year 9 I had this bus pass and I remember going on a few buses after school before going home - getting some shopping after school and all that. My mother used to know that I liked doing this. Not sure how much stuff was in the bag, probably one or two exercise books and a calculator for Maths. One evening I arrived home after walking through the alleyway from the main road to the street I used to live on, and my mother asked me "where's your bag?" It then dawned on me that I no longer had it. The problem was that I had been on so many buses that I must have left it on one of them, but couldn't remember which one. It was fruitless contacting the transport company place as I couldn't remember where or when I lost my bag, and when my English teacher had telephoned my mother at home when he was concerned about some homework that wasn't been handed in, she told him about it. I doubt that Lost Property had it because of the "finders keepers" concept that local people in my area had when they had found something that belonged to someone else. Got a new bag soon after, and I think that I got the other things replaced for a relatively small amount of money, but it didn't happen again!
  12. It almost felt like a coin tossing situation - Corbyn v Brexit, but Brexit isn't Corbyn in this case. Better the devil you know.
  13. I get excited about elections and referendums just as much as an adult, as I got excited about Christmas and birthdays as a child. I have got my Poll Card blu-tacked on my living room noticeboard, until Thursday morning that is, and I shall hopefully be one of the first to vote at my local Polling Station (aka a church community centre place) when it opens on Thursday morning at 7.00 am, just after I get a daily paper from the local newsagent and posted a few letters in the postbox on route. Basically, I do not want Jeremy Corbyn to set foot into Downing Street; and I voted to Remain in last year's Referendum, but although Tim Farron looks alright, I feel that a Liberal Democrat vote will not be enough to keep Corbyn out. Tactical voting for this election is the answer as far as I am concerned. May in June methinks.
  14. There is a lot of truth in that report - I personally feel "left behind" in society myself due to Asperger Syndrome, dyspraxia, anxiety, depression and other things. I am talking about both now as an adult, and also 30 odd years ago when I was a child - 300 odd pages of medical notes were the proof of the pudding back then. The fact that I am now in my late 30s and I am celibate because of my condition - I have had no chance of getting anywhere near a proper relationship and getting married - something that nearly all adults take for granted. Shouting is just as bad as whispering when it comes to letting people know about one's problems. Frustration is not the word. I now live in a suburb with a better standard of community spirit than in my old area, but my problems just let me down when it comes to friendships. Yes, I am "left behind", and I feel that I am still trying to keep up with people who are less than half my own age. It is relevant as today's children with disabilities will become the adults of 20 or 30 years' time, and one has to look ahead to see the "big picture" of what someone like that will be like then.
  15. All this talk about obtaining medical records on this forum reminded me of obtaining my own a few years ago. Back in 2007 and 2008, I obtained some medical records of my own health under the Data Protection Act 1998. These consist of hospital records (such as a routine operation that I had back in 1988), GP records, child development records and so on. I also obtained my birth records (it tells me when I was born, when the delivery of placenta was, my Apgar score etc). This is the crux of the matter, and this is what I am asking - as they are pregnancy records, they are obviously regarded as being the mother's medical records, but I am arguing that if one happened to be the baby born as a result of the pregnancy, they should also be seen as one's own personal records under the Data Protection Act 1998. What do you think? I obtained them under the Access to Patient Records Act 1990 as my mother is now deceased and passed away before I obtained them, but my point is that a record of one's birth is just as much a Data Protection thing, so why did I need to access it as if it was just my late mother's records? Would I have been able to obtain them under Data Protection Act 1998 if she had still been alive at the time? I believe that birth records should automatically be seen under Data Protection Act 1998. Does anyone agree with this?
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