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Stigy

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Everything posted by Stigy

  1. Hi Surfwalkersteve, It's likely they will invite you in for a further interview to establish any other facts about your journey history. As it stands you just need to await their correspondence as has been advised already. I assume they have the ticket in their procession as evidence? I've skimmed through this thread but get the impression its a paper ticket rather than an oyster/smart card type? They will be able to find out which barriers the ticket has been through, as any ticket office can perform this check. Regarding the fine; If it goes to court, the maximum fine
  2. Not going to get in to a debate about privatisation, however, things are a lot better and SAFER, than they were in BR days I can assure you. @Nystagmite regarding your query, complaints can be made to the local station management, but probably more sensible, would be to report it to the train operator who manages the station, so GWR in this case. They should have an online process, or a paper form at the ticket office. Regarding these incidents, short of raising the platform, I don't see what can be done about it? All trains that serve Bristol Parkway have a G
  3. A recordable offence is one that is recorded on the Police National Computer (PNC). Those offences listed on DBS checks tend to be recordable offences, as the DBS generally use the PNC when checking an applicant's history. There have been occasions however whereby non-recordable convictions have shown up on DBS checks, presumably from court records? I would say that unless this is an offence of dishonesty, it's unlikely to be recordable, as most offences relating to travel are non-recordable.
  4. Buses aren’t my forte I’m afraid, however since it’s a Single Justice Procedure, it would suggest these regulations are on a par with Byelaws, and thus non-recordable. the Single Justice Procedure notice isn’t the offence, just to clarify. That’s what is used these days to prosecute more minor offences in order to bring a matter to court without having a prosecutor attend etc.
  5. You were of course quite within your rights to ask questions with regard to the member of staff’s authority over you etc, and all you legally have to supply is your name and address. It sounds as though he thought you were being difficult? This doesn’t help your case of course, but that’s how it sounded Reading your post. I suggest awaiting any correspondence from the train operator and go from there. You mentioned you were read your rights, or words to that effect? You were cautioned, but it sounds like you chose not to answer any questions. This is of course your right, but in r
  6. You really don’t get it, do you? I have offered you experience based advice, I just haven’t spoon fed you. If you want it in black and white, then yes, I have heard of people appealing and having their PFs withdrawn. How does that help you though? That’s a rhetorical questions. Telling you about the fact that should the matter go to court, it would be a criminal matter, as far as I’m concerned is more beneficial, as you indicated you’d fight it at court as long as it remained civil. regarding your attitude; You just come across as an entitled snowflake to be honest. I’v
  7. So you come here for advice, and expect people independent of the industry to help you? That’s not how it works. You should expect people to tell you the truth here and not simply tell you what you want to hear. All I’m guilty of here is actually trying to help you, in a realistic approach. If you’re blinkered by what your daughter has said, that’s your problem as far as I’m concerned. Rather than getting on your high horse, how about a “thanks for your help”? It’s common courtesy to acknowledge somebody when they’ve advised you, not just get on the back foot. It now be
  8. Handled differently in comparison to who? Which aspect of the staff member’s attitude reduced your daughter to tears? I’m not a revenue inspector but I deal with everyone consistently, whilst also applying an amount of discretion where required. Would your daughter have been dealt with in this way with me dealing with her? Maybe, but I wasn’t there so can’t say for sure (although I don’t issue PFs I report people for offences). The penalty amount I believe is the latter, £80 or £40 within 2-weeks these days.
  9. If your daughter appeals and loses (I say your daughter because it’s her responsibility as an adult), she will need to pay the amount due. If this remains unpaid, the notice will be cancelled and it will go to court. However this will be under the original Byelaw (18(2) more than likely) which is a strict liability matter, meaning there’s no real defence to it. This is a criminal matter so won’t be kept ‘civil’ as the PF was initially. I would be very careful how you broach this, as you weren’t there. You’re quick to criticise the staff member and to be honest all revenue staff by
  10. Hi, Bearing in mind the requirement to hold a ticket (or Oyster Card in your daughter’s case) hasn’t been met (technically), the Penalty Fare Notice was correctly issued. The whole ethos behind Byelaw 18 is that it sets the requirement to buy a ticket before travelling, and/or be able to produce a ticket on demand. The fact that one cannot produce a ticket may well be that they have lost said ticket, or it may be that they ‘lent it’ to a mate to use. I have a couple of questions here; 1. How old is your daughter? 2. In what way did the member of staff
  11. As has been said, the DoB alone won’t get you off this one. If you’re saying it wasn’t you, that’s another matter. But it was you, so you’d be lying. Appeal anyway if you believe you have been hard done by, or believe the notice shouldn’t have been issued, you have nothing to lose. Unfortunately though, you’ll likely not win an appeal purely based on a gesture of goodwill.
  12. Indeed. In this day and age too, it’s unlikely you’ll be required to even produce any documents to the police. We live in an electronic age, where all documents are readily available to the police before they even stop you from the like of the Motor Insurance Bureu and DVLA. Can’t remember the last time I had an insurance certificate....it’s on my ‘portal’ these days lol. In fact, the police will most likely not even ask for one at the roadside because they’re not worth the paper they’re printed on. Anyway, I digress. My Driving Licence is in my wallet....I just assumed that was th
  13. All of the above is of course good advice. I’d imagine the case will be closed pretty quickly if you follow all the steps provided. I would also consider providing them with your full description, because the RPI would have taken your impersonator’s description at the time, which may in itself close the case quite quickly depending on a) how thorough it was and/or b) how much you differ from the person who used your details physically.
  14. Hi, their investigation is in to your circumstances not your friend’s. Where it is possible the address would flag up if you’ve mentioned your friend, unless TfL have his card, there’s no real evidence to suggest any wrongdoing on anybody else’s part. This has obviously got to the stage whereby they’re considering a court summons, so I’m assuming you were thoroughly investigated and questioned under caution? The compensation here may be taken in to account on a day by day, journey by journey basis, assuming you were questioned on individual journeys. Otherw
  15. I'd usually urge anybody to appeal as they have nothing to lose (however I appreciate that ship has all but sailed now anyway). However, as Honeybee has said, the whole idea behind having to produce the ticket itself rather than the receipt, is that tickets are non-transferable, and anybody could have been using your ticket. That unfortunately means the Penalty Fare Notice was correctly issued. I'm not judge and jury, however In this situation too, I'm reluctant to urge you to appeal, because you just seemed to want to pull a fast one anyway, and to be fair, got off quite likely.
  16. You too, honeybee! and yes, love the new look site. Wasn’t sure if it was actually new or just that I’ve not been here for ages lol.
  17. Hi Dx, thanks...It's been a while. I'm back and ready to help where I can. can't believe it's been so long since I swung by! Anyway, I digress. Good to be back .
  18. Hi Greygoat, Just to chime in here, I personally think you're getting anxious about this too much. TfL could call you in for another interview if they believe there's more to this than meets the eye (if there's evidence to suggest this was an on-going series of offences for example, which couldn't immediately be ascertained under questioning). Cross this bridge if and when you come to it and don't give anything away in the meantime. Don't come across that you're trying to make excuses for your actions in any correspondence with TfL. You should apologise for
  19. You're welcome, by the way... Oh, and I've taken it upon myself to correct your post to reflect what actually happened...
  20. Thanks for taking the time to post this, DKL111. It's so nice when people do this, especially when we've only indirectly aided them!
  21. Xeito, This will gain more of a response if you start your own thread and structure it in paragraphs (it's very aggressive on the eye in its current state!). Mods, can this be made in to another thread in any way as this is initially a 4-year old topic?
  22. Hi didntdoit, Not a great deal to add here, just that being a Byelaw offence that's being charged, this suggests that they only have evidence for this rather than that of fare evasion (contrary to more serious legislation), therefore it unfortunately doesn't matter whether this was an honest mistake or not. I suspect the RPI's suspicion was that it was deliberate, that's why he reported you. However there's more than likely only evidence to prove the Byelaw offence which, as has been said, requires only proof that you didn't have a valid ticket etc. Which you didn't,
  23. Hi Shaun, Sorry for the late arrival...just got an SOS and here I am lol (work gets in the way sometimes!). The problem with Solicitors is that unless they specialise in railway matters, they often promise things they can't deliver. For example, some solicitors are under the impression that Railway matters are al civil ones, which is incorrect. The also don't often appreciate that a Railway Byelaw for ticketing is strict liability, meaning there's very little one can do you be found not guilty of such an offence (either you had a ticket, or you didn't...). From what I
  24. If they accepted the details you supplied, which it sounds like they did, I'd pay up and say no more. As long as you pay the notice, you'll hear nothing further (bearing in mind your details will more than likely be correctly logged on your Oyster record). You could also appeal, but to be fair I think quite frankly, you'd be cheeky to even consider doing so. If you were prosecuted, it would more than likely be under s5(3)a and c of the Regulation of Railways Act 1889 (intent to avoid payment and supplying an incorrect name/address) which per offence would average out
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