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The Glassman

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About The Glassman

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  1. Pig headed? Calm down. I'm reading the original post and giving my opinion on it. I think *it* has flaws.
  2. Caught out by the terms you agreed to when you 'entered' that scenario? Whether it had PP or not, the sign (which also states a tariff) will also give some indication on what would happen if a valid ticket is not displayed. OP claims to have bought a ticket; and another. Then says it(they) must have 'blown' from view when the door was shut. Who walks away without checking that the permit is on show (why buy one if you don't?)? OP is here now looking for a trump card on how to get the bad people off her back. I'm all for consumer rights and fighting against those bad people but let's accept responsibility for our own wrong doings.
  3. Really? I'm a consumer and I've had a go at private charge notices when they've tried it on. But this one seems to be a simple case of accepting that that you were caught out.
  4. Buy ticket; display where it's clear to see. Anyone conscious of their actions would look and check to see before walking away. Something amiss here IMHO.
  5. I agree about the unscrupulous business models of these organisations, but the OP knew what she was in for because she clearly states that she purchased a valid ticket (or two). The issue therefore became that it wasn't displayed. You can't then say 'it must have fallen from view in the wind' from the door closing (you would check before walking away). A ticket which must have blown away sounds more like the OP may not have had one to begin with.
  6. You purchased a ticket and displayed it, therefore you admit to accepting the terms. But it 'must have blown down' when you shut the door... surely you would have checked at the time? The spirit of accepting the terms is to display your ticket? When they contacted you to do what they said they would do if you didn't display a valid ticket, you ignored it? If you have both tickets, you have proof and it would be a simple case of showing and demonstrating that there has been a terrible mistake, surely?
  7. I found it after a Google search on a similar matter I'm helping someone with; seems pointless to start a new thread so given it was indexed via an internet search thought I'd update this one for relevancy.
  8. Insuring a car is easy. Getting the right* cover is the hardest part. * - right for you, in the sense that the proposer takes reasonable steps to make you aware of all the salient points of that cover so that you can make an informed decision before [policy] inception. This way you know exactly what will happen in the event of a claim scenario.
  9. No letter needed; simply point out that the damage is preexisting, and occurred before policy inception. Therefore, the onus is on them to act. If their decision is to dig their heels in, well, you know what to do at that point.
  10. When you hire a car, various insurances are on offer. You don't have to take them all, but what you are assuming is ownership/responsibility of the car for the hire period. If, during that time, the windscreen is damaged this is the hirer's responsibility. If there is insurance to indemnify that loss (to the hirer) it will be dealt with as such, but if not, the hirer must return the car in the same condition it was when it was handed over. You can't hand it back damaged and then negotiate the damage. It would have been better to have it repaired before handing over. NB: not all chips will meet the repair criteria of the car owners.
  11. This. All day long. And the car should have had a full inspection by BMW, all billable to either the insco (for telling you to use that windscreen co) or by the windscreen company because they SHOULD be owning the problem and not trying to wriggle out of it.
  12. Football, a fist, downward pressure when clipping the wipe cowl back in... there are many ways to crack a screen. A windscreen is a sandwich construction of two layers of glass with a Poly Vinyl Butyral interlayer. It's not as forgiving as say, a toughened window can be. For the sake of being objective, a customer drives away after having wipers fitted and returns later with a cracked windscreen claiming that it was the (wiper) fitter's doing. It's not something which can be proven. For example, dropping a spring loaded wiper arm onto the glass without the wiper blade on it will almost certainly create a starbreak; drop the arm with the blade on it and it may only be a short crack if it damages it at all (different results if there was already damage there too!). There may also have been a stonechip in the blacked-out part of the windscreen and it just happened to spread at that time; it's easy to point the finger at the last person to be near the damage because that's how most of us would think. If the store manager does 'pull a favour' I think that's all he can do; it's a goodwill thing and very much down to discretion (in my opinion).
  13. It's not an uncommon story, I'm afraid. The windscreen replacement industry is littered with similar stories some, much worse! Without any further delay, contact the fitting company and notify them of the problem. In my experience, it seems that you will need the windscreen removed, and refitted and there are obviously issue with how it was fitted in the first instance: 1. Whistling: could be gaps in the adhesive; insufficient application of adhesive; poor contact between the two surfaces; contaminated glass. 2. Leaking: if it is the top, this is usually down to where the adhesive is joined (as the fitter leans over to join from the starting point). The best way to apply adhesive for a bonded windscreen is ON the windscreen, ergo: one join (which will be a the bottom). There are two further articles on the subject: i) The Paradox of Windscreen Safety; ii) An Industry Contributing to its Own Demise. I've been involved in the windscreen replacement aftermarket for two decades, and have seen the decline; nothing surprises me but just when I think I've seen it all, something new pops up! Good luck in getting the problem sorted.
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