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mutzi

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About mutzi

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  1. This topic was closed on 09 March 2019. If you have a problem which is similar to the issues raised in this topic, then please start a new thread and you will get help and support there. If you would like to post up some information which is relevant to this particular topic then please flag the issue up to the site team and the thread will be reopened. - Consumer Action Group
  2. This topic was closed on 09 March 2019. If you have a problem which is similar to the issues raised in this topic, then please start a new thread and you will get help and support there. If you would like to post up some information which is relevant to this particular topic then please flag the issue up to the site team and the thread will be reopened. - Consumer Action Group
  3. This topic was closed on 08 March 2019. If you have a problem which is similar to the issues raised in this topic, then please start a new thread and you will get help and support there. If you would like to post up some information which is relevant to this particular topic then please flag the issue up to the site team and the thread will be reopened. - Consumer Action Group
  4. Can I ask if you had any luck with this? I just found out about this law after being charged £70 'admin' for references etc for a flat I've yet to move into. No fee, no tenancy, was their attitude when I queried it... so paid and then started looking into it some more. I have to wonder what it is the landlords are paying them for, seems like both sides are being charged for the same activity! I've drafted a letter (to send after I have moved in) with the aim of recovering this money and hopefully making them think twice about mucking me around with the return of the deposit when the time comes. Personally I'm mentioning the rent act first of all as the UTCCR, I think, is less clear cut here. You might want to include a reference to the housing act 1988, the rent act covers only protected tenancies, the housing act extends it to assured ones.
  5. You will owe for the last 2 years only, they also have to be reasonable in repayment arrangements. Look on the bright side you got 5 years free power
  6. Your post isn't 100% clear, what period does the £3600 relate to, the whole 7 years? Read the bottom 2 sections of this page: energywatch: Billing Basics Stay away from the keycard meter, they are more expensive to run. Don't pay extra for their mistakes.
  7. Unfortunately they can and will. All the banks tend to do this (that sounds familiar.) They will likely close her current account when she makes a claim, so they can't do it again at any rate. To be honest I would just tell them where to shove all of their accounts As for the notice period, this is set out in the banking code. The best I would imagine you would achieve by going down that route is simply a refund anyway.
  8. From personal experience energywatch seem to be quite efficient at dealing with these people, so you've done the best thing there. You could always try the press, local or otherwise, those responsible won't like it much. Depends on whether you're comfortable with any publicity over it.
  9. BBC NEWS | Programmes | Working Lunch | MBNA charges for being in credit ok...
  10. The problem, and the reason they get away with it, is lack of proof. There are a few threads around here where a bailiff has assaulted someone, usually trying to force their way in and when the police get involved they turn around and make out its them thats been assaulted by the debtor. He'll just deny saying any of it or with regards to listing your equipment that he didn't know it was required for your employment. It's your word against his. This however doesn't mean you can't lay it on thick with the council and try to get them to accept payment direct from you. All you can really do is demand they reduce the charges to the correct level. Obviously this IS something you can prove they've done wrong so they should back down pretty quick. It's just a pity so many people never even know they're being overcharged.
  11. Write (don't phone) and ask them to provide a breakdown of their charges. Work out from this page what you should have been charged: National Debtline England & Wales | Debt Advice | Factsheet 02 Bailiffs And Council Tax From the same page, they cannot take "such tools, books, vehicles and other items of equipment as are necessary for use personally in employment, business or vocation"; Good luck
  12. The 6 years limit refers to the date of the original default, any further payment or acknowledgement by the debtor in writing, whichever is the most recent. So if she hasn't paid anything and hasn't sent any acknowledgement in 6 years she's fine. The fact that they sent something last year (when it was probably already over 6 years anyway) is irrelevant. The letter mentioned above (http://www.consumeractiongroup.co.uk/forum/debt-bailiffs-advice/20758-creditors-dcas-letter-templates.html#post162366) should get rid of them.
  13. Referal fees sound like... penalty charges. Claim them back
  14. Sorry to hear they are still chasing you maggie. Remember how many deadlines they have said they will take you to court after, in your very first post in this thread you supposedly had until the end of September. It's just intimidation. And a couple of additional points you could throw in when complaining. Studio have charged you for PPI without any sort of agreement. Wescot have sent you a letter stating they are no longer dealing with the account and then continued on anyway. The ICO should be able to get wescot to provide you with the infomation requested. Neither the OFT or FSA will take up individual complaints, if laws have been broken they will act for consumers as a whole. Trading standards I think are still your best bet for ridding yourself of wescot.
  15. Yes, unfortunately, overdrafts are 'repayable on demand' and the OFT guidelines (http://www.consumeractiongroup.co.uk/forum/debt-bailiffs-advice/55579-oft-guidelines-debt-collection.html) are designed to cover accounts after default so they don't have to accept payments over time yet. Why they won't though is beyond me, a debt collection agency will take a cut of the original debt from abbey for their 'services' so from a business point of view they stand to lose out. I'm guessing whoever you spoke to just isn't capable or willing to accomodate you. Your obviously want to avoid a default notice so you could try writing to them (don't phone again) and offer a repayments as you can afford. If this fails perhaps you can arrange an replacement overdraft with your new bank to cover it, a bit like a balance transfer on a credit card. You'd be best to try this sooner rather than later as getting sufficient credit after a default has been registered will be considerably more difficult. Be wary of abbey adding charges to the current balance now that they've removed the overdraft, if you act quickly enough it may save you having to go through the process of reclaiming them again. Good luck
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