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Tony Dixon

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About Tony Dixon

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  1. Thanks HB, I tried but couldn't work out how. Thanks Again Tony
  2. Thanks All, Let me put something together and let me know what you think... Thanks Again Tony
  3. Sorry for that - I didn't mean to cause any offence - I was responding to Bazooka Boo and though I found the guard to be really unhelpful you're correct, name calling is wrong and doesn't add anything of value to the debate - I hope you can appreciate my frustration though...I buy tickets every day (I can prove that) and got caught out like this on one occasion which has brought about this nightmare scenario. Strictly speaking what I did was wrong and, as I can't prove I queued and actively sought out the guard/s without video evidence I guess it would boil down to his word against mine - in which case I'm stuffed.
  4. Thanks Old-CodJA, I would very seriously consider whether you might choose to seek an out of Court disposal in this case - how would I go about that? To complicate matters I am going out of the country on vacation for 2 weeks from this Sunday and will not have access to my mail. To your point: 'If it can be shown conclusively that you approached the guard, not that you simply got in at the door where he was standing, it may help your case, ...' How could I conclusively show that I sought out, found & approached the guard (without access to video evidence)? ----------- As for the second part '... but if that evidence also shows that when asked to alight and get a ticket you delayed and failed to do so, that would be counter-productive' In your letter (dated Wednesday 3rd July) you also assert that '...you were given the opportunity to leave the train before it departed and you decided not to'. I would refer to Mr Thompson's (the guard's) notes that state (in his own words): 'I advised him to leave the train, but the train doors started to close so he could not get off'. (he modified this in his later statement to say I 'hesitated for a short while, then the doors started to close and he did not get off'. However, I believe it is true to assert that his original notes were accurate and that video evidence from the train would prove this. Any further thoughts on these matters? Thanks Tony
  5. Thanks Bankfodder, Yes - I definitely mad a mistake - I WILL NEVER BOARD A TRAIN WITHOUT A VALID TICKET AGAIN - however, interestingly, on other occasions (maybe 2 that I can remember) when the queues have gotten out of hand someone with a high vis jacket instructed everyone to go through and buy a ticket on the train. The reason I asked for a 'bridge pass' on the fateful day was that on a previous occasion (again due to the irregular occurrance of very large queues and very slow machines) I had asked to women guarding the gate if I could board the train to buy a ticket and they refused - which meant I missed my train for work. ***Perhaps more interestingly, on another occasion (18th March 2013 - before I received the summons) I asked the guy guarding the gate if, because of the long queues, I could board the train and buy a ticket on there. He said yes - I boarded the train and bought a ticket as I planned to without any issue. I explained this and attached a copy of my ticket / proof of purchase with my reply to the original letter I received from SWT. So, on this occasion I also boarded a train with the intent to buy a ticket - should I be prosecuted for that too (even though the guard sold me a ticket? - don't worry it's a rhetorical question) - just shows the inconsistency.
  6. Thanks Bazza, Video evidence would prove I queued (showing intent to purchase), also the fact that I actively sought and found the guard by walking the length of the train (internally) also demonstrated that I intended to pay. not sure about point 2. Thanks Again Tony
  7. No - he refused to sell me a ticket - he wanted to report it (maybe these guys are on commission) - the train stops halfway to my destination so I left the train and bought one at the first opportunity... Yep, total jobsworth - people like that make me want to withdraw from the human race! I need to write a letter to disclose my defense - here is what I've written so far.... This is my response to your letter dated Wednesday 3rd July 2013. To paraphrase I have been accused of the following: '...did travel, or attempt to travel upon the railway without having previously paid the fare and with the intention to avoid payment thereof'. (quoted from the court summons) Below is my explanation of why I pleaded not guilty. My defence is based on the fact that I fully intended to purchase a ticket for the train - therefore I disagree with the assertion that I had an 'intention to avoid payment'. The evidence for this is in the fact that I queued up for a substantial amount of time for a ticket for my train but realised that, if I had waited to complete the transaction to buy a ticket, I would have missed the 8.00 train and would have been late for work. Video evidence from the main hall (I entered the station by the main entrance) will prove the fact that I queued up for a ticket for a considerable amount of time. Queuing up for a ticket for a considerable length of time is, I believe, not to my mind consistent with an intent to avoid payment. I believe that contrasting video footage of the queues in the main hall on Monday 4th Feb with queues on other random Mondays (i.e. if not carefully selected by SWT) would, I believe, prove this assertion. I'm sure that SWT could produce videos of queues of other Monday morning queues being similarly large but these would need to be selectively chosen and would therefore not be truly representative. My point being that it would have been at least very difficult to anticipate the scene in the main hall at Guildford station on that 4th February. Video evidence would also, I believe, show the time each individual transaction was taking longer than usual (usual meaning on average) at each of the machines - If memory serves me correctly these transactions were very slow on that day - over 2 minutes each? I am confident that video footage could prove this. It is true that I made a conscious decision to request and use a bridge pass - however, I did so with the intention to purchase a ticket on board the train. Mr [edit]'s incident notes (IC1 JB 470 - attached with your 3rd July letter) state (in his own words): ...'Just prior to departure when a person I now know as Anthony Dixon approached and asked to buy a ticket...' This is further evidence of my intent to purchase a ticket. Walking the length of a train to locate a guard and then to approach him to ask to buy a ticket is also, I believe, not consistent with an intent to avoid payment. The fact that I purchased a ticket (a photocopy of this ticket was attached to my letter of 08/04/2013 to Mrs [edit] (also attached to your letter dated Wednesday 3rd July 2013.) from Aldershot station immediately after speaking with Mr [edit] is also, I believe, not consistent with an intent to avoid payment. For the record I was travelling to my workplace in Frimley - the train stops in Aldershot and sits still for 15 minutes before leaving for Frimley. I took the first opportunity to purchase a ticket by leaving the train to purchase a ticket at the ticket office in Aldershot - I did not leave the station (as Mr [edit] asserts in his March 1st statement). In your letter (dated Wednesday 3rd July) you asked: '...why did you not purchase an advanced ticket given that you would be aware of the possible volume of passengers using the train service on a Monday Morning?' As noted above, I did not anticipate the size of the queues on Monday 4th being unusually large on Monday 4th February. I also did not purchase and advanced ticket because I was not aware that they were/ are available though I have since become aware as a guard offered to sell me one after checking my ticket on a recent train. Nonetheless, my defence is based on my intent to buy a ticket. In your letter (dated Wednesday 3rd July) you also assert that '...you were given the opportunity to leave the train before it departed and you decided not to'. I disagree with this assertion - as my [edit]'s notes (IC1 JB 470 - attached with your 3rd July letter) state (in his own words): 'I advised him to leave the train, but the train doors started to close so he could not get off'. I see that in his later notes (dated March 1st - almost one month after the incident) Mr [edit] asserts that I 'hesitated for a short while, then the doors started to close and he did not get off'. However, I believe it is true to assert that his original notes were accurate and that video evidence from the train would prove this. In summary, I boarded the train with the intent to buy a ticket. I actively sought out and a guard to buy a ticket and approached Mr [edit] and his colleagues to purchase a ticket. They had the equipment to issue me with a ticket but Mr [edit] ignored my request and started to explain how I needed to buy a ticket before boarding the train and asked me how I got into the station - at this point the doors closed before I could leave the train. In the circumstances I believe it is not fair or accurate to say that I decided not to leave the train. This makes up the bulk of my defence.
  8. Hi All, I have recieved a summons for the 20th August 2013 accused of... '..On Monday 4th February 2013 between Guildford and Aldershot stations did travel or attempt to travel, upon the railway without having previously paid the fare and with the intention to avoid the payment thereof: contrary to S.5 (3) (a) of the Regulation of Railways Act 1889 as amended by section 84 (2) of the Transport Act 1962 and section 18 of the British Railways Act 1977.' Here's the background: I arrived at the station and there were long queues for all of the ticket machines - I queued for 15-20 minutes (I believe - could have been less though) reached the machine but decided to make a run for it to catch my train (to arrive at work on time - I would have missed it otherwise). (There are cameras everywhere in the station so I guess there would be video evidence showing that I was queuing and intended to buy a ticket). I asked the man at the barriers for a 'bridge pass' so I could enter the station so I could catch the train and buy a ticket from the guard on board (I dishonestly entered the station but with the right intent (to buy a ticket on board) - a mistake I know - but I can hardly believe that it's come to this). On the bridge pass it says 'this is a permit to cross the bridge and must not be used for travel on any train - penalties applied may be: prosecution under the following legislation: s. 5 (3) (a)...' as above. I boarded the train and went through it to the back end where the guard usually is to buy a ticket - however, there were a group of 4 inspectors there - I asked them if I could buy a ticket... In his statement the guard who reported me said : 'Tony Dixon approached & asked to buy a ticket and I informed him that he must buy a ticket before you board the train and advised him to leave the train but the train doors started to close so he could not get off'. In his new statement he says I hesitated for a while before the doors closed but I don't think anyone (even Usain Bolt!) would have been fast enough to get through those doors. I explained what had happened - he seemed sympathetic and to accept that I fully intended to buy a ticket but he refused to sell me one and insisted on taking my details and reporting the matter. I gave the details, signed a statement saying the I 'absolutely intended to buy a ticket' and then bought a full return to cover my journey as I had intended to in the first place. I received a letter from SWT, responded to it and assumed they'd accepted my explanation - however... I recently received a summons with the charge above and responded to plead 'not guilty' - the case was then adjourned till 20th August. I decided to plead not guilty as it is fairly obvious (to me at least!) that the 'the intention to avoid the payment thereof' part of the accusation was/is false. So, have I done the right thing in pleading not guilty? Do you have any tips as to anything I need to do say before or when I'm in court?If you could give me any advice it will be much appreciated - I can't believe that this incident has gone this far - I'm losing sleep! I look forward to recieving your feedback and suggestions! Thanks in advance for any help. Tony
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